Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 07:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 The Haunting of Beelzebub Road: South Windsor’s Scariest Street https://kcacm.org/the-haunting-of-beelzebub-road-south-windsors-scariest-street/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:28:02 +0000 https://kcacm.org/the-haunting-of-beelzebub-road-south-windsors-scariest-street/ SOUTH WINDSOR, CT – Journalism students at South Windsor High School have written several stories that will be included in the coming weeks on South Windsor Patch. Here’s an article about one of the city’s most interesting street names, written by sophomore Andrew Kronenwetter and senior Ava Shasha, submitted by their teacher, Cara Quinn. Beelzebub, […]]]>

SOUTH WINDSOR, CT – Journalism students at South Windsor High School have written several stories that will be included in the coming weeks on South Windsor Patch. Here’s an article about one of the city’s most interesting street names, written by sophomore Andrew Kronenwetter and senior Ava Shasha, submitted by their teacher, Cara Quinn.

Beelzebub, by definition, is 1: the devil, or 2: a fallen angel on the Milton’s Paradise Lost ranking.
next to Satan. Beelzebub claims to cause destruction by tyrants, cause demons to be
worshiped among men, to excite the priests to covetousness, to cause jealousies in the cities and murders, and to
bring war.

If you’re driving down the long bumpy road in Beelzebub, you might not think much about it, but there’s
scarier stories under the bumps of Beelzebub, and it starts decades back. With a road
originally named “Lovely Street”, unexpected events would change the road forever.

In the summer of 1922, on August 14, South Windsor resident Mina Bissell set off in search of
his cow. Mrs. Bissell will not be seen again until December 11, 1930. But when she was
found, only his skeletal remains remained. Before her skeleton and bones are found, she
clothing was found 11.2 miles from where his remains were found.

Bissell’s death was apparently caused by foul play, but who would murder an innocent woman?

Walter Green, son of Mina Bissell. There have been many stories and speculations about Green.
Most claim he was a “strange” and “strange” person. Green’s neighbors alleged he was a violent
man, others claimed he was crazy, while others thought he had Alzheimer’s disease. He also has
Rumor has it that Green was admitted to an insane asylum and escaped. The Prowl could not
to verify these accounts.

No one has ever been charged with Ms Bissell’s murder, but many people believe that Walter
Green, his son, was the most likely suspect.

Green and Bissell both lived in a house near Beelzebub’s field, which would later burn
broken down due to fire. If you go down Beelzebub, you can still see where the house once stood.

On September 23, 2003, members of the church in Avery Street woke up to hear that a fire had broken out in
the educational wing of the church, destroying and severely damaging the sanctuary. The fire had
made the church uninhabitable.

While the church is called “Avery Street”, the church address is located on Beelzebub Road. But the
the church is called Avery Street, because why would a church be named something related to the
devil?

Although these are stories in old newspapers, there have been claims from other countries in the South
Residents of Windsor, under an article written on the CTMQ website about Beelzebub. Many people
claimed to have seen an unknown man walking the streets of Beelzebub, some claimed
have a strange feeling on the street. But a common factor is that when it comes to cell
service, Beelzebub is known as a “dead zone”, if you look at your phone, regardless of the provider
you have, you will notice that you only have one bar along the way. Chance?

You will hear many different stories and theories on this route. Some people believe there is
there is no connection between the street name and the street events. Some people
pretend that none of the stories are true.

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Religious services https://kcacm.org/religious-services/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 10:54:27 +0000 https://kcacm.org/religious-services/ Note: Submit applications by email only to editor@delcotimes.com by Wednesday noon. Bethlehem Church: 4 Westtown Road, Thornton, PA 19373. www.BeBethlehem.com. All are welcome to Sunday services in person and online. 8:45 a.m. traditional and 10:45 a.m. contemporary with a children’s program. Join us at Facebook.com/BeBethlehemPA for services and “Journey Through the Psalms” Tuesday mornings at […]]]>

Note: Submit applications by email only to editor@delcotimes.com by Wednesday noon.

Bethlehem Church: 4 Westtown Road, Thornton, PA 19373. www.BeBethlehem.com. All are welcome to Sunday services in person and online. 8:45 a.m. traditional and 10:45 a.m. contemporary with a children’s program. Join us at Facebook.com/BeBethlehemPA for services and “Journey Through the Psalms” Tuesday mornings at 10am.

Beverly Hills United Presbyterian Church: 500 Midvale Ave., Upper Darby, meets in person and via Zoom Sunday at 11 a.m. For more information and Zoom login information, visit www.bhpcud.com.

Chambers Memorial Presbyterian Church: 2 Sylvan Avenue, Rutledge. Sunday morning service at 10 a.m. with the Rev Na.

Chi United Church: 5151 Chichester Avenue, Aston. Worship at 10 a.m. on Sunday. Mandatory mask and social distancing, or watch live on Facebook from home. Or if you prefer, listen in the parking lot to 94.9 FM in your car.

Chester Christian Church: 308 W Third St., Chester. Sunday morning service at 9:15 a.m., which will be broadcast live on our Facebook page and our YouTube channel. No in-person activities will take place.

Victor’s Church: 1016 Sunset St., Trainer. 610-485-6090 or churchoftheovercomer@gmail.com. The website is www.churchoftheovercomer.net and on Facebook: Church of the Overcomer (coto1016). Worship every Sunday at 10 a.m. Food bank open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Bring your own bags. Suitable for blue jeans. Spiritual Opportunities: Celebrate Recovery/Free Indeed, a Christ-centered 12-step recovery program for anyone struggling with injury, pain, or addiction of any kind. Prison To Praise Ministry, Youth Development, Boys To Men, Daughters Of Destiny, Academy Of Champion. Call with any questions or concerns.

Concord Liberty Presbyterian Church: 256 Bethel Road, Glen Mills. Worship is Sunday at 10 a.m. The service is streamed live on Facebook. Wearing a mask is optional. However, the additional seat spacing will continue. Kids on the Move (Sunday School) meets at 10 a.m. with a “Come to Superpower City” program for K-6 students. The crèche and pre-kindergarten will be offered to you on request from the greeters when you enter for the service. Prayer times on Sundays and weekdays as follows: Sunday at 9:15 a.m. at the library to pray for the morning service, Wednesday from 1 p.m. at the sanctuary and Wednesday evening from 7 p.m. in the Getz room. The reception of annual donations for Operation Christmas for Children has begun. There is a box in the narthex for depositing items and monetary gifts in the run up to the wrapping party for the proposed date of November 12. Individuals will also donate items and prepare shoe boxes for girls aged 5-9. For questions, contact the church office at office@concordliberty.org or call 610-358-2105.

Eddystone United Methodist Church: 733 Saville Ave., Eddystone, offers worship at 10 a.m. on Sundays. Pastor John Lafferty will bring his message in everyday language and offer support to all in these troubled times. The worship message and prayer concerns can be found anytime on the Eddystone Family & Friends Facebook page. For more information call 610-872-6094 or email EddystoneUMC@gmail.com

First African Baptist Church: 901 Clifton Ave., Sharon Hill, will celebrate the Lord’s Supper and the Right Hand of Communion during an in-person worship service and live stream on Sunday, November 13 at 9:45 a.m. In Light of the most recent reports and advice from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, masks are mandatory during in-person worship service. To watch the live stream, go to the First African Baptist Church of Darby Township via YouTube Live, or listen to the service with the conference call number at 617-691-8245. Chaplain Col. B. Greg Edison will deliver the morning message. Adult Sunday School will be held at 9 a.m. every Saturday until further notice on Zoom or by conference call. Conference call access numbers: 929-205-6099 or 301-715-8592. Training courses for new members have resumed.

Lansdowne First Presbyterian Church: 140 N. Lansdowne Ave, Lansdowne. Join us for in-person worship at 10 a.m. on Sunday. Mask and social distancing section available or watch live on Zoom from home. Find the Zoom link, more information and events at https://lansdownepresbyterianchurch.com/. Contact the church with any questions: 610-622-0800 or office@lansdownepresbyterianchurch.com.
First United Methodist Church: 350 W. State St., Media, will have an adult Sunday school at 9 a.m. Babysitting service is available.

The Foundry Church: 25 Cedar Road, Wallingford. Multiple ways to connect to worship, prayer, and arts programming. Sunday worship is at 10:30 a.m. It is available in person, streamed live on Facebook and on YouTube. Thursday evening prayer at 7 p.m. at the church and on Google Meet. Follow the artistic program on Facebook at Studio 410. For more details and requests: Info@thefoundrychurch.org or www.thefoundrychurch.org.

Gateway Community Church: 708 S. Old Middletown Road, Media, For information and registration, contact Mary Campbell at 610-566-0131 or mrosecampbell@yahoo.com

Glenolden Congregational Church: 115 S. Scott Ave., Glenolden, has Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. with William E. Bounds. Sunday school and prayer meeting on Tuesdays at 6 p.m. and Bible study on Thursdays at 6 p.m. Call the office for more information at 610-583-7723. Masks are mandatory. Come and be blessed.

House of God’s Glory Haven: 900 E. Ninth St., Chester. 610-876-7764. Sunday school at 9 a.m., morning worship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday evening prayer at 6 p.m. and Bible study at 6:30 p.m. All are welcome. Apostle Charmaine Hollis, pastor

Immanuel Lutheran Church: 501 Chester Pike, Norwood. As a Reconciling in Christ congregation, Immanuel Lutheran is committed to celebrating God’s love with all, for we are all created in the image of God. Regardless of your abilities, gender identity, sexual orientation, relationship status, race, culture, religious tradition or economic situation; whatever your past or present, you are welcome to share the love of God and our community. All are welcome to worship with the congregation on Sunday mornings at 11 a.m.

Linwood Heights United Methodist Church: 1627 Chichester Ave., invites all to worship Sundays at 10:45 a.m. either in person or live on Facebook. For more information about ministries or Sonrise Christian Day School, call 610-485-2300 or visit www.linwoodumchurch.com.

Marple Presbyterian’s: Traditional Sunday service begins at 10:30 a.m. in the sanctuary, or virtually on Twitch.tv. Children are welcome. A daycare service is provided for children 3 years and under. Marple also offers a Sunday school for preschool and elementary school children, and a Sunday evening youth group for middle and high school students. For more information on Sunday School, Bible Study, Missionary Evangelism, Community Involvement and Small Groups, visit: www.marplepres.org.

New Bethel Holiness Church: 717 Kerlin St., Chester, invites you to Sunday worship at 11 a.m. Sunday school starts at 9:30 a.m. Prayer and Bible study every Tuesday at 7 p.m.

The New Harvest Fellowship Ministries: 3001 West 10th St., Chester, worship beginning Sunday mornings at 10 a.m. Lunch will be served after the service and all CDC guidelines will be enforced. Elder Mark C. Birdsong, pastor.

New Life Community Church of God: 500 LaGrange Ave., Essington, 484-494-6726. We are a charismatic Pentecostal church. Our Sunday school is at 10:00 a.m. followed by worship at 11:00 a.m. We have a women’s group and a men’s group that meet for Bible study every second Monday evening. The church opens Monday and Wednesday at 6 p.m. for intercessory prayer. Separate groups meet at 6:30 p.m. We also have a Bible study on Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. We have new pastors, Reverend York Ash, 231-218-7805, and his wife, Reverend Shirley Ash, 727-631-5332. If you are looking for a church or need a change, join us on Sunday to hear the Word of God and fellowship with us.

Norwood United Methodist Church: 315 Chester Pike, Norwood. 610-532-0982. 10 a.m. Sunday worship with Pastor Brendan. For parents, there are two Sunday School classes for children during this time: Little Sprouts Bible Time for ages 5 and up and Bible Bunch Time for ages 6-12. Children meet in the church sanctuary with their parents/guardians and then are sent back to classes. Adult Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Live broadcast of the service on Facebook bit.ly/FacebookNUMC, then post on YouTube bit.ly/YouTubeNUMC. Use the Ridley Avenue entrance with the double glass doors, which is also handicapped accessible. Additional parking available adjacent to the Cavanagh Funeral Home parking lot if no burial is taking place. Visit www.NorwoodUMC.org for more information.

Prospect Hill Baptist Church and Loaves and Fishes Pantry: 703 Lincoln Ave., