Church Community – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 21:17:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Community – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 Archdiocesan Conference Focuses on Building an Inclusive and Accessible Church for People with Disabilities https://kcacm.org/archdiocesan-conference-focuses-on-building-an-inclusive-and-accessible-church-for-people-with-disabilities/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 20:51:25 +0000 https://kcacm.org/archdiocesan-conference-focuses-on-building-an-inclusive-and-accessible-church-for-people-with-disabilities/ Clergy, Catholic school leaders, catechists, teachers and lay ministers gathered at Sacred Heart Major Seminary for a day of reflection and education during the “All Are Welcome” conference on Friday, August 5, which focused on building an inclusive community for people with disabilities. (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic) The “All Are Welcome” conference challenges ward […]]]>

Clergy, Catholic school leaders, catechists, teachers and lay ministers gathered at Sacred Heart Major Seminary for a day of reflection and education during the “All Are Welcome” conference on Friday, August 5, which focused on building an inclusive community for people with disabilities. (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic)

The “All Are Welcome” conference challenges ward leaders to pay attention to the needs of underserved families, ask “How can I help? »

DETROIT – The ministries of the Archdiocese of Detroit attended the All Are Welcome conference on August 5, which focused on creating an inclusive community for people with disabilities.

Clergy, Catholic school officials, catechists, teachers and lay ministers gathered at Sacred Heart Major Seminary for a day of reflection and education with a keynote presentation by Sr. M. Johanna Paruch, FSGM, Ph.D., professor of theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville. The free conference was sponsored by Ascension Southeast Michigan Community Health and the Archdiocese of Detroit.

If the participants took away only one thing from the conference, Sr. Paruch said she hoped it would be that “everyone’s attitude should be that of Christ,” she said.

“It feeds everything. Our attitude should be that of Christ, who became flesh for us,” said Sr. Paruch, who is also a consultant to the Committee on Evangelism and Catechesis of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. “We must remember that Christ emptied himself and took on the form of a dying man on the cross for us. When Jesus was on the cross, he was also totally disabled. So he always becomes who we are.

Conference participants listen to Sr. Paruch's opening address.  The conference also included breakout sessions, a mass and lunch.  (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic)

Conference participants listen to Sr. Paruch’s opening address. The conference also included breakout sessions, a mass and lunch. (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic)

Sr. Paruch used anecdotes from her own life to illustrate inclusivity, beginning with her childhood and family, talking with colleagues and students, and sharing stories of saints with disabilities.

Sr. Paruch shared her devotion to Saint Margaret Castello, known as “little Margaret”. Born in 1297, Margaret had an extraordinarily deep curvature in her spine, which made walking difficult. Margaret was born blind and most modern scholars believe she also suffered from dwarfism, Sr Paruch explained. Margaret’s parents tried to heal her and locked her in a room next to the church and slipped food for her. Margaret eventually escaped and joined the Third Order Dominicans.

“She had tremendous faith in God, and she could have been totally dejected” because of her experience, Sr Paruch said. “She came out to evangelize, and in those days people were probably running in another direction when they saw her coming. A lot of people would think Margaret was a witch or that God punished her…all those stupid reasons they had and still have for people with disabilities. She said she wondered why people took pity on her; was it not a privilege to suffer with Christ? Suffering, for her, was the way to paradise.

Understanding this Catholic perspective on suffering is extremely important, Sr. Paruch said, but when talking with people with disabilities or their parents, “redemptive suffering” is not the first thing to talk about. Instead, approach the conversation with love and a listening ear, she said.

Sr. M. Johanna Paruch, FSGM, Ph.D., professor of theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, was the keynote speaker for the conference.  (Courtesy of Franciscan University of Steubenville)

Sr. M. Johanna Paruch, FSGM, Ph.D., professor of theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, was the keynote speaker for the conference. (Courtesy of Franciscan University of Steubenville)

Children's books and toys promoting inclusiveness for people with disabilities are featured at the August 5 conference.  (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic)

Children’s books and toys promoting inclusiveness for people with disabilities are featured at the August 5 conference. (Valaurian Waller | Detroit Catholic)

Often, says Sister Paruch, people say there are no people with disabilities in their parish, but this can often be because the church is simply not accessible.

