Church Community – KCACM http://www.kcacm.org/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 17:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Community – KCACM http://www.kcacm.org/ 32 32 Kawaiaha’o Church begins to digitize its archives http://www.kcacm.org/kawaiahao-church-begins-to-digitize-its-archives/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 16:49:00 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/kawaiahao-church-begins-to-digitize-its-archives/ September 26 – When Kahu Kenneth Makuakane discovered documents in the state archives detailing his great-grandparents’ journey to immigrate to Hawaii from China many years ago, he said finding that connection helped to bring them back to life. Now, he hopes that a new project to digitize all of the hundreds of thousands of Kawaiaha’o […]]]>

September 26 – When Kahu Kenneth Makuakane discovered documents in the state archives detailing his great-grandparents’ journey to immigrate to Hawaii from China many years ago, he said finding that connection helped to bring them back to life.

Now, he hopes that a new project to digitize all of the hundreds of thousands of Kawaiaha’o Church archived documents will help others find similar connections in their family histories.

“It’s like a chicken skin moment,” said Makuakane, the church’s senior pastor. “Bringing things to life that I have only heard about gives me a sense of belonging and being.”

Makuakane said digitizing and cataloging all church records, including audio tapes, music and photographs, as well as baptism, marriage, death and funeral records, is a huge undertaking. and has been a long time coming. But thanks to a grant of $ 98,288 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, two staff members were hired to oversee the project, as well as two part-time workers to digitize the documents.

Many of the church’s paper documents, he said, are old and compromised, so it’s important to preserve and restore them. The goal is to upload all documents to a public database on the church’s website, as well as better organization and storage of the physical records.

Many members of the community have asked to see certain documents, Makuakane said, and it has been difficult to find the documents, some of which are so old and fragile that church officials do not want to risk damaging them further.

There is no deadline for uploading documents yet, in part because additional funding is needed to complete the digitization process. Officials hope to work with more volunteers to help digitize the documents so the process can move faster.

Founded in 1820, Kawaiaha’o Church was the first Christian church built in Oahu and served as a community gathering place. Many Hawaiian alii worshiped in Kawaiaha ‘o, located at the corner of King and Punchbowl streets, and were also baptized, married and buried there.

A phrase in a speech given on the steps of the church by King Kamehameha III in 1843 later became the state motto, “Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka ‘Aina I Ka Pono”, commonly translated as “La life of the earth is perpetuated in righteousness. “

In conjunction with the Constitutional Convention of 1864, important political meetings and constitutional oaths of many of Hawaii’s leaders were held at Kawaiaha ‘o Church. In 1962, the church and neighboring Hawaiian mission houses were designated a National Historic Landmark.

Because of these centuries of history, Makuakane said it is more important than ever to preserve and perpetuate its stories and more.

“This church exemplifies more than what people realize,” he said. “We don’t just view (archives) as things, but we view them as people’s lives. That’s what makes it so spectacular.” —— Jayna Omaye covers ethnic and cultural affairs and is a member of the body of Report for America, a national service organization that places journalists in local newsrooms to cover undercover issues and communities.


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As Shiloh Temple celebrates 90 years in Minneapolis, congregation looks to the future http://www.kcacm.org/as-shiloh-temple-celebrates-90-years-in-minneapolis-congregation-looks-to-the-future/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 00:55:28 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/as-shiloh-temple-celebrates-90-years-in-minneapolis-congregation-looks-to-the-future/ Pickens walked through the gates of Shiloh Temple over two decades ago. “I just saw people evolve and become better,” he said. Pickens said joining the church shaped her life, inspiring her to give back. “Bishop Hall has become a father figure to me. I served here in the church and all the things that […]]]>

Pickens walked through the gates of Shiloh Temple over two decades ago.

“I just saw people evolve and become better,” he said.

Pickens said joining the church shaped her life, inspiring her to give back.

“Bishop Hall has become a father figure to me. I served here in the church and all the things that I do now in the community are due to the work that I have done here in the church, ”said Pickens.

“We don’t have all the answers, but we certainly have a presence to make a difference in lives,” said Bishop Richard Howell.

Howell has been the pastor of international ministries at the Shiloh Temple since 1980. His grandparents founded the church in Minneapolis.

“It’s exhilarating, mixed emotions. I think of the church when it started in the 1930s, ”he said.

Fast forward to 2021, Howell said the church has evolved and planted new seeds in the community.

Most recently, I took on a new assignment to reduce violence in North Minneapolis.

“It is going to take time. It is one of the most difficult problems we have had to face,” he said.

The 21 Days of Peace initiative started in May. It is an effort created by religious leaders to take guns off the streets and make neighborhoods safer.

Howell said having a presence in the community lays a foundation for change.

“Reach out to those who are disadvantaged, reach out to the excluded and marginalized. I don’t care who they are. We need to have a deeper compassion for them, ”Howell said.

In order to keep up with the times, he explained that churches need to find new ways to engage with the community.

He says the Shiloh Temple will keep the momentum going and work towards a better future.

“These 90 years are wonderful, but what good is it if we fail in 91? It was good in the past, but we are not talking about the past now, ”he said. “We need to move forward and continue to be as dynamic and effective as we have been for the past 90 years.”


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Ground Zero: one month later | New http://www.kcacm.org/ground-zero-one-month-later-new/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 10:15:00 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/ground-zero-one-month-later-new/ It has been a month since the flooding changed life in Haywood County in many ways. In the aftermath of Tropical Storm Fred, there are the 114 families whose homes were completely destroyed, as well as 598 families whose homes were damaged or affected. The scope of the disaster went much further, however. Commercial and […]]]>

It has been a month since the flooding changed life in Haywood County in many ways.

In the aftermath of Tropical Storm Fred, there are the 114 families whose homes were completely destroyed, as well as 598 families whose homes were damaged or affected.

The scope of the disaster went much further, however. Commercial and government structures, commercial stocks and crops at various stages of the harvest were all affected by Tropical Storm Fred when it vengeanly struck Haywood on August 17.

But fierce as it is, the storm unleashed an even greater surge of community love.

It is this response that has kept people moving forward in the slow process of rebuilding their lives, said Ann Crawford, president of the Cruso Community Center and Friendship Center.

Although destruction from the storm was widespread, all six of the storm-related deaths occurred in Cruso, as did the most severe damage. The Cruso Community Center was the hub of the initial response.

Crawford becomes emotional and tearful as she describes the generosity she has witnessed since the disaster.

“Our sister community centers have been amazing, as have all of Haywood County and beyond,” Crawford said. “Everyone jumped in and helped. Haywood Electric has been amazing and the crews in the yellow shirts. They were a godsend. We cannot thank people enough.

The Cruso Community Center, a building that once served as a public school building for grades 1 to 12, was located on higher ground and therefore experienced no flooding, Crawford said. Electricity and water have never been cut off, there is a kitchen / cafeteria where meals can be served and a large parking lot where some of the displaced families originally slept in their vehicles.

At first there was no parking space in the normally sleeping community, where traffic was light and crowds were generally limited to events at the community center, services at the East Fork Baptist Church of the across the road, or calls to the nearby Cruso Fire and Rescue Service.

But within days of the flooding, as many as 200 search and rescue officers from across the state combed the community, helping people to get to safety, and later, looking for those who were. are still missing. Prepared meals were brought to the community center for those who no longer had a home or were in the community to help with the flood response.

Volunteers followed closely, helping families clean houses, remove debris and scavenge what they could. Then came state and federal inspectors who quantified the damage in the area and construction crews working to restore bridges and roads.

The Baptists on the mission, dressed in their bright yellow shirts, began to work as quickly as possible to make the homes structurally sound and secure before the onset of winter.

“We’ve seen this community come together in ways we never could have imagined,” Crawford said.

About 300 families lived across the river and had no way out after the main bridge could not be used. Once again, volunteers have flocked to the resuce.

“I didn’t know there were so many SUVs in the community,” Crawford said of the lifeline created by supplies being rushed to those stranded after a temporary walkway was built.

There was also a lot of carpooling, she says. Families whose vehicles were fine but couldn’t get out were told to simply use vehicles that their friends would park at the community center when they needed supplies in town, Crawford said.

Throughout the ordeal, Crawford faced his own personal loss. Her husband’s family owned the Laurel Bank Campground, which was devastated by the flooding and where four campers did not survive the flooding.

A new step

A month later, Crawford said the community had moved from emergency mode to the next phase – a phase where those whose lives were turned upside down by a sudden disaster came out of shock and are now in phase. acceptance.

“It’s a process,” she says. “The immediate needs are dwindling. The displaced people live somewhere. People are back to work. We are all in shock and in the grieving process. We got out of emergency mode, and it was bound to happen. “

The community center is almost back to its pre-disaster state. The library is open again and the supplies that once filled the cafeteria and auditorium are dwindling. The center always opens a few days a week when cleaning supplies can be picked up.

Some items are donated to other places where there is a need, such as Broyhill Children’s Home, or are taken to Cruso United Methodist Church, where the meal operation has been transferred. The community center has no heating, Crawford said, and typically closes in October when the building is wintered.

“This was set up as an emergency, but you’re not in an emergency forever,” Crawford said.

The need for basic products such as food, supplies and clothing disappeared and was replaced by a greater demand for building materials such as lumber, insulation and Placoplâtre. Yet, there is no place yet to store these types of materials, even if they have been donated.

There is one last gathering that Crawford is hoping to have, and it’s a Halloween party for the kids.

“Our kids have had such a crappy year,” she said. “It was really difficult. We really hope to have our traditional Halloween festival.

Progress is slow

It has long been said that the process of recovering from a flood will be a marathon, not a sprint. A drive through the community of Cruso a month after the floods confirms this statement.

Areas of US 276 South to Blue Ridge Parkway are still single lane, but instead of just one traffic light and flagman a month ago, there are now two traffic lights which are programmed to prevent vehicles from colliding.

There are still mounds of flood debris along the roadsides, clods of roots, tree branches and debris in streams and homes in various stages of cleaning up.

Just past the Cruso Fire Department is a large mobile home that was crushed against trees by raging water on August 17. On September 18, she was still there.


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News from the Stephenville community at a glance http://www.kcacm.org/news-from-the-stephenville-community-at-a-glance-2/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 20:52:52 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/news-from-the-stephenville-community-at-a-glance-2/ Adopt and Buy to Benefit the Humane Society Join the Erath County Humane Society for a grand opening of adoption and shopping at Little Treasures from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Little Treasures is located at 412 E. South Loop. ECHS will bring in adoptable residents and have a $ 10 microchip. All animals […]]]>

Adopt and Buy to Benefit the Humane Society

Join the Erath County Humane Society for a grand opening of adoption and shopping at Little Treasures from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Little Treasures is located at 412 E. South Loop.

ECHS will bring in adoptable residents and have a $ 10 microchip. All animals are welcome to come on a leash. Make a donation to ECHS for a 10% discount on a purchase.

Door prizes and vendors will be available.

For more information, call Little Treasures at (254) 595-1844 or ECHS at (254) 965-3247.

Creation of a medical expense fund for a resident of Stephenville

A go-fund-me page has been opened for Theresa Hobbs, 26, a resident of Stephenville, who was recently diagnosed with stage 4 glioblastoma, often considered the deadliest of cancers.

Her doctors said she was suffering from a very aggressive stage 4 brain tumor and that the funds would help cover her medical bills as she did not have insurance.

Theresa and her husband, Jake Hobbs, have been together since 2009 and have lived in Stephenville most of their lives.

To contribute, go to https://gofund.me/e7077678

CTFAC Welcomes Western Art Artist from Texas

The Cross Timber Fine Arts Council welcomes works by local Texan artist Jo Ann Schulze to its River North Gallery, 204 River N. Blvd., Stephenville. The exhibition runs until September 28.


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Journey Church opens new building to the community http://www.kcacm.org/journey-church-opens-new-building-to-the-community/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 06:41:47 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/journey-church-opens-new-building-to-the-community/ After several years of work and preparation, Journey Church opened the new building on September 26. They did most of the work themselves and the building contains several custom-made rooms. Scott Roberson | Daily newspaper Well, it was a home of their own. Since the Journey Church was formed in 2008 in Franklin, it has […]]]>
After several years of work and preparation, Journey Church opened the new building on September 26. They did most of the work themselves and the building contains several custom-made rooms. Scott Roberson | Daily newspaper

Well, it was a home of their own.

Since the Journey Church was formed in 2008 in Franklin, it has always met in any available space. They worshiped together in homes, rented space in a movie theater, and arranged to meet at Franklin Schools on Sundays.

All these spaces allowed them to practice their faith together and to form a community in Christ. But a place for them has always been in their plans.

“I say all the time, it’s just a building. It is a tool. It is something that we can use to help people find and follow Christ. But the people are the church, ”said Jim Clayton, pastor at Journey Church. “Now we can use it to help other people.”

What started as a vision 13 years ago has finally become a reality. Journey Church, a Franklin-based congregation, moved into its own building of worship in the spring, after years of hand renovating what was once a medical equipment manufacturing company.

Led by a dedicated team of volunteers, they installed rugs and flooring, hooked up televisions, added lighting and created a scene from scratch. The process was arduous, but well worth it, Clayton said.

“When we came here and talked about buying this, I could see what it would become in my mind. So I kept telling people, ‘I know you can’t see it yet, but I do. can. It’s gonna be awesome. ‘ It’s great to see it finally come to fruition, ”he said.

Pastor Jim Clayton poses in the sanctuary of the New Franklin Home at Journey Church Wednesday.  Scott Roberson |  Daily newspaper
Pastor Jim Clayton poses in the sanctuary of the New Franklin House at Journey Church Wednesday. Scott Roberson | Daily newspaper

Journey Church began as a Bible study in the home of Clayton and his wife, Jodi. After about a year, they started the church, meeting for the first time in September 2008 at Northwood Elementary School in Franklin. The church grew and eventually found larger spaces to meet at: Franklin Community Middle School, then Canary Creek Cinema.

“We were happy there, but we kept our eyes peeled in case something opened up,” Clayton said.

Their vigilance was rewarded when the building at 3062 Hudson Street on the north side of Franklin became available. Church leaders visited the space and were excited about the potential.

After long discussions, they decided to buy it in 2016.

“We have decided to go ahead and see what happens,” Clayton said.

Once the building was secured, Journey Church set to work. A fundraising campaign raised funds for the necessary renovations. To save money, they offered to do much of the work themselves. Clayton recruited volunteers to help with different aspects of building the church.

Although the medical equipment manufacturing company that previously occupied the space has disappeared, the vestiges of years of industrial work have remained. Dust from countless hours of grinding metal coated walls and floors, sometimes combining with moisture to create a brown slime. The machines had been abandoned and had to be eliminated. Electric cords hung from the ceiling.

As the volunteers cleaned and worked, they often found needles – one of the items made at the site.

“There was so much left. We scrapped as much as we could and the rest we just had to throw away, ”Clayton said.

Church members installed a new ceiling, painted the entire space, added carpeting, and built the stage and lighting. They tore off much of the existing structure and built new walls.

The only aspects of the project that church members did not take charge of were the plumbing, heating and cooling systems, and electrical systems, Clayton said.

He credits one particular volunteer, Steve Trego, who was constantly available for work. Often it was just the two of them to devote time to weekday evenings and Saturdays.

The week before Easter, church leaders learned that the building had passed all inspections. They could hold their first service in the new church during the holiest of Christian celebrations.

“It was four days before Easter that we got our occupation, so we were trying to get everyone in here. But it was exciting, ”Clayton said.

Hall of Journey Church in Franklin.  After several years of work and preparation, Journey Church opened the new building on September 26.  They did most of the work themselves and the building contains several custom-made rooms.  Scott Roberson |  Daily newspaper
Hall of Journey Church in Franklin. After several years of work and preparation, Journey Church opened the new building on September 26. They did most of the work themselves and the building contains several custom-made rooms. Scott Roberson | Daily newspaper

Passing through the entrance doors of the church, visitors are immediately greeted in an airy and spacious hall. A coffee maker and snacks allow people to grab something to eat and drink after the service, while tables in the lobby provide a place to chat with fellow worshipers.

Televisions broadcast the service in case parents need to take their kids out for some reason. A custom hardwood reception designed for a one-of-a-kind centerpiece from the moment you walk in.

“For our people, this is something they can be proud of. They own it because everyone gave to make it happen. A lot of people are putting work into it, ”Clayton said. “People are delighted to be able to come to us. “

At one end of the hall is the entrance to the worship space. The high-ceiling auditorium features a massive stage and a booth in the back allows church officials to control sound, lighting, and other aspects of the service.

Returning to the lobby, people enter the Kidz Zone. In a series of three designated halls, different age groups have a place of worship with their peers.

Each room has a different theme, like explorers, sailors, and scouts. Handmade decorations give each space a unique feel. For example, in the Navigators’ Room – for children in grades one to five – Jeep ornaments on the walls and bright lights create a lively space to relax.

“We want the kids to have a good time because if they don’t want to come back their parents won’t want to come back,” Clayton said.

Parents who bring their children there receive a visual reminder of how fast children are growing. Transparent cans filled with marbles are located on a shelf. Each cartridge represents a year in a child’s life, and the marbles represent the number of weeks remaining until the child’s 18th birthday.

“When your child is born, you have about 936 weeks until he is 18,” Clayton said. “It shows how time flies. Each week, when they drop off their children, they will remember that time is running out. “

Although they have been meeting at the church since April, small projects such as creating spaces for youth worship continued throughout the spring and summer.

Now it’s basically all over, Clayton said.

To celebrate the opening of the new building, Journey Church is holding a community open house at 10 a.m. on Sunday. After worship, visitors can tour the church and enjoy food trucks, inflatables, and other activities.

“We are delighted to invite the community to come and see what we have been doing,” said Clayton.

If you are going to

Inauguration of the Journey Church

What: A celebration hosted by the Franklin-based church to recognize its new space for worship. After worship, organize food trucks and inflatables for the kids, as well as other fun activities.

When: 10 a.m. on Sunday

Where: 3062, rue Hudson, Franklin

No cost

Information: Journeychurch.net


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Edina Morningside Community Church completes new garden | To free http://www.kcacm.org/edina-morningside-community-church-completes-new-garden-to-free/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:46:00 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/edina-morningside-community-church-completes-new-garden-to-free/ The Edina Morningside Community Church recently installed a new Peace Garden. The new public garden, located in the courtyard on the east side of the church, includes new seating areas, a patio, stone walkways, native plantings and green terraces, according to a press release. A peace pole will also be installed on the site next […]]]>

The Edina Morningside Community Church recently installed a new Peace Garden.

The new public garden, located in the courtyard on the east side of the church, includes new seating areas, a patio, stone walkways, native plantings and green terraces, according to a press release. A peace pole will also be installed on the site next month.

The courtyard on the east side of the church, located at the corner of Morningside Road and Grimes Avenue, has taken a beating in recent years. It was the site of a dumpster two different summers while construction and renovation projects were carried out, according to a press release from the church. With the dumpsters gone, church members reflected on what should be next for that area. Besides improving its appearance, they realized that they wanted the yard to show “good management of the land”, with things like native plantations, they wanted a place to grow vegetables for the VEAP, the radius. food from the area and they wanted a community gathering place.

To implement their ideas, church members hired a friend and neighbor Scott Herbst, of Watercolor Design, to develop a plan to transform the garden. Last fall, volunteers cleared old bushes and old plants, dug a rain garden and started planting the new plants.

Work continued this spring and summer, with more planting and the creation of a driveway and patio. The main aspect of the garden was completed last week.

A blessing and an official “opening” of the garden are scheduled for Sunday, October 10 at 11:30 am for all who wish to attend.


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Church Events 9-23-21 | Local religion http://www.kcacm.org/church-events-9-23-21-local-religion/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/church-events-9-23-21-local-religion/ To liberate oneself – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main Street, Cecil, welcomes a new group Breaking Free Wednesday at 7 pm. This is a group meeting open every Wednesday from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. -564-8383. Courses offered – St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 715 Jefferson Ave., Defiance will offer classes for Catholics who want […]]]>

To liberate oneself – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main Street, Cecil, welcomes a new group Breaking Free Wednesday at 7 pm. This is a group meeting open every Wednesday from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. -564-8383.

Courses offered – St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 715 Jefferson Ave., Defiance will offer classes for Catholics who want to update themselves on church teaching, those who want to learn more about the church, and those who wish to join the church. For more information, call 419-782-2776 and ask for Deacon George Newton.

Manhattan Beef Dinner – Union Chapel Church of God, 17983 County Road A, Bryan, will be hosting a Beef Manhattan Drive-Thru Dinner on Saturday from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm The menu includes: Beef Manhattan with mashed potatoes, green beans, salad and dessert. Advance ordering is available at 3 p.m. A voluntary donation will be accepted, with a suggested donation of $ 7 per meal. For more information or to order in advance, call 419-636-8141.

Community worship service – The Continental Fall Fest community worship service will meet in the meeting tent on Sunday at 10 a.m. Matt Edding will be the guest speaker, with everyone welcome for praise and worship. Parking will be available on the south side of the tracks.

Autumn Renaissance – Auglaize Chapel Church of God, 22652 County Road 60, Oakwood, will host fall revival services Sunday through Wednesday with guest speaker Dr. Bill Jones. The event will take place Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. with the event from Monday to Wednesday at 7 p.m. Jones served The Church of God in Michigan for over 18 years as a State Pastor. He has also served as senior pastor of Sears Church of God and Mio Church of God. In both churches he was instrumental in leading congregations in their numerical and spiritual growth. He now serves the church as a general minister. For more information, call 419-594-2441.

Concert – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main Street, will host a Christian concert featuring the Bluegrass Praise Band Sunday at 6 pm. For more information, text 419-564-8383.

Blessing of our pets – McClure United Methodist Church, 430 S. East St., invites animal lovers to bring their animals to church grounds for a celebration of blessing our pets, October 3 at 2:30 p.m. said Pastor Chuck Case, “Blessing our pets is a brief and meaningful way for us to show our love and concern for creation, and especially the animals with whom we share our lives. “My children have asked occasionally if they could bring our dog to church. For this event, participants can bring their dogs, cats, birds or hamsters. The event will include a song and a prayer of blessing for each pet. Pet owners are requested to bring their pets on a leash, in cages or in cages. For more information, call 419-748-8505.

(NOTICE TO CHURCHES: Any events that require admission, food or material fees may be included in the above list for $ 15 per week. To reserve a paid seat, contact CN Advertising at 419-784-5441, ext. 300726, or email: nhale@crescent-news.com Free events or those with a voluntary offering will be posted free of charge. To add an event to the church list, call 419 -784-5441, ext. 300737, or email: tmcdonough@crescent-news.com. Deadline for free and paid events is Tuesday at noon.)


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Teacher. Wijlens: Church learns to listen to survivors of abuse http://www.kcacm.org/teacher-wijlens-church-learns-to-listen-to-survivors-of-abuse/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 14:50:36 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/teacher-wijlens-church-learns-to-listen-to-survivors-of-abuse/ As a safeguarding conference concludes in the Polish capital of Warsaw, Professor Myriam Wijlens expresses hope that the Church will learn to listen to survivors of clerical sexual abuse, but says the next step is to do justice. By Devin Watkins The Warsaw conference concluded its work on Wednesday, with Church leaders from Central and […]]]>

As a safeguarding conference concludes in the Polish capital of Warsaw, Professor Myriam Wijlens expresses hope that the Church will learn to listen to survivors of clerical sexual abuse, but says the next step is to do justice.

By Devin Watkins

The Warsaw conference concluded its work on Wednesday, with Church leaders from Central and Eastern Europe returning to their dioceses to continue their efforts to end sexual abuse by members of the clergy.

Placed under the theme “Our common mission to safeguard the children of God”, the conference was organized by the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors (PCPM).

PCPM member Professor Myriam Wijlens spoke to Johana Bronkova of Vatican News about how the Church is making progress in the fight against the scourge of sexual abuse.

Listening and justice

The Netherlands-born theologian, who teaches canon law at the University of Erfurt in Germany, said the Warsaw conference showed that “the Church has learned to listen and is increasingly learning to listen better. “.

Prof Wijlens said bishops and the wider church community are increasingly realizing that survivors of clerical sexual abuse must be heard.

“The next step, however,” she added, “will be to administer justice.”

Best training required

The administration of justice, said Prof Wijlens, is a challenge, as it requires specific training on the part of canonical lawyers and those who investigate cases of abuse.

“You have to learn to put the data and the evidence together, and ask the right questions. We are not trained to do this, ”she noted, asserting that neither she, as a canonist, nor priests and laity have received proper training to assist in the administration of the Church. justice.

Professor Wijlens also spoke about what she perceives as a fear among bishops to expose clear consequences for offenders, which has consequences since sexual abuse is above all a “breach of trust”.

“If the bishops do not rise up and ensure that justice is done, the community as such cannot trust the judgment of the bishop, which affects the whole community. “

Double edged sword

Prof Wijlens said she had been involved in prosecuting abuse cases since 1987, saying her experience had shown her that the Church was “on track” on the issue.

She now lives in what was once East Germany and admitted that she had to learn very quickly how things worked when the area was under Communist rule.

“There would have been the risk of false allegations [of sexual misconduct], which would have put the priest in question, ”she declared. “But it was also possible that if the priests engaged in [sexual abuse] they would have been taken by the Stasi (East German secret police) – institutions that existed in Eastern Europe – and were then forced to cooperate with them. So, in a way, there was a double system.

At the same time, Professor Wijlens warned, Church leaders should not fall into the opposite trap and simply dismiss the claims as false. “It requires a very careful analysis of what is being put forward,” she added. “It’s a painful process.

Listen to the full interview

Confidence-building process

Asked about her reflections on the challenges the Church faces in relation to clergy sexual abuse, Prof. Wijlens mentioned both the particular difficulties of rebuilding trust in Central and Eastern Europe and the universal aspect of clergy. review of Church procedures for abuse cases.

“The bishops have a very complicated role: they have to examine the allegations and inform people about them,” she said, adding that transparency is important for the religious community.

At a more general level, the Church faces the task of revising canonical standards for cases of sexual abuse, while balancing confidentiality and transparency.

“The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors has this on its agenda, is very aware of it, and will hopefully deal with this issue in the months to come,” concluded Professor Wijlens. “At the same time, revising laws and procedures is a long and complicated process, so we are taking action there, but that does not mean that we will get results in a short period of time. “


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News from the Stephenville community at a glance http://www.kcacm.org/news-from-the-stephenville-community-at-a-glance/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 21:24:29 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/news-from-the-stephenville-community-at-a-glance/ Rodeo Kickoff Dance scheduled for Thursday Join the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council for a fun evening of music and dance as they celebrate Rodeo Heritage Week with a rodeo launch dance featuring traditional country music and Western swing artist, Jody Nix. The free concert is scheduled for Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Birdsong […]]]>

Rodeo Kickoff Dance scheduled for Thursday

Join the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council for a fun evening of music and dance as they celebrate Rodeo Heritage Week with a rodeo launch dance featuring traditional country music and Western swing artist, Jody Nix.

The free concert is scheduled for Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Birdsong Amphitheater in Stephenville City Park, 378 W. Long St.

For more information, contact the CTFAC at (254) 965-6190.

Adopt and Buy to Benefit the Humane Society

Join the Erath County Humane Society for a grand opening of adoption and shopping at Little Treasures from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Little Treasures is located at 412 E. South Loop.

ECHS will bring in adoptable residents and have a $ 10 microchip. All animals are welcome to come on a leash. Make a donation to ECHS for a 10% discount on a purchase.

Door prizes and vendors will be available.

For more information, call Little Treasures at (254) 595-1844 or ECHS at (254) 965-3247.


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The church closes, changes ownership http://www.kcacm.org/the-church-closes-changes-ownership/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 08:19:55 +0000 http://www.kcacm.org/the-church-closes-changes-ownership/ A property in Finley Street Church has changed ownership. The Jacksonville Community Christian Church, located at 405 Finley Street, decided to close and a small church took over the property. Jacksonville Bible Church took possession of the property in early August. The Jacksonville Bible Church began in November 2019 and the church was meeting in […]]]>

A property in Finley Street Church has changed ownership.

The Jacksonville Community Christian Church, located at 405 Finley Street, decided to close and a small church took over the property.

Jacksonville Bible Church took possession of the property in early August.

The Jacksonville Bible Church began in November 2019 and the church was meeting in the recital hall at MacMurray College, Pastor Andrew Lafferty said.

Lafferty said the Jacksonville Bible Church was looking for another place to meet after the college announced it was closing last year.

“We prayed for six months to find a building to use,” Lafferty said.

The Jacksonville Bible Church connected with the Jacksonville Community Christian Church and shared the building for 18 months, he said.

Starting next month, Jacksonville Bible Church will be the only church there.

“We are pleased to announce that the Jacksonville Bible Church will continue to use our church to lead a gospel-centered ministry in our community. We are grateful that our neighborhood continues to be blessed with the presence of a healthy church in this neighborhood for years to come, ”Jacksonville Community Christian Church said in a statement.

The buildings and property were sold to Jacksonville Bible Church for $ 1,000, Lafferty said. The Jacksonville Community Christian Church had been looking for someone to share the building for three years.

“We are very grateful for that,” he said.

The Jacksonville Bible Church was grateful that it was able to move into a building that had everything already set up, such as a nursery, ministry offices, and a place of worship. It is a “great blessing,” he said.

This month, the Jacksonville Community Christian Church invited people to Sunday worship to celebrate the life of the Jacksonville Community Christian Church.

Sunday is the last day that the Jacksonville Community Christian Church will be open before closing.


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