Church Community – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 06:21:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Community – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 Church Events 1-6-22 | Local religion https://kcacm.org/church-events-1-6-22-local-religion/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/church-events-1-6-22-local-religion/ Prayer meeting – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., has prayer meetings at 9:30 am on Sundays. Bring or send your prayer requests via SMS to 419-564-8383. Live in a free group – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main Street, Living Free Group Covering Anger: Master or Servant? at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in […]]]>

Prayer meeting – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., has prayer meetings at 9:30 am on Sundays. Bring or send your prayer requests via SMS to 419-564-8383.

Live in a free group – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main Street, Living Free Group Covering Anger: Master or Servant? at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in January at the church.

Watching the program – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., will present “The Chosen” on Sundays at 6 p.m.

Free throw competition – The annual Knights of Columbus youth free throw competition will be held Sunday at the Defiance K of C Hall, 111 Elliott Road. Registration begins at noon and the contest at 1:00 p.m. The competition is open to young people aged 9 to 14 (as of January 1, 2022) and there is no registration fee. Participants must bring a copy of their birth certificate and the signature of an authorized adult to participate. For more information, contact Rex Eutsler at 782-3417 or Mike Boff at 782-2405.

Food distribution – Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., will be hosting pantry hours on January 15 from noon to 3 pm. For more information, send an SMS to 419-564-8383.

(NOTICE TO CHURCHES: Any events that require an admission, food, or material fee may be included in the church event listing above for $ 15 per week. To reserve a paid spot, contact CN Advertising Department at 419-784-5441, ext. 300726, or by email: nhale@crescent-news.com Free events or those with a voluntary donation will be published free of charge. church, call 419-784-5441, ext. 300737, or email: tmcdonough@crescent-news.com. for free and paid events is Tuesday at noon.)


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Branson Charity Forgives Patients’ Past Debts and Penalties | KOLR https://kcacm.org/branson-charity-forgives-patients-past-debts-and-penalties-kolr/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 04:55:36 +0000 https://kcacm.org/branson-charity-forgives-patients-past-debts-and-penalties-kolr/ BRANSON, Mo. – The Faith Community Health board of directors has declared 2022 the “Year of Jubilee” for their organization, forgiving past debts and patient penalty charges at their clinic. “The decision to write off all past debts underscores our mission to provide caring, compassionate care tocommunity, ”said Tom Willcox, chairman of the board of […]]]>

BRANSON, Mo. – The Faith Community Health board of directors has declared 2022 the “Year of Jubilee” for their organization, forgiving past debts and patient penalty charges at their clinic.

“The decision to write off all past debts underscores our mission to provide caring, compassionate care to
community, ”said Tom Willcox, chairman of the board of directors of FCH and pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Branson.

“Our Board of Directors realized that the disciplinary charge was preventing people from re-engaging with the clinic and had an additional impact on their health and therefore on their quality of life,” said Anne E. McGregor, Director Acting General of FCH. “We have seen time and time again that when men and women find affordable, quality housing for their health and medication needs, they are able to live better lives; committed to their families and communities.

The owners of Pasghettis Restaurant and Attraction, Babette and Nolan Fogle, donated the funds to pay off the clinic’s previously unpaid balance.

“We admire the work of Faith Community Health, the void they fill in our community is real and necessary. I didn’t hesitate for a second when I realized what the “Jubilee Year” was like, ”said Babette Fogle, board member of Faith Community Health.


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Church-Community Connection: 2022: Time for a personal reset? | Online features https://kcacm.org/church-community-connection-2022-time-for-a-personal-reset-online-features/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/church-community-connection-2022-time-for-a-personal-reset-online-features/ PActor Bill Johnson says, “We have to stay childish. Children don’t dream of being insignificant. We must remember this in these crazy and absurd times. Children begin to see life beautifully and innocently. But ultimately life reaches them, shapes them, holds them back, and hurts them. Very often, temporary negatives turn into permanent negatives, and […]]]>

PActor Bill Johnson says, “We have to stay childish. Children don’t dream of being insignificant. We must remember this in these crazy and absurd times. Children begin to see life beautifully and innocently. But ultimately life reaches them, shapes them, holds them back, and hurts them. Very often, temporary negatives turn into permanent negatives, and lives are spent searching for meaning in the wrong places.

