Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:08:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 NOTE IN YOUR CALENDAR: Upcoming Events in the Danville Area | Lifestyles https://kcacm.org/note-in-your-calendar-upcoming-events-in-the-danville-area-lifestyles/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/note-in-your-calendar-upcoming-events-in-the-danville-area-lifestyles/ Because this section is free, community events can be organized depending on the space available. Articles on religion are posted on the Saturday church page. Email events to news@registerbee.com. SATURDAY JAN. 8 COUNTRY BREAKFAST: VFW Post 647 will host a country breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. for $ 7 per person. For more […]]]>

Because this section is free, community events can be organized depending on the space available. Articles on religion are posted on the Saturday church page. Email events to news@registerbee.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 8

COUNTRY BREAKFAST: VFW Post 647 will host a country breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. for $ 7 per person. For more information, call 434-822-0042.

COVID-19 VACCINE CLINIC: The Pittsylvania-Danville Health District of the Virginia Department of Health will be hosting a 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Johnson Elementary School, 680 Arnett Blvd., Danville. The clinic will offer a first, second, primary and additional booster doses at no cost to the public. The Moderna vaccine and the Johnson & Johnson single dose vaccine are available for anyone 18 years of age and over. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is available to anyone 5 years of age and older. A parent or guardian must accompany anyone under the age of 18. Register in advance at vase.vdh.virginia.gov.

People also read …

  • UPDATE: Pittsylvania County Administrator Fired, New Board Struck With Record Supervisor Censorship Last Year Calling It ‘Politically Conducted’
  • Pittsylvania County staff again mourn loss of employee to COVID-19
  • Cat hit by car, left for dead, finds new life and returns home after Christmas Eve surgery
  • Police search for suspect after guns stolen from Danville pawnshop; $ 6,000 reward offered
  • Danville gambling addict gets 8 years in prison for robbing 19 stores in Virginia and North Carolina
  • UPDATE: From record high to winter storm warning, welcome to a crazy weather adventure in the Dan River area
  • In Danville, 2022 will be a year of transformation projects with the construction of a casino, the renovation of White Mill
  • Sovah Health-Danville officials urge residents not to go to emergency room for COVID-19 tests
  • New Chairman of Pittsylvania County Supervisory Board on Trustee Firing: “It was time for him to leave”
  • With funding in place for Danville Waterfront Park, construction could start to cause a stir in the summer
  • Real estate transfers in the Dan River area
  • NOON UPDATE: 6,000 customers without electricity, roads covered after 2-inch snowfall in the Danville area
  • Longtime Gretna city manager dies
  • The Dan River region’s winter punch is quickly fading as the sun rises, but black ice is a danger Tuesday morning
  • COVID-19 infections on the rise in the Dan River region

REGISTRATION EVENT: Danville Community College will be hosting an enrollment event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to provide weekend access to those who wish to apply and register for spring semester courses. The event will include admissions support, financial aid and counseling. Those interested can use this period as a “one-stop-shop” to get started with CDC. For more information about Danville Community College, or to apply, visit danville.edu.

THURSDAY JAN. 13

PITTSYLVANIA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS: The Pittsylvania County Democratic Committee will hold a caucus at the Greater Triumph Baptist Church, 477 Fairview Road, Chatham, to elect committee members for 2022 and 2023. Doors will open at 6:30 pm and close at 7 pm.

FRIDAY JAN. 14

SCLC YOUTH EVENING: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Danville and Pittsylvania County Chapter, will host Youth Night from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Southside Community Learning Center, 524 Chatham Ave., Danville, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.

SATURDAY JAN. 15

CARS & COFFEE: Old Dominion Classic Sports Car Club will be holding Cars & Coffee from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Cream & Vine, 1009 Main Street. For more information, call 434-548-9862. The group meets every three Saturdays.

MARTIN LUTHER KING BANQUET: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference will host its annual Martin Luther King Banquet at the Stratford Courtyard Conference Center at 6 p.m. The ticket donation is $ 30. For more information, contact Rev. William A. Keen at 434-489-3114.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Sons of the American Legion 325 Squadron will be holding their monthly all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Station 325 at a cost of $ 6.

COVID-19 VACCINE CLINIC: The Pittsylvania-Danville Health District of the Virginia Department of Health will be hosting a 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Park Avenue Elementary School, 661 Park Ave., Danville. The clinic will offer a first, second, primary and additional booster doses at no cost to the public. The Moderna vaccine and the Johnson & Johnson single dose vaccine are available for anyone 18 years of age and over. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is available to anyone 5 years of age and older. A parent or guardian must accompany anyone under the age of 18. Register in advance at vase.vdh.virginia.gov.

SUNDAY JAN. 16

STOP THE MARKET AT KILLED CANDLES: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference will hold its annual Stop the Killing Candlelight Walk in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. starting at 5:30 p.m. at Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 2232 North Main St. (assembly time is 5:00 p.m.). The group will cross the MLK Bridge to the JLT Fountain in downtown Danville. All organizations and churches are invited to join with banners.

SATURDAY JAN. 22

CONCERT FROM THE AVERETT FACULTY: Averett Faculty Concert at 7 p.m. at the Sanctuary of West Main Baptist Church. Free entry.

MONDAY JAN. 24

CHRONIC PAIN AND ILLNESS SUPPORT GROUP: Meetings are held from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Monday at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church.

SATURDAY JAN. 29

FREE HOT DOG SERVICE AND LUNCH: Trinity United Methodist Church, 409 Arnett Blvd., will be holding an indoor prayer and worship service from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and a hot dog lunch from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 17

PIERRE AND THE STARCATCHER: “Peter and the Starcatcher “will be presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 p.m. at the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Center of Fine Arts. Tickets cost $ 10 for adults and $ 8 for students. / elderly (60 years and over).

FRIDAY, FEB. 18

PIERRE AND THE STARCATCHER: “Peter and the Starcatcher “will be presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 p.m. at the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Center of Fine Arts. Tickets cost $ 10 for adults and $ 8 for students. / elderly (60 years and over).

SATURDAY, FEB. 19

PIERRE AND THE STARCATCHER: “Peter and the Starcatcher “will be presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 p.m. at the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Center of Fine Arts. Tickets cost $ 10 for adults and $ 8 for students. / elderly (60 years and over).

THURSDAY 7 APRIL

CRAZY IN LOVE: “Head over Heels” is a jukebox musical presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 PM in the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Fine Arts Center. The cost of tickets is $ 10 for adults and $ 8 for students / seniors (60 years and over).

FRIDAY 8 APRIL

CRAZY IN LOVE: “Head over Heels” is a jukebox musical presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 PM in the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Fine Arts Center. The cost of tickets is $ 10 for adults; $ 8 students / seniors (60 years and over).

SATURDAY APRIL 9

CRAZY IN LOVE: “Head over Heels” is a jukebox musical presented by the Averett Theater Department at 7:00 PM in the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Fine Arts Center. The cost of tickets is $ 10 for adults; $ 8 students / seniors (60 years and over).

SUNDAY APRIL 10

CRAZY IN LOVE: “Head over Heels” is a jukebox musical presented by the Averett Theater Department at 2 pm in the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Fine Arts Center. The cost of tickets is $ 10 for adults; $ 8 students / seniors (60 years and over).