“When people say, ‘We don’t have disabled people in our churches,’ that’s impossible,” Sr Paruch said. “We have to get rid of this idea because what is probably happening is that the parish is not accessible. I’m not just talking about wheelchair ramps and accessible bathrooms or interpreters or braille or whatever. If people don’t welcome our brothers and sisters with disabilities, then it’s not accessible.

Sometimes parents who enroll their children in religious training courses or religious events do not mention their child’s disability or request accommodation for fear that the church will not let their children attend, Sr. Paruch.

“Because of the gospel, we cannot do this. When you consider working with people with disabilities, there is the medical and therapeutic side, but that is not our job; our work is pastoral and catechetical,” she said. “So that’s what we’re trying to do, and to be pastoral we have to be welcoming. We need to be welcoming enough that parents want to tell us.

Nicole Joyce, associate family ministry director for the Archdiocese of Detroit, said many parishes and schools in the archdiocese offer programs such as adaptive catechesis for sacrament preparation and work to make buildings accessible.

In June, Joyce formed a group of lay ministers to deliver adaptive programs in hopes they can become mentors to others who want to do more to make their parishes inclusive.

“I think we could definitely do a better job as a people as a whole of being more inclusive just in how we interact with people when they come through our doors, making sure we’re friendly and hospitable and asking “Is there anything I can do for you? “Said Joyce. “’What do you expect of me to have a better experience at Mass?’ or ‘What do your children need from us to better live the sacraments and participate in the life of the church?’

“I think it’s really important that we as a church are constantly aware that anyone who walks through our doors might experience something that we can’t see or understand and how important it is for us to be there, to welcome them and to be accommodating and inclusive.

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Comedian Jo Koy talks about the role of the church in his life and his new film “Easter Sunday” https://kcacm.org/comedian-jo-koy-talks-about-the-role-of-the-church-in-his-life-and-his-new-film-easter-sunday/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/comedian-jo-koy-talks-about-the-role-of-the-church-in-his-life-and-his-new-film-easter-sunday/ “Easter Sunday” has a PG-13 rating, released on August 5. Joe Valencia’s mother and aunt fight, but the drama reaches a new level when the two women show up to church wearing the same long brown dress – and at Easter, to top it all off. Comedian Jo Koy’s directorial debut “Easter Sunday” follows Joe […]]]>

“Easter Sunday” has a PG-13 rating, released on August 5.

Joe Valencia’s mother and aunt fight, but the drama reaches a new level when the two women show up to church wearing the same long brown dress – and at Easter, to top it all off.

Comedian Jo Koy’s directorial debut “Easter Sunday” follows Joe (Koy), who returns home for Easter to his loving, but somewhat erratic family. Over the course of the film, they bicker, eat, drink, laugh, and unravel the drama of the house.

The film takes viewers through the Filipino experience. Expect to salivate watching family dinner scenes with sumptuous spreads. Meanwhile, the church and family homes, which serve as the film’s backdrop, encompass a sense of community. Since the film is loosely based on Koy’s life, his family and Easter became an important part of the storyline.

Why Easter?

“It was the biggest holiday we all shared as a family. It was bigger than Christmas, it was bigger than Thanksgiving,” Koy told Deseret News in an interview.

All the parents came, and there was church, food, entertainment, fights and everything else, Koy said.

“There was no obligation to buy presents for everyone. It’s just Easter, you just bring a jar of food,” he joked. “‘Oh, by the way, let’s go to church because they got free donuts today. There are other Filipinos who will be there too. So let’s go see them.’

“That was the whole point of starting ‘Easter Sunday’. It’s the best way to talk about family and culture. ‘identify,’” Koy added.

The church means a lot to Jo Koy’s family

But that’s not the only reason this story is important to the comedian. Her mother, an immigrant woman in America, struggled to find a sense of belonging.

This search was much more difficult at that time, when there was neither Facebook nor Instagram. Her mother had to go out and find her people. She went to church every Sunday and eventually started approaching people who looked like her, hoping they were also Filipino.

Church gave Koy’s mother “a chance for my mother to be seen,” he said. “When you go to church, no matter your ethnicity, we all believe in Jesus. So today, we all get along.

Church attendance provided many get-togethers and potlucks, where Koy was able to meet other Filipinos and make friends. This is the role faith played in his family and community.

Jo Koy hopes you identify with ‘Easter Sunday’

After talking about his stage culture for so long in his stand-up comedy routines, Koy is happy to finally see the story come to life on the big screen.

“Instead of always having the same response to my routine, which is ‘Oh, that’s too specific. Not everyone will understand,’ he said, ‘to now be able to broadcast and show the world that you will get it and feel good about it.

He hopes viewers will see their own family in the film’s characters, “opening the door to a lot more other ethnicities that aren’t really being heard.”

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Cove Church Offers Support to Ukrainian Refugees | Herald of Copperas Cove https://kcacm.org/cove-church-offers-support-to-ukrainian-refugees-herald-of-copperas-cove/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/cove-church-offers-support-to-ukrainian-refugees-herald-of-copperas-cove/ Following the war between Russia and Ukraine, some Ukrainians sought refuge in the United States, including at Copperas Cove. “If our church was supporting a family in need, there might be more individuals or groups nearby who could do the same,” church member Desirae Clark said Sunday during a worship service. at the Cove Church […]]]>

Following the war between Russia and Ukraine, some Ukrainians sought refuge in the United States, including at Copperas Cove.

“If our church was supporting a family in need, there might be more individuals or groups nearby who could do the same,” church member Desirae Clark said Sunday during a worship service. at the Cove Church of the Nazarene. “Ukrainians live in family groups in their home country and many stay because not all of their family members are able to find the resources to move.”

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Montenegro government faces no-confidence vote on church deal https://kcacm.org/montenegro-government-faces-no-confidence-vote-on-church-deal/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:22:58 +0000 https://kcacm.org/montenegro-government-faces-no-confidence-vote-on-church-deal/ The signing of the Basic Agreement between the Government of Montenegro and the Serbian Orthodox Church. Photo: Government of Montenegro A number of government coalition parties on Wednesday announced a no-confidence motion in Prime Minister Dritan Abazovic’s government after signing a ‘fundamental agreement’ with the Serbian Orthodox Church, SPC, the largest religious community in the […]]]>
The signing of the Basic Agreement between the Government of Montenegro and the Serbian Orthodox Church. Photo: Government of Montenegro

A number of government coalition parties on Wednesday announced a no-confidence motion in Prime Minister Dritan Abazovic’s government after signing a ‘fundamental agreement’ with the Serbian Orthodox Church, SPC, the largest religious community in the country.

Abazovic signed the agreement with the Patriarch of the Porfirije Church on Wednesday in Podgorica, stressing that all religious communities should have equal rights.

“The process of negotiating a fundamental agreement has taken too long, but now this issue is finally settled in a civilized manner. The government is doing everything with the desire to build a society of justice and equality,” Abazovic said in a press release.

“In this way, we send a message of peace and tolerance and the country should turn a new page,” he added.

Montenegro has signed similar “fundamental agreements” with smaller religious communities: with the Catholic Church in 2011, and with the Islamic and Jewish communities in 2012. But no agreement has been reached with the Serbian Orthodox Church.

Patriarch Porfirije said both Montenegro and the CPS need the agreement, stressing that it is in line with the Montenegrin constitution.

“The Church wanted nothing more than any citizen of Montenegro related to the subject of religion, nor did we have the ambition to achieve more than any other religious community. I believe that all citizens are happy because of this agreement,” Patriarch Porfirije told the media.

According to the agreement, the Serbian Church does not need permission from the government to move the cultural heritage belonging to it, but must obey the law on the protection of cultural heritage.

The government is obliged to register all Orthodox churches and monasteries as belonging to the CPS and also to begin the process of restitution of Church property nationalized or confiscated by the Communist authorities after the Second World War.

According to the agreement, the state cannot authorize the construction of Orthodox churches without the approval of the CPS, while Orthodox religious education can be regulated in public schools.

While pro-Serb parties hailed the signing of the agreement, the ruling Democratic Party of Socialists, DPS and Social Democratic Party called for snap elections, saying the document was signed without broad consensus .