Recently I found a short story that my son Matthew wrote when he was about 10 years old. It illustrates how children do not dream of being insignificant. The story is called “The Bass”. If you think anglers have big fish stories, wait until you read Matt’s fish story:

“One day I went fishing with my dad at Big Daddy Lake. However, this lake does not take its name from an old fog. No, it has bass the size of the state of Alaska. Okay, anyway, I was using a crankbait as big as my head, and I threw it about twenty feet. I stung the fish. It was a little dinky bass.

While dad was thinking about how I caught him on my hipper size crankbait, I threw my lure again at a large boulder. This rock was not a pebble. It was a huge boulder crushing bones. Well, I started to roll it up, and I felt a nibble. WWWWAAAHHHH !!!! Dad! Mast! AAAHH! SPLASH!!! Blurb, Blurb.

Then I saw him. It was huge! He dragged me through the grass and the rocks. (The rocky part hurt me.) Then I saw a tree, grabbed it, and hung on for life. I started winding the bass. Finally, I approached him close enough to grab him. Bad idea on my part. Weeeeeeee! It was awesome. I saw the boat. I grabbed the boat and the fish and got in.

I told daddy to take the “weigher”. The bass weighed 600 pounds. Dad and I went back to the fishing pier and I won the bass tournament. Then we got home and sat down to think about how I had done. Dad always acts a little weird. I think it damaged his brain to think I caught a bass bigger than him. The end.”

Well you just looked through the eyes of Matthew, who has a big imagination and an even more positive attitude.

As Pastor Johnson said, kids don’t dream of being insignificant, especially 10-year-old Matt. It hurts us adults, mentally and emotionally, to hate, complain, become hurt, bitter, cynical, or lose our joy. It’s even worse to lose our confidence and our perspective as children. Friedrich Nietzsche said: “He who fights too long against dragons becomes himself a dragon. The most brutal prison to escape may be the spirit.

Jesus addressed this idea in Matthew: 18. He wanted people who lived through dark times to look at life through the eyes of a child. Jesus didn’t mean they should be childish. Instead, he suggested that in order to enter the kingdom of God, we must become confident as a child. Otherwise, complex adult problems like the ones mentioned will cripple us. For the pure, everything is pure.

When truth, simplicity, and purity come, dragons can no longer see good or God. They lose trust in God, and they lose their perspective. God is there, but they cannot see God at work on their behalf.

Wise but confident people see God in both good and bad. Mature Christ followers and people see God in the pleasures and palaces and courtyards and stables of life. When the wise follow a star and find a stable, they seek God in the stable and find him. It takes to see things as God sees them by looking through the eyes of a child.

God chose to become a baby, not a “dazzling” form of a king, politician, or artist. But, over time, this baby turned out to be more powerful than the entire Roman Empire. John Maxwell wrote about this truth from a writer written many years ago. Read on:

“A century ago, men followed Napoleon’s march with bated breath and eagerly awaited news of the war. And all the time, while they were in their house, babies were born. But who could think of babies? Everyone was thinking of the battles.

“In a year he stole a host of heroes from the world. Gladstone was born in Liverpool, England, and Tennyson in Somersby. Oliver Wendell Holmes was born in Massachusetts. On the same day of the same year, Charles Darwin made his debut at Shrewsbury. Abraham Lincoln drew his first breath in old Kentucky, and the birth of Felix Mendelssohn enriched music in Hamburg.

“But nobody was thinking about babies. Everyone was thinking of the battles. Yet which of the battles of 1809 counted more than the babies born in 1809? When an evil wants to be fixed, or a truth wants to be taught, or a continent wants to open up, God sends a child to do it.

So what does “childish” look like to us adults and adolescents?

“Trust God from the bottom of your heart; don’t try to figure it all out on your own. Hear the voice of God in everything you do, wherever you go. God is the one who will keep you on track. Don’t assume you know everything, run to God, not God. Proverbs 3: 5-7.