FRIDAY APRIL 22

AVERETT UNIVERSITY COUGAR BAND SPRING CONCERT: The Averett University Cougar Band Spring Concert will be held at 7:00 p.m. in the Pritchett Auditorium at the Violet T. Frith Fine Arts Center. Free entry.

SUNDAY 24 APRIL

AVERETT SINGERS SPRING CONCERT: The Averett Singers Spring Concert will take place at 2:30 pm in the Pritchett Auditorium of the Violet T. Frith Art Center. Free entry.

IN PROGRESS

MALE CANCER SURVIVORS REQUIRED FOR A SOCIAL SURVEY: The Commonwealth University of Virginia and the Cancer Research and Resource Centers are conducting a social media survey and experiences as a male cancer survivor in rural Virginia. Anyone is eligible if they are a male prostate cancer or colorectal cancer survivor, 21 years of age or older, completed cancer treatment, and reside in rural Virginia. Participants will receive a gift card. If you are interested, contact the Cancer Research and Resource Center in Danville at 434-791-5205.


Source link

]]>
Pink Sullivan herring | Obituary https://kcacm.org/pink-sullivan-herring-obituary/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:17:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/pink-sullivan-herring-obituary/ Rose Herring passed away in the wee hours of the morning on January 3, 2022, having lived the last 68 of her 93 years in North Wilkesboro. She was born Bertha Rozelia Sullivan, the fifth of six children to Sam and Bertha Sullivan, sharecroppers in eastern North Carolina, outside of “Little Washington”. Rose’s father died […]]]>

Rose Herring passed away in the wee hours of the morning on January 3, 2022, having lived the last 68 of her 93 years in North Wilkesboro. She was born Bertha Rozelia Sullivan, the fifth of six children to Sam and Bertha Sullivan, sharecroppers in eastern North Carolina, outside of “Little Washington”.

Rose’s father died when she was 3, and she and four of her siblings grew up at the Masonic Home for Children in Oxford. Peanut, as she was called, had an independent mind and was on the “list of kids who behaved badly” on Saturday nights every week. She told stories about how she only wore shoes in the summer to walk the mile to church and how her feet hurt when she got home. She however remained forever grateful to the Masons for the opportunity to grow up with her siblings, and

had fond memories of his time there.

As a teenager, she returned home and graduated from Bath High School. When the president of Atlantic Christian College came to speak at his school, Rose told him about her intention to go to college. He told her that if she wanted it enough, to come over and they would find a way. She accepted the offer. After graduating from high school, she packed a suitcase, got on a three-hour Greyhound bus ride, and showed up at the President’s office to ask to attend. It enabled her to graduate and helped her find a job as a secretary to reimburse her tuition fees after graduation.

President Hilley is another person Rose was grateful for. While working, Rose lived with her Aunt Cottie in Wilson and walked to the corner each morning to catch a bus to work. Leonard herring

was staying at a boarding house there for a week, as part of his work with Dunn and Bradstreet. From his window he saw her walk to the bus and liked what he saw. One day, he “found himself” on the sidewalk as she passed and offered to take her away. Rose said no thanks, but after her aunt learned more about him, and he asked her again, she accepted a ride. It was the start of the love of his life.

Rose and Leonard were married and had two children when Leonard responded to a newspaper ad for an accountant job in North Wilkesboro, with a growing small hardware store across the state from their families. When Leonard came for the interview, Rose sat in the car on a Saturday on 10th Street for several hours and cried; a lot to see there in 1955. He accepted the job and Rose said “it better be good!” ” It was. Leonard came to Wilkes first and Rose moved the household and kids on her 27th birthday.

She was a great advocate for her children and grandchildren, whether they were right or not. To treat one of them unfairly in his eyes was to be on his grudge list forever. But that didn’t stop her from suffering her own form of punishment once she got home. Rose enjoyed life. She and her sister, Em, did the handstand from the pool diving board when she was old enough to teach her grandchildren to do the same. Rose started tennis at mid-life, played regularly and won tournaments against much younger opponents. After she and Bev Cook won a local tournament, Leonard told everyone within earshot that Rose was older than the combined age of her partner and opponents. She never willingly let anyone win against her, not even her grandchildren. She didn’t stop playing until, at 83, she pursued a shot so vigorously that she fell and suffered a concussion. (When she woke up on the field, she just wanted to know if she had won the point.)

She was instrumental in building a first class library in Wilkes County, pursuing all aspects with passion. The fiery spirit Rose first displayed at the Masonic household has served her well in the fight for a cause she believed in. You would have to see her at a meeting of the county commissioner to find out what that means.

Rose was an excellent hostess and housewife. She loved her big garden and her plants, and she loved doing things for her family, nieces and nephews and friends. But above all, Rose was deeply and genuinely in love with Leonard until the end, as he was with her. Rose was her partner and support in her work and life, in the good times that could be great, and in the more difficult times shared later in life. At all times and in all circumstances, she was the wind under her wings.

Rose was predeceased by her husband and toddler son Lawrence Gregory and siblings Sam, Mabel, Weldon, Em and Dottie. She is survived by her children, Lee (Pam) and Sandra (Gary); grandchildren Greg, Mark, Andrew (Jade), Austin (Chelsea), Carson (Nathan) and Erika (Matt); and great-grandchildren she loved to see, Fox, Ezra, Parker, Adrian, Evan and Jake.

Rose’s independent attitude has served her well for 92 of her 93 years. For this past year, we will be eternally grateful and indebted to her most impressive team of caregivers who have become friends: Rosie, Jane, Kara, Denna, Audrey, Missy, Charlene and Deneen.

If you are inclined to donate on Rose’s behalf, please consider the Wilkes County Library, 215 10th St, North Wilkesboro, NC, 28659. Family will receive friends at First United Methodist Church, North Wilkesboro on Saturday January 19. 8, from noon to 1 p.m., followed by a service in the sanctuary at 1 p.m.

To plant a tree in memory of Rose Herring as a living tribute, please visit Tribute Store.


Source link

]]>
Today’s Events for January 1 | Entertainment https://kcacm.org/todays-events-for-january-1-entertainment/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:25:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/todays-events-for-january-1-entertainment/ SUNDAY Quakers (Religious Society of Friends) will hold virtual services on Sunday. Services are open to everyone and visitors are warmly welcomed. Silent worship begins at 10 a.m., followed by online fellowship for those who wish to linger. For more information and the Zoom link, call Brenda at 803-648-6020. MONDAY Aiken Women in Black and […]]]>

SUNDAY

Quakers (Religious Society of Friends) will hold virtual services on Sunday. Services are open to everyone and visitors are warmly welcomed. Silent worship begins at 10 a.m., followed by online fellowship for those who wish to linger. For more information and the Zoom link, call Brenda at 803-648-6020.

MONDAY

Aiken Women in Black and Moms Demand Action to organize vigil for peace and non-violence 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays at the entrance to Aiken Estates, opposite the Fresh Market along Whiskey Road. Participants are encouraged to stay for the entire time or as long as they can. If you cannot stand, chairs are welcome. Witnesses against war and all forms of violence meet on the first and third Monday of the month and take place rain or shine and on public holidays. Everyone, including children and men, is welcome. Participants can bring their own signs as long as they are non-partisan. Masks and social distancing are encouraged until COVID is behind us. For more information, call Lynn at 501-499-4485 or Brenda at 803-648-6020.

TUESDAY

the Awesome group Aiken Al-Anon meets 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays at First Christian Church, 900 Kerr Drive.