“We will launch a motion of no confidence in parliament and call for early elections. This agreement is against the constitution of Montenegro and will be suspended immediately after the election of a new government,” the DPS said.

The signing of the agreement was also criticized by some NGOs, who accused the government of failing to engage in dialogue during the preparation of the agreement.

“The government started with non-transparency and went on to feign dialogue and ignore different opinions. [It was] the grand finale of the clericalization of Montenegro,” the Center for Democratic Transition, CDT, an NGO, said in a press release.

On July 21, the government formed a six-member team of experts to analyze the draft basic agreement, but some members of the civic sector resigned, because they opposed one of the members proposed by the government. On August 1, the government announced that it would sign the agreement without any changes.

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New Vienna Community Church hosts Dusty Barrett, from Greenfield, in concert on August 7 https://kcacm.org/new-vienna-community-church-hosts-dusty-barrett-from-greenfield-in-concert-on-august-7/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 19:57:19 +0000 https://kcacm.org/new-vienna-community-church-hosts-dusty-barrett-from-greenfield-in-concert-on-august-7/ The New Vienna Community Church will host a concert featuring Dusty Barrett on Sunday, August 7 at 10:30 a.m. as part of its “Bring a Friend Sunday” program. Barrett grew up and lives in Greenfield. He sang in Christian bands for many years. It was in 2017 that Barrett began to feel the call of […]]]>
The New Vienna Community Church will host a concert featuring Dusty Barrett on Sunday, August 7 at 10:30 a.m. as part of its “Bring a Friend Sunday” program.

Barrett grew up and lives in Greenfield. He sang in Christian bands for many years. It was in 2017 that Barrett began to feel the call of a new season in her life. Through much prayer and guidance, he made the decision to exercise faith and begin a solo ministry.

He is thrilled to be able to share his heart and testimony with people across the country. He feels God has prepared him for this season of ministry and is excited to share a wide variety of music.

You’ll enjoy new and old songs you know, as well as original music. Barrett hopes to provide Christian entertainment that appeals to all ages while sharing the gospel with the lost and encouraging the Christian to keep the faith.

Barrett lives in Greenfield with his wife, Alisa, and three children, Stacey, Kate and Camden.

“We are thrilled to present Dusty Barrett in concert at our church,” said Pastor Dan Mayo. “We have known and experienced his music ministry for years, and my wife, Bev, and Dusty love to talk about their shared alma mater, McClain High School. Dusty has a real heart for serving Christ and lifting him up through his music. We are pleased to offer this concert in person or at the venues listed below. If you cannot join us on Sunday morning, please feel free to tune in online at your convenience.

The church is located at 412 West Street in New Vienna. The services will be streamed live on the New Vienna Community Church’s You Tube site. Just go to YouTube and type in New Vienna Community Church or join us on Facebook on our “NVCC” Facebook page.

For more information, call Pastor Mayo at (937) 725-0445.

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Flooded Kentucky wearies after another natural disaster https://kcacm.org/flooded-kentucky-wearies-after-another-natural-disaster/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 05:10:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/flooded-kentucky-wearies-after-another-natural-disaster/ HAZARD, Ky. — National Guard firefighters and crews swarmed eastern Kentucky after days of deadly flooding, rescuing hundreds of people who became trapped in the dangerous waters. Also preparing to send a delegation: the small community of Bremen, Ky., nearly 300 miles away. When Bremen was torn apart last year by one of the worst […]]]>

HAZARD, Ky. — National Guard firefighters and crews swarmed eastern Kentucky after days of deadly flooding, rescuing hundreds of people who became trapped in the dangerous waters.

Also preparing to send a delegation: the small community of Bremen, Ky., nearly 300 miles away. When Bremen was torn apart last year by one of the worst tornadoes in state history, the mayor of a small town in the east of the state came to help with the cleanup. This town, Hindman, was among the hardest hit by flooding this week. The mayor of Bremen therefore immediately began planning trips across the state with trucks full of supplies – even as his own community continued to rebuild.