This 2022, birth of the baby from a personal reset. Don’t let current events rob you of the awe and wonder of life. The year is new, why not you too.


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South Africa Pays Tribute to ‘Moral Giant’ Tutu https://kcacm.org/south-africa-pays-tribute-to-moral-giant-tutu/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:40:29 +0000 https://kcacm.org/south-africa-pays-tribute-to-moral-giant-tutu/ By Andrew Meldrum | Associated press CAPE TOWN, South Africa – On Friday, South Africans from all over the ‘Rainbow Nation’ of retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu marched past his plain pine casket to pay homage to his life activism for the equality of all races, beliefs and sexual orientations. “He was a moral giant. He […]]]>

By Andrew Meldrum | Associated press

CAPE TOWN, South Africa – On Friday, South Africans from all over the ‘Rainbow Nation’ of retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu marched past his plain pine casket to pay homage to his life activism for the equality of all races, beliefs and sexual orientations.

“He was a moral giant. He was a moral and spiritual giant loved and revered for fighting for the equality of all, ”said Reverend Michael Lapsley, on the steps of historic St. George’s Cathedral after Tutu’s coffin was carried in the middle music, incense and prayers.

Anglican clergy – women and men, black and white, young and old – lined the streets to honor the procession carrying Tutu’s body to church. Members of the Tutu family accompanied the coffin into the cathedral.

People started parading through the High Cathedral to light candles and see the simple little coffin with rope handles that Tutu said he wanted to avoid ostentation or lavish expense. Many sat on the benches to pray and reflect on Tutu’s life.

More than 2,000 people visited the cathedral on the first day of the visit Thursday and Friday, the line stretched for more than a kilometer (almost a mile). A requiem mass for Tutu will be held on New Years Day before he is cremated and his remains are placed in a columbarium in the cathedral.

“His work did not stop with the end of apartheid,” said Lapsley, referring to the racially oppressive regime in South Africa which Tutu strongly opposed and which ended in 1994 when the South Africa held democratic elections.

“Archbishop Tutu courageously stood up for equality for all. He transformed the church by bringing women into the clergy. He has stood up for the LGBTQ community, for which he is a hero around the world, ”said Lapsley, Canon of Healing at the Cathedral.

An anti-apartheid militant priest whose hands and one eye were gouged out by a letter bomb sent by South African agents in 1994, Lapsley said Tutu had helped him find reconciliation and a new role in the church.

One of the first women priests ordained by Tutu, Reverend Wilma Jakobsen, said Tutu radically changed the Anglican Church in South Africa.

“The face of the church has changed. It has women priests and women in leadership positions. There are people of all colors. Our church welcomes LGBTQ people. This is all thanks to the leadership of Archbishop Tutu, ”said Jakobsen, who was Tutu’s personal chaplain when he was Archbishop.

During the height of apartheid, Tutu mixed all races in the church, Jakobsen said.

“I was intentionally placed in Mitchells Plain and other white priests were intentionally placed in black communities. And black priests were intentionally placed in white communities, ”Jakobsen said. “Archbishop Tutu didn’t wait for approval to do it, he just did. It was a direct challenge to the apartheid regime.

Among those who viewed Tutu’s coffin on Friday was Mohamed De Bruyn.

“It was very emotional for me,” said De Bruyn. “I could feel his great soul in that little wooden box… He was like Moses. He took our nation out of all this sadness and sorrow. “

Vuyo Wara said Tutu “was a great leader. He fought corruption. I just hope that our current leaders will take over from him and follow his principles in the future. ”

After viewing on Friday, Tutu’s body will be left alone overnight in the cathedral, “a place he loved,” according to a statement from Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba.

The cathedral, the oldest Anglican church in southern Africa, dating from 1847, is a testament to the changes encouraged by Tutu. The Crypt Memory and Witness Center offers public education programs to encourage healing and social justice.