Nar-Anon Aiken family group for comfort meet from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesdays in person in the Boardroom near the Main Shrine of St. John’s United Methodist Church, 104 Newberry St. SW and via Zoom. For more information, send an email to momofoscar4@gmail.com.

Celebrate recovery, a 12-step group for men and women, meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Cedar Creek Church, 3001 Banks Mill Road.

WEDNESDAY

the The Aiken Section of the Association of Military Officers will meet at noon on Wednesday January 5 at Newberry Hall, 117 Newberry St. SW Chelsea Stutz, Park Manager at Redcliffe Plantation, will be the guest speaker.

JAN. 6

4 cats in the kennel will play jazz from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursdays at Willcox, 100 Colleton Ave.

JAN. 8

The House of Provision and the Oakwood / Randall Branch Baptist Church will be holding a new years party dinner starting at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 8 at Gyles Park, 406 Park Ave. SE Free hot meals to take out will be provided.

the Back to basics Alcoholics Anonymous Group meets in person at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 961 Trail Ridge Road. Masks are compulsory for everyone.

JAN. 11

the Aiken Newcomers Club will meet Tuesday at Newberry Hall, 117 Newberry St. Doors open at 9:30 am followed by meeting at 10:15 am. The program will be a presentation on Joye in Aiken. Donations for Joye in Aiken will be accepted. One must reserve. The cost is $ 20 per person and is payable at the door. To make or cancel a reservation, call Karen Carmen at 757-593-9013 or email newcomers29803@gmail.com. Reservations or cancellations must be made by noon on Thursday January 6.

JAN. 13

the Aiken County Disability Council to Meet at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 13 at 1016 chemin Vaucluse. For more information, call 803-642-8800.

JAN. 14

A inauguration ceremony to celebrate the library renovation project will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday January 14 at the Aiken County Public Library, 314 Chesterfield St. SW. For more information, visit abbe-lib.org.

JAN. 15

The Aiken Civic Orchestra and members of the Aiken Composers’ Guild will perform a New year concert, new voices at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 15 at the Etherredge Center on the USC Aiken campus, 471 University Parkway. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit aikencivicorchestra.org.

JAN. 18

Aiken beekeepers will offer a initiation to beekeeping The course will start on Tuesday January 18th. The class will run from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. over six Tuesdays at Trinity United Methodist Church, 2724 Whiskey Road, starting January 18. The cost is $ 70 per person and children under 17 are free with an adult. Places are limited and pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, call 912-660-7423.

JAN. 19

A American Red Cross Blood Drive will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, January 19 at American Legion Post No. 26, 636 Old Airport Road. For more information, visit redcrossblood.org.

JAN. 22

A Lollapalooza Kids’ Day Library will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 22 at the Aiken County Public Library, 314 Chesterfield St. SW. The event will feature entertainment and presenters throughout the day. For more information, visit abbe-lib.org.

JAN. 23

USC Aiken and Aiken Technical College will host the 2022 Community Celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at 3 p.m. on Sunday January 23 at the USCA Convocation Center, 2049 Champions Way, Graniteville. The United States House Majority Whip, James E. Clyburn, will be the keynote speaker. Doors open at 2:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit usca.edu.

JAN. 25

A adult book club will meet from 2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. on Tuesday, January 25 in the boardroom of the Aiken County Public Library, 314 Chesterfield St. SW, and online via Zoom. The selection of books for December is “Heartberries” by Terese Marie Mailhot. Registration is done at the information desk. Masks are mandatory for those present in person. For more information, visit abbe-lib.org.

JAN. 27

Jaimee Paul and Leif Shiers to perform “Broadway Our Way” at 7:30 p.m. on Monday January 27 and Tuesday January 28 at the Amentum Center for the Performing Arts, 126 Newberry St. SW The concert is part of the Aiken Performing Arts season 2021-2022. Tickets cost $ 45. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit aikenarts.com or call 803-648-1438.

JAN. 28

The Family and Marriage Coalition will hold a Marriage is worth celebrating the gala at 6 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 28 at the Woodside Country Club, 1000 Woodside Plantation Drive. Cherell Butler, Owner and Director of Complete Care Counseling, will be the guest speaker. The event will include a meal, fellowship and a message celebrating marriage and family. Tickets cost $ 70 per couple or $ 35 per person. For more information or to purchase tickets, call Roger Rollins at 803-640-4689 or email rogerrollins@gmail.com.


Source link

]]>
Del Sol Quartet opens the Jean C. Wilson concert series | News https://kcacm.org/del-sol-quartet-opens-the-jean-c-wilson-concert-series-news/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/del-sol-quartet-opens-the-jean-c-wilson-concert-series-news/ NEWBURYPORT – The Del Sol Quartet performs the first of four concerts in the Jean C. Wilson musical series on January 9 at 4 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 26 Pleasant St. The quartet will perform a unique work, “A Dust in Time” by Huang Ruo. “This is one of the most powerful pieces […]]]>

NEWBURYPORT – The Del Sol Quartet performs the first of four concerts in the Jean C. Wilson musical series on January 9 at 4 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 26 Pleasant St.

The quartet will perform a unique work, “A Dust in Time” by Huang Ruo.

“This is one of the most powerful pieces I have ever performed,” said Del Sol Quartet cellist Kathryn Bates. “It was written in the summer of 2020 as a way to express a sense of loss, a feeling of before and after, of heartbreak and hope.”

The series continues with organist Nicole Keller on January 16, the Danny Harrington Quartet with special guest Jeff Stout on January 23 and Carduus on February 13. Due to the pandemic, all four concerts will be broadcast live from the church sanctuary.

“You can see it exactly the same time it performs,” said John Mercer, a member of the musical series, “or for a limited time after the concert. The concerts will not be pre-recorded and edited, so it will be as close as possible to the excitement and immediacy of a live concert.

Masks and vaccination are compulsory, regardless of age. Anyone present must provide proof of two doses of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

The series has been named after one of its founders and director for many years. Now under the auspices of the First Religious Society, Unitarian Universalist Church, the series offers three or four concerts each winter.

Suggested donations are $ 20 ($ 10 for seniors); children and students can attend for free. For more information on concerts, to become a sponsor or to purchase tickets, visit https://www.frsuu.org/jean-c-wilson-music-series/.


Source link

]]>
Italian town hopes basketball patron will achieve national status https://kcacm.org/italian-town-hopes-basketball-patron-will-achieve-national-status/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 13:07:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/italian-town-hopes-basketball-patron-will-achieve-national-status/ PORRETTA TERME, Italy – In the chapel of a small hillside sanctuary in Porretta Terme – a beautiful town in central Italy known for the healing powers of its thermal waters – a single basketball-shaped window, its windows, curved like seams, shed light on the walls filled with basketball jerseys. On one table, a notebook […]]]>

PORRETTA TERME, Italy – In the chapel of a small hillside sanctuary in Porretta Terme – a beautiful town in central Italy known for the healing powers of its thermal waters – a single basketball-shaped window, its windows, curved like seams, shed light on the walls filled with basketball jerseys.

On one table, a notebook contained pages of devotions, including gratitude for a healed meniscus and prayers to “win the championship in the next few years.” The back wall bore a bas-relief of a dying basketball player, holding a ball in his left hand as the Virgin Mary watched her earth clock go by.

“I offer you the joy of every bucket,” prayed Don Filippo Maestrello, a local center-sized priest, to the Virgin of the Bridge in the basketball players’ chapel.