“I said, ‘You were here in December and helped us,'” Mayor Allen Miller of Bremen told the mayor of Hindman in a phone call. “‘Now it’s time for me to return the favor.'”

Officials have backed efforts like these as a testament to a kind of generosity embedded in Kentucky culture, a spirit forged over generations of hardship in which communities have had to rely on each other for support. get out.

But this round of support is also a stark reminder of the turmoil caused by the natural disaster that has gripped the state in recent months and will make recovery from the latest calamity all the more difficult. Officials said Saturday that at least 25 people had been killed in the floods, but it could take weeks for the scale of the human toll and physical devastation to become clear.

“I wish I could tell you why we continue to be affected here in Kentucky,” Gov. Andy Beshear said during a briefing during which he updated residents on the rising death toll and posted a feeling of anguish and exhaustion that many in the state felt. after recurring disasters, including a powerful ice storm last year that knocked out power to 150,000 people in eastern Kentucky, a flash flood last July that left many people stranded in their homes, and the few December tornadoes that carved a nearly 200-mile path of destruction and killed 80 people.

“I wish I could tell you why areas where people may not have much continue to be affected and lose everything,” the governor continued. “I can’t tell you why, but I know what we are doing in response. And the answer is all we can.

These disasters – especially floods and tornadoes – would be mind-boggling setbacks for any community. But here they have been particularly calamitous, hitting rural areas already deeply vulnerable after decades of decline.

“These places weren’t thriving before,” said Jason Bailey, executive director of the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, a nonpartisan think tank, noting the erosion of the coal industry and the loss of manufacturing jobs. . “To even get back to where they were is a long road.”

For communities inundated by the powerful floods, this road has only just begun.

The worst of the devastation was concentrated in about half a dozen counties in the eastern Appalachian region of the state. At least 14 people, including four children, have died in Knott County, officials said. More than 1,400 people have been rescued by boat and helicopter, and thousands remain without power.

Houses were torn from their foundations. Bridges were washed away, leaving some remote communities inaccessible. “I’ve seen ditches forming where there were none from rushing water,” Harlan County Executive Judge Dan Mosley said.

His community has seen only minor flooding, he said, so for the past few days he has accompanied county transportation department workers with dump trucks equipped with snow plows to clear roads. blocked by mud and debris in nearby communities. The worst destruction he saw was at Knott and Letcher Counti

“Sheer catastrophic loss is hard to put into words,” he said. “I’ve never seen anything like it in my career or even in my life.”

In Breathitt County, at least four deaths had been confirmed, around a dozen people were missing and much of the county remained under water. Many homes in the sparsely populated county were still inaccessible. The community was already struggling to find its place after the last flood.

“We had another flood, a record flood, not 12 months ago, and many families had just started to get their lives back on track,” said Hargis Epperson, the county coroner. “Now it’s happened again, worse this time. Everyone has lost everything, twice.

In Hazard, a town of just over 5,200 in Perry County, 24 adults, five children and four dogs had taken refuge at the First Presbyterian Church – a number that was almost certain to climb in the coming days . Their homes had been flooded or destroyed by a mudslide.

Some of them arrived soaked and covered in mud, said Tracy Counts, a Red Cross worker at the church. All she had to offer them were baby wipes; there was no running water.

“It makes the puzzle harder to solve, but we adapt and realize that,” Ms Counts said. “It’s just hard to ask for help when we’re all in this together.”

Melissa Hensley Powell, 48, was brought to the church after being rescued from her home in Hardshell, an unincorporated area in Breathitt County. She and her boyfriend had pulled her brother, who is paralyzed, out of their house and then brought out a mattress for him to lie on. They kept him dry by holding garbage bags and umbrellas above him.

Two days after her rescue, while having lunch with Little Caesars pizza and bottled water, she said the severity of what she had endured was sinking in. “It’s starting to happen,” she said. “We’re still in that adrenaline rush.”

At the church, a worshiper rented a portable toilet. People dropped off water, blankets and dog food, with donated items filling some of the benches.

“I know people have this image of eastern Kentucky,” Ms. Counts said, acknowledging the painful perception of outsiders in the area as poor and backward. “But we are the first to intervene. We are the first to ask: ‘How can we help?’ »

But now an onslaught of disasters was testing that supportive spirit in profound ways.