The graceful stone structure built by British colonialists under Table Mountain in Cape Town has been converted by Tutu into a center of anti-apartheid activity. When the apartheid regime banned political gatherings, Tutu held meetings in the cathedral where attendees ostensibly bowed their heads to pray and hear political speeches. Nelson Mandela called it the “cathedral of the people”.

With her gray hair pulled back in a purple tinted ponytail and wearing a brightly colored rainbow mask, Reverend Maria Claassen said she was paying homage to Tutu.

“He was a very humble man, but sitting in the same room with him, you could feel the strength of his presence, of his beliefs,” said Claassen, an Anglican priest from the Durbanville region of Cape Town. “He inspired us and now we celebrate his life. “


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Black pastor remembered for building unity and raising others at Green Bay funeral https://kcacm.org/black-pastor-remembered-for-building-unity-and-raising-others-at-green-bay-funeral/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 23:33:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/black-pastor-remembered-for-building-unity-and-raising-others-at-green-bay-funeral/ GREEN BAY, WB (WBAY) – The music played inside the Divine Temple of God in Christ church created an atmosphere of celebration rather than mourning for Lesley Carroll Green. “Thank you, thank you Jesus. My soul life, ”sang her niece Ka-Ree Green at her uncle’s funeral on Wednesday. The pews of Divine Temple Church were […]]]>

GREEN BAY, WB (WBAY) – The music played inside the Divine Temple of God in Christ church created an atmosphere of celebration rather than mourning for Lesley Carroll Green.

“Thank you, thank you Jesus. My soul life, ”sang her niece Ka-Ree Green at her uncle’s funeral on Wednesday.

The pews of Divine Temple Church were filled with people paying their last respects to Pastor LC Green. Face masks were worn by all present.

“Pastor Green has called us here to celebrate his life,” said officiating Superintendent Raymond Davis.

In the church, Green was remembered as a unifier, someone who brought together people from diverse backgrounds. Personal stories were shared of how he spent time at the YMCA to help fill his benches.

“Every day I was in this office with him, obtaining nothing but wisdom,” said Deacon Terry Cook. “He taught me to be a man, not an adult. He taught me how to treat my children.

Cook says it’s because of Green that he’s been sober for 13 years.

Church members say Green established the first black church in Green Bay, building a spiritual beacon for African Americans.

“It was very important in the fact that a lot of the things that we needed in the community, he was trying to see that we had them,” said Sharon Harper. She has been a member of the church for 22 years.

Harper says Green was forward looking and mentored many church members, supporting their efforts to engage with the community. One example is a basketball tournament organized with police officers.

“He was the father of many of us who didn’t have a father. That’s what he was to me. He was my father. I don’t want to get too emotional and start crying because I loved her so much.

Green has also helped build relationships and ease tensions between members of the African American community and the city police department. Mayor Eric Genrich reflected on the pastor’s impact at the joint council meeting last week.

“[This] is just a huge loss, unfortunately, for this community and for many of us personally, ”said Genrich.

Copyright 2021 WBAY. All rights reserved.


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Hi-Crest Fellowship Church restructures budget to pay for rapid tests https://kcacm.org/hi-crest-fellowship-church-restructures-budget-to-pay-for-rapid-tests/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/hi-crest-fellowship-church-restructures-budget-to-pay-for-rapid-tests/ TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – After a weekend of holiday gatherings and many more to come with the New Years this weekend, many Kansans left on Monday to take a COVID-19 test. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) told 13 NEWS that 1,963 tests were carried out at their sites on Monday. This represents […]]]>

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – After a weekend of holiday gatherings and many more to come with the New Years this weekend, many Kansans left on Monday to take a COVID-19 test.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) told 13 NEWS that 1,963 tests were carried out at their sites on Monday.

This represents an increase from the highest number of tests performed each day of the past week at 1,973.

“Right now I’ve been around people and if I have it I want them to know as soon as possible,” said Barbara Moore, a Topeka resident who took a test at the KDHE testing site. at Hummer Sports Park on Monday.

Shawnee Co. health manager Dr Erin Locke said with recent holiday gatherings now is the time to get tested.

“There is an opportunity for a lot to spread from person to person and symptoms develop over the last few days,” she said.

The pressure is already strong to test the sites in the region.

Fellowship Hi-Crest Church is a community site.

Church servant pastor Jonathan Sublet said he asked fast tests faster than the rate the state can provide.

“We said, we’re going to take money out of other areas of our operating budget and we’re going to start buying tests on the Internet,” he explained.

“We finally got our first shipment from the state and we saw these go quickly, and then as part of that we said we were going to keep buying tests to supplement what the state is giving us. “

Sublet initially said her team tried to buy what they could at drugstores, but those stores frequently ran out of stock.

He said online orders have a limit on how much buyers can buy.

He said meeting the needs of the community comes with sacrifices.

“In a case like ours in a small church on a tight budget, there isn’t much we can do to keep spending money on this,” he said.

“It means there are ways we were going to help the community in other ways that we need to step back.”

However, he said it was worth the work to help those in need.

“You start where you are, you use what you have, you do what you can for as long as you can. “

Dr Locke said those who wish to test should get tested three to five days after the initial exposure.

Symptomatic people should get tested immediately.

Copyright 2021 WIBW. All rights reserved.


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Akron connections, partnerships raise multiple groups: Betty Lin-Fisher https://kcacm.org/akron-connections-partnerships-raise-multiple-groups-betty-lin-fisher/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 11:30:49 +0000 https://kcacm.org/akron-connections-partnerships-raise-multiple-groups-betty-lin-fisher/ In the spirit of the holidays, here’s a story about community, giving and giving back. Earlier this year, I was already in awe of our community, as evidenced by the generosity featured in several columns I wrote as part of The Beacon Journal’s Health Disparities Project. Today my community pride collapses further as I can […]]]>

In the spirit of the holidays, here’s a story about community, giving and giving back.

Earlier this year, I was already in awe of our community, as evidenced by the generosity featured in several columns I wrote as part of The Beacon Journal’s Health Disparities Project.

Today my community pride collapses further as I can share more good news and fun connections and partnerships created as a result of the project.

Readers may recall that The Beacon Journal received $ 3,000 in grants that I won as part of a Health Reporting Grant and assembled a community panel of judges in late 2019 to donate the money. to grassroots groups working to solve the problem of racism as public health publish. Readers responded by donating their own money to advance the cause, and we ended up donating over $ 10,000 to organizations.

Betty lin-fisher

Betty Lin-Fisher: Miracles on Wheels Donates Cars to Break Cycle of Poverty and Disparity

One of the project’s winners, Miracles on Wheels, has enjoyed great community support since we first featured Harvey Bryant, Sr. and his wife, Michelle.

Through their popular ministry, Miracle on Wheels, Harvey has quietly repaired and donated cars to friends and strangers. Harvey has no formal auto repair experience, so he relies on YouTube and the skills he has learned.


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Church’s Cookie Walk Raises Fund for Community | Local https://kcacm.org/churchs-cookie-walk-raises-fund-for-community-local/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/churchs-cookie-walk-raises-fund-for-community-local/ A church fundraiser provided friendly faces and goodies for a good cause. The 15th St. United Methodist Church held its annual cookie walk and soup sale on Saturday, December 11, starting at 9 a.m. For $ 9, participants could fill Styrofoam containers with as many cookies as they wanted. Members of the congregation prepared dozens […]]]>

A church fundraiser provided friendly faces and goodies for a good cause.

The 15th St. United Methodist Church held its annual cookie walk and soup sale on Saturday, December 11, starting at 9 a.m.

For $ 9, participants could fill Styrofoam containers with as many cookies as they wanted. Members of the congregation prepared dozens of cookies for the event.

The tables were set up in a U-shape in the basement of the church so that participants could form neat lines. There was a separate table for cookies containing nuts.

There were three types of soup all made in the approved church kitchen, selling out within the first 30 minutes.

“We wanted to have more types, but there were some restrictions,” said Pastor Barbara Servello.

Host Mike Knott said the congregation was looking forward to revisiting the event. Due to the pandemic, they were unable to do so last year.

“It’s one of the church’s most popular projects,” he said. “I think this has been going on for about 15 years now.”

As a safety measure, participants and volunteers wore masks and gloves during the event. The volunteers put the cookies in the boxes for the participants.

Volunteer Beverly Reitenbaugh said the event was one of her favorites

“It brings the community together,” she said. “It’s such a fun time to work with others and also to eat delicious cookies.”

Servello, dressed as an elf, said seeing people come out was a blessing.

“It was something that people were looking forward to,” she said. “We are happy to be here.”

All the money raised went into the church’s charity fund, which meant everything would go to the community in one way or another.

“This money will go to firefighters and the Salvation Army to help provide fuel to people,” Servello said. “It will also help with other needs they may have.”

For the event, volunteers began to settle in at 7 a.m. Trudy McElwain said it was a great bonding event.

“Working with parishioners is always a fantastic time,” she said. “All of this warms my heart.

Knott said that because the pandemic shut down so much last year, the Cookie Walk may have been one of the first times people walked out in a year.

“They might be able to see friends they haven’t seen for a long time,” he said.

At the end of the day, the church raised a total of $ 948. Not counting the volunteers, there were about 60 participants.

“As a fundraiser, he provides the necessary funding that people need,” Knott said. “As an event, it offers an equally important fellowship and interpersonal connection. “


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Janet C. Marshall | News, Sports, Jobs https://kcacm.org/janet-c-marshall-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 05:26:05 +0000 https://kcacm.org/janet-c-marshall-news-sports-jobs/ Janet C. Marshall, 95, of Colonial Courtyard, formerly of Warriors Mark, died Monday. She was born to Warriors Mark, the daughter of Marvin Leon and Mary Oleta (Davis) Cox. In October 1949, at Warriors Mark United Methodist Church, she married Jesse William Marshall. He died in January 2002. The sons who survive, Jesse “Craig” and […]]]>

Janet C. Marshall, 95, of Colonial Courtyard, formerly of Warriors Mark, died Monday. She was born to Warriors Mark, the daughter of Marvin Leon and Mary Oleta (Davis) Cox.

In October 1949, at Warriors Mark United Methodist Church, she married Jesse William Marshall. He died in January 2002.

The sons who survive, Jesse “Craig” and his wife, Patricia, Marshall of Warriors Mark and Rodney Leon Marshall of Warriors Mark; one daughter, Karen M. Stuart of Pittsburgh; grandsons: Andrew and his wife, Amanda, Marshall, Caleb and his wife, Lyndsay, Marshall and Jesse, Eli and his wife, Carly, Marshall, all of Warriors Mark; great-grandchildren: Caleb Dillon, Adalee Grace, Kaylin Ray and Madison Grace; and a sister, Mary Lynne Mellot of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Janet was a graduate of Warriors Mark-Franklin High School and Penn State University. She and her late husband were longtime dairy farmers at Warriors Mark and she was a substitute teacher. Janet was a member of the Upper Spruce Creek Presbyterian Church and was very active in church and community activities. She loved being with her family and friends.

There will be a private family service with a celebration of life to be announced at a later date. Interment will take place in Burket cemetery.

Memorial donations are to be made to Upper Spruce Creek Presbyterian Church, 2620 Spruce Creek Road, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA 16865; Burket c / o Andrew Marshall Cemetery, 2054 Hickory Ridge Road, Warriors Mark, PA 16877; or Warriors Mark-Franklin Vol. Fire Company, PO Box 104, Warriors Mark, PA 16877.

Arrangements are made by Bruce E. Cox Funeral Home.

www.bruceecoxfh.com


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McAfee graduate drives change through role as pastor https://kcacm.org/mcafee-graduate-drives-change-through-role-as-pastor/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/mcafee-graduate-drives-change-through-role-as-pastor/ Carrie Veal is pictured with one of the children at her church and outside her church, Myers Park Baptist in Charlotte, North Carolina. Carrie Veal’s call to ministry was a “mixture of Jesus and challenge,” accompanied by a strong desire to effect change. The 2003 McAfee School of Theology graduate is now the Executive Minister […]]]>

Carrie Veal is pictured with one of the children at her church and outside her church, Myers Park Baptist in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Carrie Veal’s call to ministry was a “mixture of Jesus and challenge,” accompanied by a strong desire to effect change.

The 2003 McAfee School of Theology graduate is now the Executive Minister of Community and Engagement at Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina, where she works to empower and engage the faithful and to help them form meaningful relationships.

Growing up, Veal always wanted to be a lawyer, so she began her graduate studies as a double major in History and English at Stetson University. But in the first year, she realized that ministry was the way for her and opted for religious studies.

Growing up in the South without seeing women in leadership positions in the church, she didn’t know what that job would look like for her. But as people started to challenge her and tell her that she couldn’t be a pastor because she was a woman, she felt the attraction of the ministry more and more.

“I entered seminary knowing that I wanted to minister to the local congregation, and then my desire increased because I knew I wanted to be an instrument of change,” she said. “I didn’t have the noble, sincere reasons for it. For me, that’s the only way to do it. I have always had this drive. I knew I was going to do it differently, and I knew I would do it from a gender perspective. For me it has been a really interesting journey. My calling to ministry has not changed, but the way I live is constantly changing.

At McAfee, Veal learned to work as a team, discovered the best ways to interact with devotees, and forged deep connections with people she still connects with today. She learned to connect spiritually with her peers, which paved the way for her to do so as a minister.

Carrie Veal

“(McAfee) had a huge impact on me,” she said. “For me, it was a lot more about community and classroom conversations than academic work. The academic work was amazing and great, but I think back more to how I watched professors engage with students and students engage with students. McAfee has been three of the most wonderful years of my life.

After graduation, Veal served as associate pastor in children’s ministry at First Baptist Gainesville, Georgia for five years, and then at Morningside Baptist Church in Spartanburg, SC, for four years. Sensing it was time for a change, she moved to Myers Park Baptist in May 2014. She started as a children’s minister and gradually took on more responsibility until she became the executive minister of community engagement. earlier this year.

“Over time, staff and lay leaders started asking me questions about my gifts, passions and interests, and my role expanded,” she said. “Nothing was taken off my plate. I just added more things. It’s been fun living in this new role in a place that understands me, and I understand them. It has been a good business.

Veal is Minister of Children and Minister of Community Life, where she works with guests, new members, small groups, deacons, leaders, and the ministry board. She focuses a lot on member engagement and creating an inviting environment. She has started to further develop staff leadership and hopes to expand this in the future.

“I like to empower volunteers to be the best they can be themselves,” she said. “Equipping them in whatever area they serve – hospitality, teaching, event planning – means that I am doing my part to give them a wonderful experience. I love teaching children and adults, helping them learn something new about God, the world and themselves. I am energized when I connect people with each other, helping to build new relationships. Working with staff and volunteers, I love hearing their stories, discovering what energizes them, and then finding ways to engage those passions.

The senior church minister does a lot of work around racial reconciliation and has designed a nine-week course, which Veal has helped spread to the world. So far, over 300 people across the country have participated in the training, primarily through Zoom, and Veal has helped organize the course’s first conference at the church in November. The program is expected to be published by Upper Room next year.

Veal no longer feels like she has to prove something as a female pastor, and she has focused on other things that she has become more aware of. Her job comes with its fair share of challenges, but those hardships can also bring some of the biggest rewards, she said.

“I realized how each part of the ministry really has an impact on the other,” she said. “I started to realize what really matters. People can come to church because they like the sermon or the music, but it’s the bonds that keep them going.

She strives to learn throughout her life and constantly strives to adapt her knowledge to her ministry and to help others apply these lessons to their own lives. She came to see that it is normal not always to know the answers, despite this expectation.

“I never want to stop learning. I never want to stop being curious, ”she said. “I never want to feel like I have the answers to everything because then where is the mystery?” Even with all the things we know, there are still some things that are mysterious. I never want to lose this.

The McAfee School of Theology was founded 25 years ago on the Mercer campus in Atlanta. The shared lair alumni profiles throughout the year to mark this milestone anniversary.


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