The founder of the local basketball association and the city’s tourism and sports manager bowed their heads to his side as he continued, imploring the Madonna to “guide our shot in the right direction” and “bless and protect my team”.

The people of Porretta have worshiped the Virgin of the Bridge for centuries, named after a 16th-century drawing of the Virgin Mary on a rock near a bridge over the nearby Reno River. Over the years, the rock became a site of devotion, ultimately inspiring the construction of the shrine where Don Maestrello prayed.

Locals have credited the Virgin of the Bridge with miracles, including saving a 17th-century pilgrim on the bridge by stopping bullets fired by a Florentine assassin.

But more recently, they say she brought her talents and divine interventions to the basketball court. After a decades-long campaign by local basketball fanatics, the Italian Bishops’ Conference in May gave its approval for her to be officially recognized as the patron saint of Italian basketball.

“A formality,” he said, as he walked recently to the town’s main square, lined with butchers, tortellini restaurants, a medieval tower and shops selling fabric, slippers. and hiking boots. The long square, he said, had also served as a makeshift outdoor court for a popular regional basketball tournament.

“We were famous for the injuries,” Bernardi said, pointing to the irregularities in the street.

Mr. Bernardi traces Porretta’s passion for basketball, vaguely, to Italian prisoners of war who learned the game from their American captors. By the early 1950s, Porretta had become the national center for women’s basketball in a hoop-obsessed part of Italy. In 1956, a religious ceremony consecrated the chapel of basketball players and a long procession of players carried torches and votive candles to the sanctuary.

Since then, the town has become a capital of youth basketball with tournaments in honor of the consecration of the chapel. Local and regional players began making pilgrimages to Our Lady for match day assistance, leaving shirt offerings just as their ancestors left medals.

Nicolò Savigni, city councilor for sport and tourism, said the Virtus team from Bologna came to pray before a big game – and won. In 2020 Meo Sacchetti, the coach of the Italian national basketball team, came to the chapel and paid tribute to the Madonna. The team qualified for the Olympics that year, the first time in 17 years.

“She surely despised the national team,” Sacchetti said.

“If it’s not a miracle,” says Bernardi.

Mr Bernardi and other advocates, who have been pushing for signatures and testimonials in support of Madonna’s candidacy as the National Hoops Patron, have powerful fans in their corner.

Cardinal Matteo Maria Zuppi, Archbishop of Bologna, has been called “Cardinal Basketball” by the local newspaper. In 2016, in the middle of a big local basketball tournament, he celebrated an Easter mass in honor of Our Lady and traveled to Porretta to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the basketball chapel.

“Life is like a basketball game,” he said at the time.

Francis himself used basketball pictures. In 2017, he referred to a “basketball player who plants his pivot foot on the ground and makes movements to protect the ball or finds room to pass or make a movement towards the hoop”. The Pope continued: “For us, this nailed to the ground around which we turn is the cross of Christ.

For Porretta, it is also an anchor for economic development.

The current city administration recently struck a deal with a company in Bologna to update its spa network, which could attract more older people looking to soothe their sore bones. But official recognition of Our Lady could attract more young pilgrims, Enrico Della Torre, 33, a local economic development official, said as he walked down the main street one recent morning.

Encouraging young visitors “is the most important thing for the rebirth of these cities,” he said.

For a town of 4000 inhabitants, Porretta already has a lot to do. For more than 30 years, soul music fans have made a pilgrimage to the Porretta Soul Festival, where the stone walls are brightened up with murals by Sam Cooke, Otis Redding, Booker T. and the MGs. and other stars.

While walking around town, Mr Bernardi – who also hosts a progressive rock festival in Porretta – came across Graziano Uliani, 72, the gregarious founder of the soul festival and a basketball fan as well. Mr. Uliani spoke about famous basketball players he met while following musicians in Memphis and Los Angeles. He also plugged in his festival until Mr Bernardi, noting the time, said he was heading to the shrine to meet the priest, Don Maestrello.

In his car, wearing a vintage jersey in the backseat, he drove past the dilapidated thermal baths where, he says, many locals worked in their youth. He crossed the bridge over the Reno River to the domed shrine and waited outside for the priest and Mr. Savigni, the town councilor.

It was cold and calm, except for the sound of the rushing water in the river. A local man drove by and told Mr Bernardi that Our Lady saved his life a second time after a second heart attack.

After the prayers of Don Maestrello in the shrine, Mr. Savigni said “we are planning to build a large arena in honor of the patron”.

Later that day, the three men went to a local gymnasium where the organizer of a basketball school had prayed to Madonna to intercede so the sport could survive the coronavirus blockades. The children attended classes with Francesco Della Torre, former Italian league player and brother of Enrico Della Torre, responsible for economic development. (“To beat him I would have needed days in the chapel,” Enrico Della Torre said.)

A ball bounces towards Don Maestrello. He took a corner kick. It was an aerial balloon.

“When I step on the field, everyone is terrified,” said the great prelate. “And then the first pass occurs. “

Don Maestrello was more at home in the large downtown parish church, where he displayed basketball trophies kept in a storage room for a possible patron saint museum. Mr. Bernardi opened a gray suitcase of basketball jerseys, some signed by entire NBA teams. Reverently, he pulled out a Kobe Bryant Lakers jersey, apparently signed by the superstar, who partly grew up nearby and spoke Italian.

When Mr. Bryant died in a helicopter crash in 2020, Mr. Bernardi said, “We all prayed at the shrine. For us he was an idol. He whispered Mr. Bryant’s nickname under his breath. “Black Mamba.”

He kept removing jerseys signed by players from NBA teams, sent as an offering, through a well-connected associate, to Madonna, and spoke of Porretta’s potential for Madonna to become global.

“We are not satisfied with the national discussion,” Bernardi said. “Either show us another Patron Saint, or it’s this one. We are ambitious.

Mr. Savigni, the head of tourism, caught the spirit. He walked through his dream squad of potential NBA loyalists a la Madonna and stopped dead in the lobby.

“Is Michael Jordan Catholic? ” He asked.


Source link

]]>
FCC senior pastor says happy to be back home https://kcacm.org/fcc-senior-pastor-says-happy-to-be-back-home/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 20:27:27 +0000 https://kcacm.org/fcc-senior-pastor-says-happy-to-be-back-home/ Becoming the Senior Minister of First Christian Church was a kind of homecoming for Reverend Beth Thomason, as well as the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. “When I was in high school I said I was going to be a pastor,” Thomason said. “I had a wonderful youth minister the whole time I was in […]]]>

Becoming the Senior Minister of First Christian Church was a kind of homecoming for Reverend Beth Thomason, as well as the fulfillment of a lifelong dream.

“When I was in high school I said I was going to be a pastor,” Thomason said. “I had a wonderful youth minister the whole time I was in the youth group and felt like that was the call I had.”

Thomason grew up in Homewood and graduated from Homewood High School in 1984. She attended the University of Montevallo and earned a degree in theater. Her first career was as a teacher at Parker High School where she taught public speaking and theater for five years.

The summer between high school and college, Thomason worked at Hargis Christian Retreat and met her future husband, Tim. They got married while she was in Montevallo. Tim had grown up attending First Christian Church and Beth had previously served as a volunteer youth minister there. They worked together at Hargis Christian Retreat and later got married.

“I was a member of this church and my husband is a life member of this church,” Thomason said. “When we got married, I transferred my members to this congregation. I was a teacher and I was the youth godfather at the time.

While in her role as volunteer youth minister, Thomason casually mentioned to the associate minister that if she had no other job, she could be in church working with youth all the time.

“He turned around and handed me a catalog of the seminar,” she said. “Within a year, I had resigned my teaching position and the congregation assigned me to attend seminary.

She quit her teaching job and began to explore her call to ministry, attending Lexington Theological Seminary, where she received her MA in Divinity and was ordained to the FCC in 1999.

For the next 20 years, Thomason served in churches in the Huntsville and Madison areas. In 2020, the family returned to Birmingham after she became the new FCC Chief Minister.

“FCC ordained me to ministry, but I immediately went to serve at FCC Huntsville and served there for 12 years as minister of youth,” she said. “I then served for nine years as a solo pastor at Madison Christian Church before coming home.”

“I feel like teaching really prepared me for the ministry. I love teens and spent my first 12 years of youth ministry, ”she said. “Teaching was really part of this ministry journey. Not as a side trip, but an integral part of their trip.

FCC has ministered to the Birmingham community for over 147 years and now has two women ministers: Thomason and Associate Minister Reverend Robin Blakemore. Thomason said being called back to the ministry at FCC was a homecoming for her and her family.

“It is not something that many ministers have the opportunity to experience,” she said. “It is the church that nurtured and helped shape my faith, so it is a sacred privilege to be able to lead them in ministry.”

When Thomas started as senior minister on May 1, 2020, she was unable to present her sermons to the congregation in person due to the pandemic lockdown.

“I couldn’t really meet my congregation face to face,” she said. “It was the hardest thing that ever happened to me in the ministry, to start a ministry in a church where it was almost a year before I met people. “

The church had to adapt to the circumstances and raised funds for equipment so they could broadcast live services. In the beginning, the services were filmed on iPhones and compiled into a computer program. Then the shrine was revamped to include monitors and technology to live streaming services.

Thomason said they did not record the service in the shrine because it looked so empty and large, but instead filmed in the church library, filmed communion at the table in the garden of prayer and during prayer time they would create voiceovers and show visual effects.

“We wanted to be able to broadcast live until we could come back and do live services in the shrine,” Thomas said. “We started broadcasting live from the shrine at Christmas, so it’s been over a year, and we continue to do so now.”

As a theater and public speaking graduate, Thomason said she used to speak to an audience or a congregation of people, so she had to change the way she presented her sermons.

Looking for a silver lining to the pandemic, Thomason said: “If you can call it a gift that came from not being able to be together, people started to understand that we had to move forward so that we can be together. The church is still the church if we can be physically inside the building.

FCC had its first in-person service on Easter Sunday 2021. It’s the church’s highest holy day and it was even more emotional for everyone to come together.

The Thomasons found a home in Irondale which they renovated and hoped to move in during the holidays. The couple have two daughters: Celia, who lives with her husband and daughter in Mineral Wells, Texas; and Sami, 20, who is part of the FAC audiovisual team.

In her spare time Thomason enjoys hiking and has said this is where she feels closest to God. She also enjoys the theater and looks forward to seeing performances in community theaters around Birmingham.


Source link

]]>
James Island congregation tries to find ‘messy message’ after church fire | News https://kcacm.org/james-island-congregation-tries-to-find-messy-message-after-church-fire-news/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/james-island-congregation-tries-to-find-messy-message-after-church-fire-news/ JAMES ISLAND – When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for Christmas worship, members will assemble in the church gymnasium, not the sanctuary. This is because a fire destroyed the main worship space of the church in September. But Fort Johnson parishioners understand that the Christmas spirit isn’t confined to a specific space. The joy and love […]]]>

JAMES ISLAND – When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for Christmas worship, members will assemble in the church gymnasium, not the sanctuary.

This is because a fire destroyed the main worship space of the church in September.

But Fort Johnson parishioners understand that the Christmas spirit isn’t confined to a specific space. The joy and love that accompanies the holiday season can be found wherever believers gather.

After all, this wasn’t the first time Fort Johnson Baptist has been devastated.

A spray-painted wooden sign was used to advertise worship services days after Hurricane Hugo in 1989 knocked down the church steeple. The sign, which had been stored above the church ceiling, reappeared after part of the air surface gave way in the September fire.

“It’s a good reminder that even after a disaster good things can happen,” said Pastor Marty Middleton, 43.






A spray painted sign, which was used to advertise worship services days after Hurricane Hugo, was revealed when the ceiling collapsed under the steeple in a fire at Fort Baptist Church Johnson in September. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




During the Christmas holiday season – one of the most important times of the year for the Christian community – Fort Johnson tries to preserve a sense of hope as the congregation continues to fight the destruction of its place of worship . At the same time, the faithful are reviewing what it really means to be a church, inspired by a wave of support from the community and from congregations that have faced similar challenges.

A message from the mess

A preschooler was the first to smell the smoke on September 9, telling his mother, “It smells like barbecue in here.” The boy’s mother, a teacher at the church’s preschool, called emergency services around 8:30 a.m. to report a fire at the church, located at 1473 Camp Road.

Firefighters from the James Island Public Service District Fire Department and other agencies in the area were able to put out the blaze within an hour. Authorities determined that a lightning strike struck the steeple and started the fire. The steeple fell during the fire, taking with it about half of the roof.

The steeple of James Island Church, the sanctuary damaged by the morning fire

The damage caused by the fire is mainly concentrated in the sanctuary. The church’s educational building, which houses the nursery school, was not affected by the fire itself, although it suffered water damage from fire hoses.

Helen Needham grew up in Fort Johnson. His family was a founding member of the congregation, established by James Island Baptist in 1960.

The Fort Johnson Sanctuary holds precious memories for their families. Needham, his sisters and daughter all celebrated their weddings in the church sanctuary. The children of Needham were baptized there. She held back tears as she remembered the day the building was engulfed in flames.

“When I saw that the church steeple was gone, I cried,” she said.






SECONDARY POSSIBILITY church fire from the balcony.jpg

Pastor Marty Middleton reflects on the destruction by fire on the balcony of Fort Johnson Baptist Church on Monday, December 13, 2021 in Charleston. The church now uses its gymnasium as a space for worship after the September fire. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




Standing in the pulpit of the shrine earlier this month, Middleton inspected the rubble. Broken glass, charred wood and other debris were strewn on the floor and on the benches. The sanctuary’s ceiling collapsed, leaving a gaping hole that reveals a blue sky. Mold has invaded many walls. The ground was soaked in rainwater.

The destruction is a visual reminder of the mess that exists in the world, Middleton said. The concept rings especially true this year as we all continue to navigate, with uncertainty, the pandemic.

“Sometimes when you come to church your life is a mess,” Middleton said. “But God is restoring this mess – taking this mess and sending a message.”

The church has adapted, moving its preschool to a separate campus building and its worship services to the church gymnasium, normally used for local recreational basketball games. The pastor predicts that reconstruction will begin in a few weeks, after the church’s insurance company determines whether it will be possible to renovate the existing shrine, or whether the church needs to demolish it and build a new one.

Middleton said her task was to help her congregation stay focused on the church’s mission and stay positive. His most recent series of sermons, “Hopeful Expectation,” tells the faithful to expect kindness at the end of this tragedy. This relates to the holiday season, when the themes of hope and peace are predominant.






Church Police Line.jpg

Pastor Marty Middleton reflects on the burning destruction of Fort Johnson Baptist Church on Monday, December 13, 2021 in Charleston. The church now uses its gymnasium as a space for worship after the September fire. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




Members of Fort Johnson were eagerly awaiting positive, yet simple, changes that might emerge from the fire, like a fresh carpet, new benches, and perhaps a new sanctuary.

Worship services, although in a non-traditional setting, have been a source of inspiration. The turnout has been constant and a sense of hope permeates the room, Middleton said.

“God’s promises are true,” Middleton said. “So when he says he comes to bring peace and comfort, he will when we trust him.”

The tragedy also taught Fort Johnson parishioners to focus more on relationships.






Inside the church fire.jpg

Pastor Marty Middleton reflects on the burning destruction of Fort Johnson Baptist Church on Monday, December 13, 2021 in Charleston. The church now uses its gymnasium as a space for worship after the September fire. Grace Beahm Alford / Staff




Since the fire, church members have gathered on certain Wednesday evenings to pray specifically for the restoration process. New relationships are also being formed. The congregation has grown with the addition of five families who have joined the church in the past three months.

For the most part, Fort Johnson has sought to maintain a steady rhythm of Christmas programs and missionary activities.

The church’s preschool moved its annual Christmas pageant to the front lawn. Small children, dressed to represent angels and wise men, told the Bible story of Christmas and sang holiday songs. The church continued its involvement in Operation Christmas Child, an initiative where churches buy Christmas gifts for children around the world. The congregation also purchased gifts for a few local families who are caring for foster children.

“We didn’t let the fire stop us,” Needham said.

Continue to serve

Fort Johnson has also seen a wave of community support.

A church donated public address equipment to the church for use during Sunday service. Another congregation donated toys and tables at Fort Johnson to use for kindergarten to replace items damaged by smoke. Local businesses donated food to worshipers who set up chairs and supplies over the weekend for Sunday worship.

Several other faith communities have sent financial donations, including St. Andrew’s in Mount Pleasant, which donated $ 10,000 to Fort Johnson to show support.

St. Andrew’s can understand the difficulties faced by the James Island group. Mount Pleasant Church lost all of its ministry center in a massive fire in 2018, leaving the congregation of about 2,000 without a place of worship and its day school without a meeting place.

Mount Pleasant's iconic St. Andrew's Church heavily damaged by fire

Bishop Steve Wood recalled that the days after the fire were mostly about addressing these immediate concerns. But Wood said he also tried to keep St. Andrew’s focused on its mission of service.

In doing so, he wrote a letter after the fire that eventually became a form of regular communication, keeping members encouraged and informed of the rebuilding schedule.

“I just told them everything would be fine,” he said.

After many hardships along the way, St. Andrew's will host the first services at a new worship center

The church then engaged in ministry outside the building. St. Andrew’s “adopted” a fire station in Mount Pleasant and served baked goods to firefighters. The lawyers and architects of the congregation offered their skills to help the church in its process of renovation. Members held prayer walks throughout the Mount Pleasant neighborhood where the church is located. The parishioners bought roses for some neighbors. Worshipers began to build relationships with teachers at Mount Pleasant Academy, where the church began hosting Sunday services.

Wood’s advice at Fort Johnson is, despite the tragedy, to seek opportunities to serve others.

“The hardest thing is that a fire, and those kinds of circumstances, can be so all-consuming that you’re missing out on what God is doing right now,” Wood said. “Focus on the mission. Keep the essentials essential. Pay attention to what God is doing around you. It mobilizes the people around you.


Source link

]]>
Donald l fisher https://kcacm.org/donald-l-fisher/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 01:35:54 +0000 https://kcacm.org/donald-l-fisher/ Donald L Fisher, died on December 17, 2021, at his home in Garden City, at the age of 92 years, 5 months and 16 days. He was born in Dodge City, KS, on July 1, 1929, the eldest child of Roy H and Myrtle Pennington Fisher. Don’s childhood and elementary school days were spent on […]]]>

Donald L Fisher, died on December 17, 2021, at his home in Garden City, at the age of 92 years, 5 months and 16 days. He was born in Dodge City, KS, on July 1, 1929, the eldest child of Roy H and Myrtle Pennington Fisher.

Don’s childhood and elementary school days were spent on a farm in Mertilla Township, northwest Meade County. He attended and graduated from Meade High School in 1947 and was recognized as a local mile medalist and state winner and center of the undefeated 1946 football team. Being a cowboy was pretty much everything Don Fisher knew. He had an innate love for animals of all kinds. His first loves were horses, then Hereford pigs registered for a few years, then cattle and a good cow dog. As a teenager, Don raised a filly named Dixie Lou, and she became the foundation of 7-year-old Fisher Quarter Horses, with her lines still present in her broodmares until their dispersal some eight decades later.

He started his calf-roping rodeo days as a teenager in the early 1940s and was seen at rodeos in western Kansas and northern Oklahoma for many years. A special sweetheart was also seen accompanying her for the “ribbon roping” event. He and Warrenetta Marrs were married on June 4, 1947 at Meade United Methodist Church and celebrated their 74th wedding anniversary in 2021. They raised their family of four sons in Meade, while Don was busy as a ranch man. , breed and develop quality ranch horses and work for several large beef farms over the years in western Kansas.

Don is survived by his wife, Warrenetta, Garden City, sons Steven and Karla, Manhattan, KS; Stan and Cristyal, Derby, KS; Randy and Rhonda, Garden City, KS; and Bryan and Melonie, Duncan, OK. There are also 13 grandchildren, 27 great-grandchildren; sister Carole Burner, CA; brothers and sister-in-law Jack Berghaus, Meade; Alfred Marrs, Meade; Virgil Marrs, Hays; Betty and Clarence Leis, AR. He was predeceased by his parents, his sister Velva Berghaus and his brothers Jimmie and Henry (Gene) Fisher.

Don was mentored cowboy style during his high school years by Western Meade-area ranchers like Quimby Demmitt, AW Batman, and Uncles Earl and Elmer Fisher and Roscoe Nash. A small rope arena built under the barn of the family home at the southwest corner of Meade was designed for easy practice, not only for Don, but also for Brother Jimmie Fisher and other cousins ​​and friends of Fisher. His four sons were also there to push the calves, pull the chute rope, and start learning cowboy manners from their father. Eventually, the calf lasso would give way to the team lasso craze, where Don was equally comfortable and skillful at either end of the ox. These hours of practice prepared Don for the days when farming 2,000 to 4,000 head of cattle on pastures and stalks of wheat would mean lassoing every day to tend sick cattle.

As a self-taught breeder, Don seemed to have a natural instinct for knowing what animals needed. For several years he spent most Tuesdays at the Meade Livestock Sale Barn, and if he didn’t buy cattle, spray cattle, or process cattle, he was there to help around the pens. In 1972, the lure of bountiful wheat pastures and flat plains that allowed for an easy-to-build electric fence saw Don, Warrenetta, and Bryan move to Richfield, KS, where Don tended thousands of cattle for over 20 years. During this time, he also fulfilled a childhood dream of summering feeder cattle on ranches in northeastern New Mexico. By the late 1980s, they were living in the countryside of Menlo and have resided in Garden City since 1990.

As the days grew shorter, the years passed faster, and the livestock market hit its lowest point, Don traded an electric fence for feedlot steel, and he put in practices his keen skills pulling sick cattle from pens and running the vet’s hut at several feedlots in western Kansas. Feedlot managers and consulting vets were known to brag about the reduction in illness and death while Don was in their facility.

A partial retirement brought Don and Warrenetta back to settle in Garden City in 1990. He continued to work in the stable where he stood his well-known gray stallions, rode pens at a nearby feedlot, or helped out. a family farm for livestock and hay. until a major health problem slows it down. His last feedlot cowboy paycheck came at age 86.

During his teenage years, Don was confirmed as a member of the United Methodist Church in Meade, with continued memberships in Methodist churches in Richfield and Garden City. He has long been a 4-H leader in Meade and Morton counties and has served on local county extension councils. Don was instrumental in the development of the Garden City chapter of the Fellowship of Christian Cowboys after serving as president. He was an active supporter of the Journey to the Cross Rodeo Bible Camp in Garden City. He was a life member of the American Quarter Horse Association and a life member of the Gold Card of the United States Team Roping Association and the International Feedlot Cowboy Association, where he competed in the national finals in Amarillo, Texas and Garden City. . Don was honored for his hard-working cowboy days and Western way of life as a participant in the Team Pro / Celebrity Roping match which took place for many years at the Beef Empire Days Rodeo and Dodge City Round-up Rodeo. In 2005, Don was inducted into the Boot Hill Cowboy Hall of Fame as the Kansas “Working Cowboy”.

A celebration of Don’s life will be held at Meade First United Methodist Church on Monday, December 27, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. Riders on horseback are invited to assemble at Meade Municipal Park before noon, to help make the final ride to the cemetery for internment. Interment will be in Graceland Cemetery, Meade.

Visitations will be from 2:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 26, 2021 at Price & Sons Funeral Home, 620 N. Main Street, Garden City, Kansas. Visiting with family will begin at 10:00 a.m. Monday Meade First United Methodist Church in Meade, Kansas in the pre-service church sanctuary.

Funeral services will be webcast live on www.priceandsons.com

Price and Sons Funeral Home, Garden City, will make arrangements. Requests can be sent by email: [email protected]; online at https://priceandsons.com; or by calling 620-276-2364. Memorials can be made at JTTC Rodeo Bible Camp, PO Box 1926, Garden City, KS, 67846, or left in the care of Price & Sons Funeral Home.


Source link

]]>
Howard Happenings | News, Sports, Jobs https://kcacm.org/howard-happenings-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 07:31:55 +0000 https://kcacm.org/howard-happenings-news-sports-jobs/ FATHER CHRISTMAS MILLHEIM Santa will be visiting Millheim and the surrounding area of ​​the Millheim Fire Company coverage area tomorrow morning. Santa will leave Station 18 in a fire engine at 8 a.m. and distribute treats to children on the streets of Millheim, Aaronsburg, Coburn and Woodward. Hear the siren announcing the arrival of Santa […]]]>

FATHER CHRISTMAS

MILLHEIM

Santa will be visiting Millheim and the surrounding area of ​​the Millheim Fire Company coverage area tomorrow morning. Santa will leave Station 18 in a fire engine at 8 a.m. and distribute treats to children on the streets of Millheim, Aaronsburg, Coburn and Woodward. Hear the siren announcing the arrival of Santa Claus and take your children to the sidewalk to see Santa Claus.

The Millheim Fire Company is also hosting a Breakfast with Santa on Sunday, December 19 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $ 4 for ages 5 to 12 and $ 6 for ages 13 and over. Children aged 4 and under can have breakfast with Santa for free. Milk and orange juice will also be served with the meal.

For more information on Santa’s traditional visit to Millheim this weekend, call 814-424-0268.

CHRISTMAS AWAKENING SERVICE

Howard United Methodist Church will be hosting a Christmas Eve worship service on Friday, December 24, starting at 7 p.m. in the church sanctuary. The public is invited to attend the service and enjoy a birthday cake in honor of Jesus and ice cream afterwards.

NEW

CALENDARS

The Howard Borough Parks and Recreation Committee will be selling its 2022 calendars outside the Post Office from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturdays in December. Proceeds from calendar sales will keep city parks in good shape, so be sure to purchase yours soon. They also make great Christmas gifts!

NEW LIONS

The Howard Area Lions Food Bank will be open Dec. 20 for distribution to Clinton County residents living in the Beech Creek and Township borough as well as to Center County residents who missed their food distribution earlier this. this month. Distribution is from noon to 3 p.m. at the old Beech Creek Elementary School. Make sure to bring back your sturdy boxes every month so they can be refilled.

Those using the Howard Area Lions Food Bank who are eligible to receive the toddler toys this year should make sure to go to the December 20 distribution to register and complete the necessary information. to collect the toys. The toys will be distributed on December 20 during food bank hours from noon to 3 p.m.

Lions Bingo will be held at the Beech Creek Fire Company Social Hall on December 23. The doors and kitchen open at 5 p.m. and the bingo games start at 6:30 p.m.

At the last bingo everyone sang “Happy Birthday” to Linda Kessinger, Barb Teaman and Peggy Gilbert who are celebrating their birthdays this month. Thank you, Linda, for sharing your birthday cake with everyone at bingo.

At the start of the bingo, a trivia question was asked by Lion Paul Confer which went like this… Santa Claus makes all his elves go to school at the North Pole because having a good education is very important. What did each of Santa’s elves have to learn in school?

Donna Greendoner won a $ 5 bill, her response being the “Elfabet”.

COUNTRY JAM

The Country Jam at the Howard Fire Station will not take place this month as the Fourth Sunday is so close to Christmas and the band members will be busy with their post-Christmas activities.

The members of the Back Porch String Band wish everyone a safe Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

LIVE NATIVITY

Members of the United Methodist Church in the Bald Eagle Valley Community will participate in their annual living nativity scene titled “The Reason for the Season”, with the public invited to attend this Christmas celebration.

The living nativity scene will take place tonight, December 17th; Saturday December 18; and Sunday, December 19, and features pre-recorded music, live actors and real animals. Each evening there will be two nightly shows with the first starting at 6:30 p.m. followed by a show at 7:30 p.m.

The nursery is held outdoors at Eagle Towing and Recovery located at 1049 S. Eagle Valley Road, near Wingate. Tiered seats are available. Dress warmly and bring a blanket for the temperatures outside.

Contact Debbie at 814-355-0075 for more information.

CORNOLE LEAGUE

Howard Fire Company has started a CornHole League and participants are invited to join and play weekly. The new league kicked off on December 14 at 7 p.m. and will be held every Tuesday evening until the end of March at the fire hall. Individual scores are kept for the weeks of your participation.

The cost is $ 10 per person each week and you can play individually or with a team of two.

Contact Don Moore on the Howard Fire Company Facebook page or just show up Tuesday night to sign up and start playing CornHole.

HAPPY

SCHEDULE

Make Howard happy and shiny this Christmas season by entering the second annual Christmas Decorating Contest. Howard residents and businesses are invited to get creative with lights, 12 foot inflatables, or whatever you can make or find in your attic to decorate.

To enter your home or business in the contest, you must have already submitted your name and address to howardparksandrec@gmail.com. Your home will not be eligible for the contest if you have not registered using this email by the December 11 registration deadline.

Here is a list of houses that have successfully entered the contest:

152 Main Street East; 195 Main Street East; 196 E. Main Street; 123 Heverly Street; 145 Black Street; 127 Howard Street; 306 Walnut Street; 224 Shirlyn Drive and 254 Shirlyn Drive.

These are the houses that all voters should plan to visit to see all the lights and decorations, and then you will vote for the house that you think is best decorated.

Voting is due in person on December 18. Everyone must assemble and show up at the municipal park kiosk (next to the post office) between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. tomorrow night to fill out and submit their ballot. Votes can only be submitted to the Belvedere event.

Treats and drinks will be served as you vote for your favorite Happy Howardays house. Anyone can participate in the vote and now is a great time to wish your friends and neighbors a vacation in Howard.

The gift card prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third votes in the contest.

Contact Anita at 814-571-4160 for more information. and stay tuned for me to announce the winners here too.

LAST CHANCE

Liberty Baptist Church in Blanchard has packages of Terry Lynn nuts that still have not been sold. The varieties of nuts range from almonds, cashews, peanuts and walnuts. The items are priced from $ 6 to $ 12 and will make great Christmas gifts. If you’re interested, call Joyce at 570-962-3355.

——

Howard Happenings is written and compiled by Tammy Coakley who can be contacted by email at tammysue0115@gmail.com or by phone at 814-625-2684.

The latest news of the day and more in your inbox


Source link

]]>
Palmerton news for December 15, 2021 – Times News Online https://kcacm.org/palmerton-news-for-december-15-2021-times-news-online/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 17:20:49 +0000 https://kcacm.org/palmerton-news-for-december-15-2021-times-news-online/ Church of Living Faith Faith Alive Church, 678 Pine St. Palmerton (Bowmanstown), has two services each Sunday with Pastor Rob Timlin. At 8:30 am, it is the contemporary service followed by the Sunday school for all ages at 9.45 am then by the traditional service at 11 am. Every Wednesday at 7 p.m., prayer and […]]]>

Church of Living Faith

Faith Alive Church, 678 Pine St. Palmerton (Bowmanstown), has two services each Sunday with Pastor Rob Timlin. At 8:30 am, it is the contemporary service followed by the Sunday school for all ages at 9.45 am then by the traditional service at 11 am.

Every Wednesday at 7 p.m., prayer and praise

Every Thursday at 7:30 p.m., it’s men’s Bible study

Events to come:

December 19 is the Children’s Sunday School Christmas program at 9.45am. The Children’s Christmas Party will be at 5.30pm and the Youth Group Christmas Party will be at 6.30pm.

On December 24, the traditional Christmas candlelight service will be held at 5 p.m. and the contemporary Christmas candlelight service will be held at 7 p.m.

For more information on Faith Alive, please visit our website or call the church office at 610-852-2805.

New Year’s Day dinner

A free New Years Community Dinner will be served at Faith Alive Church in Bowmanstown on January 1. Noon, 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. are the three seats for a pork and sauerkraut dinner. Places are limited for each dinner, so the public is invited to confirm their presence if they participate. Call the church office at 610-852-2805 to reserve a seat.

JUCC

The United Church of Christ in Jerusalem, 545 Church Drive, Trachsville, will hold the Sunday service at 10 a.m. in the sanctuary. You can also stay in your vehicle and listen to the service on 95.5 FM radio station or watch live on Facebook. The service is also posted on the website after it is concluded. Acting Pastor Don Quayle will lead the worship service.

The JUCC Quilt & Crafts Group will meet on December 23 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

On December 19 there will be a Christmas party for children and young people. The party will take place during the 10 o’clock service.

Two Christmas Eve services are planned this year, one at 5 p.m. in the church grove (weather permitting) and at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary.

Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jerusalem

The Evangelical Lutheran Jerusalem Church, 500 Church Drive, Trachsville, will be holding Christmas Eve services at 7 p.m. The service will take place indoors and outdoors according to your personal preference. Those who stay outside can listen on their car radio. For those who go indoors, face masks are preferred.

Sale of meat pie

The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Jerusalem, 500 Church Drive, Trachsville, is having a meat pie sale. There is a choice of chicken, pork or mixed chicken / pork. There is also beef available at a slightly higher cost. Orders are due before December 19th. To order, call 610-681-5200 or 610-681-5403.

Pick up at the church on January 17 or 18 at noon. When ordering, please specify the date on which you wish to collect your order.

Holy Lutheran Trinity

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 502 Lafayette Ave., Palmerton, will hold a Sunday church service at 10:15 a.m. If you plan to attend, call the church office at 610-826-2525. If you cannot attend in person, you can register on Zoom.

Bible study takes place on Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to noon in the adult education room.

The Christmas Eve service with communion will be at 7 p.m.

Personal care raffle

The Holiday Healing Self-Care Raffle has started at the Palmerton Area Library. Stop by to browse these wonderful items and purchase tickets. It includes a selection of items and gift cards to help you relax and rejuvenate while on vacation. The draw will take place on December 18. All profits will be donated to the library.

Christmas Eve at Penn’s Peak

Blue Mountain Community Church is hosting the Christmas Eve “Life with Jesus” candlelight service at Penn’s Peak on December 24 from 6 to 7:15 pm No fees or reservations required. Everyone is welcome.

Fund raising

Wendy Borger of Blue Bomber Notary, 210 Delaware Ave., Palmerton, is hosting a fundraiser for Bev (Bedrock Notary), daughter Lisa and grandson Robby on December 19 at the boutique. Wendy will be there December 19 from noon to 3 p.m. for donations and cards for them. Bev can use gas cards to travel to take Lisa to the cancer center. She loves Dunkin ‘and Robby loves McDonald’s. If you just want to drop a card that would be great. If you can’t make it that day, call 610-824-2583 to drop you off.

Pantry

This is a reminder that the CACPAC sponsored Palmerton Food Pantry will be held at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 2915 Fireline Road, Palmerton, on Fridays 8:30 am to 2:30 pm. Please note that this is a week earlier than usual due to holidays.

Coat training

Kids for the Community is hosting its second annual Warmth for Winter Coat campaign. You can drop off your slightly worn coats, gloves, scarves, hats on the porch at 630 Franklin Ave. Please no leather or wool.

Breakfast buffet

An all-you-can-eat breakfast buffet will be held Sunday from 8 a.m. to noon at the Bowmanstown Rod and Gun Club, 525 Club Road, Palmerton. Menu items include made-to-order eggs, potatoes, pancakes, SOS, toast, cereal, hash, ham, bacon, sausage, orange juice, coffee, tea and milk.

You will also have a special guest, Santa Claus! So bring the family, the camera, and your appetites. Breakfast is open to the public.

BWC

Bethany Wesleyan Church, 457 Delaware Ave., Palmerton, will have Sunday services at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

During the 10:30 am service there will be a Christmas party for ages 3 to 5. A Christmas story, prizes, snacks, games, and crafts are just a few of the things kids can do. There will also be a Christmas outfit contest. Come in your Christmas pajamas, ugly sweater or dressed like a Christmas tree, or in your favorite Christmas outfit. A prize for the best outfit will be awarded.

Ugly sweater evening

Bowmanstown Volunteer Fire Co., 259 Lime St, Bowmanstown will host an Ugly Sweater Christmas party open to the public on December 18, starting at 9 p.m.

Contact Lenora Robertson at 610-349-2436, lj123@ptd.net or 664 Delaware Ave., Palmerton, PA, 18071. Contact the Times News at 800-443-0377 or tneditor@tnonline.com.


Source link

]]>