It’s hard to tie a single weather event to climate change, but flooding and tornadoes have highlighted the vulnerabilities Kentucky faces. For some, it has also underscored preparedness failures, as experts warn of heavier rainfall, shorter but increasingly powerful flash floods and more erratic weather patterns overall.

“Let us be aware that this is a new normal of incredibly catastrophic events, which will hit our most vulnerable communities.,said Alex Gibson, executive director of Appalshop, the arts and education center in Whitesburg, Ky., comparing the litany of flooding in eastern Kentucky to the devastation suffered by impoverished island nations in the world in the era of climate change.

In vast swaths of the state struggling with the aftermath of flooding and tornadoes, Bailey said, infrastructure was already inadequate and communities had become impoverished. “We have people living on the edge,” he said.

“A lot of the wealth has been extracted,” he said. “In a topography that has been literally stripped of trees and mountainsides, flooding in particular is becoming more likely, more risky, more dangerous – that’s what we’re seeing.”

And as much as communities want to rely on each other to recover from the devastation, it would be difficult to raise the necessary resources on their own.

“The pressure has been immense,” Judge Mosley, who is also an officer with the Kentucky Association of Counties, said of the widespread aftermath of major disasters.

Without outside support, “it would be insurmountable”, he said. “Federal government resources and our faith in God are the only things that will get us through this. »

Shawn Huber contributed report.

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Reverend Dunn Appointed Priest in Charge of Redlands Episcopal Church | Community https://kcacm.org/reverend-dunn-appointed-priest-in-charge-of-redlands-episcopal-church-community/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 20:19:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/reverend-dunn-appointed-priest-in-charge-of-redlands-episcopal-church-community/ Responding to a higher call, the Reverend Bill Dunn of Beaumont has been appointed priest in charge of Trinity Episcopal Church in Redlands. He will continue to serve as curate at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Beaumont. While at Trinity, Dunn is tasked with putting together a team to search for a permanent rector. In […]]]>

Responding to a higher call, the Reverend Bill Dunn of Beaumont has been appointed priest in charge of Trinity Episcopal Church in Redlands.

He will continue to serve as curate at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Beaumont.

While at Trinity, Dunn is tasked with putting together a team to search for a permanent rector.

In a social media post last weekend, he hoarsely thanked his followers for their prayers as he overcame a temporary loss of voice, and explained that various members of his diocese were called upon to serve at other locations, including his call to Redlands.

“We have people who are going to be all over this part of the diocese leading worship, sharing our gifts – and we think that’s so symbolic of the spirit that we all have right now as clergy. This is an extraordinary time in the church.

Whether congregants are gathered in Redlands, Yucaipa or Beaumont, Dunn assured congregants that “even though I will not be with you in all those places in person, I will surely be there with you in prayer and in spirit.”

In response to social media posts, he acknowledged that he would help “help Trinity find a good rector”, although “the job is not finished at St. Stephen’s either” and that “St. Stephen’s has come a long way, and my work there continues.

Additionally, he noted, “Trinity desperately needs time to do good research. Welcome prayers!

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Valley Vineyard Church looking for school supplies for the 11th annual competition | Positively Chippewa Valley https://kcacm.org/valley-vineyard-church-looking-for-school-supplies-for-the-11th-annual-competition-positively-chippewa-valley/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 02:55:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/valley-vineyard-church-looking-for-school-supplies-for-the-11th-annual-competition-positively-chippewa-valley/ CHIPPEWA FALLS (WQOW) – A local school supply giveaway is less than three weeks away, but he needs your help gathering more supplies for the kids. The Valley Vineyard Church in Chippewa Falls will organize its 11th backpack and school supplies next month. Officials have already started collecting donations of pencils, pens, notebooks, folders, glue […]]]>

CHIPPEWA FALLS (WQOW) – A local school supply giveaway is less than three weeks away, but he needs your help gathering more supplies for the kids.

The Valley Vineyard Church in Chippewa Falls will organize its 11th backpack and school supplies next month.

Officials have already started collecting donations of pencils, pens, notebooks, folders, glue sticks and erasers, but they could still use more, as well as calculators, pencils and backpacks.

Pastor Michael Houle said when they first started doing this more than a decade ago, they handed out supplies in 150 Walmart plastic bags. And in recent years, they distribute up to 900 to 1,000 backpacks full of school items.

“We start from scratch every year with this, so it’s amazing how much our community has blessed us every year to make this happen, but we’re just grateful to be here,” Houle said. “Several years ago our building burned down and we rebuilt, and just being able to do that and bless our community is so honoring to us.”

House says this is truly a community effort and places like 4:30 AM Coffee House, Markquart Motors, WWIB radio station and 12 churches have donated over the past few years.

Backpack and school supplies are held Sunday, August 14 from 1-3 p.m. at the Valley Vineyard Church at 910 Bridgewater Ave. at Chippewa Falls.

If you would like to donate online, go to cfvalleyvineyard.org/donate. You can also drop off supplies at the church. The church encourages monetary donations more because they can get the supplies in bulk. If you have any questions, call 715-861-3523 or email info@cfvalleyvineyard.org.

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DC Catholics mourn loss of Latin Mass after executive order bans practice https://kcacm.org/dc-catholics-mourn-loss-of-latin-mass-after-executive-order-bans-practice/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 20:33:18 +0000 https://kcacm.org/dc-catholics-mourn-loss-of-latin-mass-after-executive-order-bans-practice/ Standing in front of his parishioners, holding in his hands the holy bread of Communion, the parish priest Vincent De Rosa solemnly intoned in Latin “Ecce Agnus Dei”. The English translation of these words: Behold the Lamb of God. Those who knelt in the church responded with their own ancient words, “Domine, non sum dignus”. […]]]>

Standing in front of his parishioners, holding in his hands the holy bread of Communion, the parish priest Vincent De Rosa solemnly intoned in Latin “Ecce Agnus Dei”.

The English translation of these words: Behold the Lamb of God.

Those who knelt in the church responded with their own ancient words, “Domine, non sum dignus”. Lord, I’m not worthy.

An air of serious contemplation hovered over Sunday mass at Sainte-Marie-Mère-de-Dieu parish, tinged with sadness.

It would be one of the last weeks parishioners of the church could celebrate using a traditional Latin form that dates back more than a millennium.

Last year, driven by ideological wars between conservative and liberal wings, Pope Francis said he wanted to limit the use of the old Latin form of the Mass.

This week, the consequences of this papal letter – published on the other side of the world – landed here in Washington with heavy consequences for this small parish in the city’s Chinatown.

On September 21, the parish was told, they were to stop using the Latin rituals that had been part of St. Mary’s history almost since its founding in 1845.

Friday’s local edict, written by Cardinal Wilton Gregory, who oversees the Archdiocese of Washington, allows only three non-parochial churches in the area to practice the Latin Rite. This means that hundreds of Catholics who attend this type of Mass in about six DC-area parishes — including Holy Mary Mother of God — will be forced to revise their ritual or abandon their spiritual homes to attend all three locations. of the region authorized to perform this.

“It’s been devastating to be honest,” said Erin Menke, 42, whose family has been attending Saint Mary for nearly two decades. Three sons had served as altar servers in the parish. To help the parish priest, they painstakingly learned the intricacies of the Latin Mass, which incorporates traditional elements like incense, Gregorian chant, and elaborate gestures and words often absent from the modern form of the Mass.

“There’s a sacred reverence that’s just beautiful,” Menke said. “These words that are spoken and have been spoken for centuries in the church, they often feel like the closest thing to heaven we have. To realize that we are going to lose this, we are in shock.

In his ruling last year, Pope Francis explained that he believed the Latin Mass had become a wedge, deepening divisions. Those in favor of the Latin Mass, he said, had exploited the rite as a means of “strengthening differences and encouraging disagreements that harm the Church.”

Most Catholic churches now give modern Mass in the language most easily understood by local parishioners, a practice spurred by the reforms of the 1960s. For this reason, the decree will not affect the majority of Catholics in the area of Washington.

St. Mary Mother of God, however, was among the most vocal churches pressuring the Cardinal to allow them to keep the Latin Mass in their services. They wrote letters, spoke in synodal listening sessions with leaders of the archdiocese, and begged the cardinal to visit their church to see for himself the importance of the Latin Mass for their community.

Besides the language difference, in the Latin Mass the priest faces away from the congregation and instead faces the tabernacle at the front of the church where the Eucharist is kept. Many who attend Mass in Latin say they appreciate the opportunity to meditate and contemplate during the long periods when the priest speaks softly in Latin.

“You feel a connection with all the Catholics who came before you and celebrated using those same words,” Matthew Balan said as he sat on the wooden pews. He comes from a family of Catholics for generations in the Philippines. Balan met his wife at Sainte Marie while attending Latin Mass, and they were also married there. But now he doesn’t know whether they and their two young boys will stay at the parish or move to one of the other venues still offering Latin Mass. “It’s a confusing time for many of us.”

In a heartfelt sermon on Sunday, De Rosa acknowledged the pain, anxiety and confusion many felt. And he told his flock that he shared those sentiments.

“It tugs at the strings of my heart,” he said. “There is something that seems mean in this whole story. … But my goal is to show you that your father here and other fathers in this diocese feel your pain.

De Rosa urged this flock to hold on to truth, unity and their faith throughout the seismic changes coming to their parish.

About 60% of the church’s collection money comes from parishioners who attend its 9 a.m. Latin Mass on Sundays, said Sylvester Giustino, who sits on the parish’s finance board.

“I’m worried about our parish and what’s happening in September,” he said. “I intend to stay. Saint Mary’s has become a home for me. But for the others who leave, I can understand that too. We are not only losing the Latin Mass. We are going to lose many families and people who have been part of this community for years.

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FCPS: Important update on the addition of a Justice High School https://kcacm.org/fcps-important-update-on-the-addition-of-a-justice-high-school/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 20:56:42 +0000 https://kcacm.org/fcps-important-update-on-the-addition-of-a-justice-high-school/ Dear Justice High School community, FCPS worked closely with the community and county to address capacity issues at Justice High School. We are pleased to be able to provide a significant update on our building expansion efforts to find a solution to relieve overcrowding and provide a worthy learning and working environment for our staff […]]]>

Dear Justice High School community,

FCPS worked closely with the community and county to address capacity issues at Justice High School.

We are pleased to be able to provide a significant update on our building expansion efforts to find a solution to relieve overcrowding and provide a worthy learning and working environment for our staff and students. We would like to thank the community and our stakeholders for their feedback. This has been invaluable as we work to finalize plans for this important addition to school facilities. FCPS staff shared plans at various stages of the process with the school, community, PTSA, Mason District Land Use Committee (October 27, 2020; April 26, 2022; and June 28, 2022) and the Fairfax County Planning Commission on July 13, 2022.

During the process that resulted in the proposed plan:

  • The design team considered additional parking options, including limiting the existing car park with a corner car park, but this resulted in fewer parking spaces than the original plan.
  • New design features have been added to include proposed additional parking near the school’s main entrance and gymnasium, which changes the current setup and operations during student drop-off and pick-up times. The new designated parking lot near the school entrance will replace the current bus stop and buses will remain in the driveway.
  • A new kiss & ride location has been identified at the back of the site near the new addition. The design team will investigate the possibility of queuing vehicles for the kiss & ride at the back of the school.
  • A new sidewalk and striped parking spaces along the school side of Peace Valley Lane opposite Justice Park have been added.
  • The possibility of reserved parking on Peace Valley Lane opposite the residential area for school use during school hours was explored.
  • Stormwater upgrades through the installation of three stormwater units that will improve existing systems are included.
  • Solar initiatives, including an installation of solar panels for some domestic hot water units in the new addition, have been included.
  • The project was originally funded for construction during the 2019 School Bond Referendum and was expected to be completed in the fall of 2022. Construction is now expected to begin in the spring/summer of 2023 and be completed in the summer of 2025.

    The final plans for the Justice HS addition will be on the agenda of the Fairfax County Planning Commission on July 20, 2022, which can be viewed online(link is external). The plans will also be on the agenda for the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors public hearing on August 2, 2022.

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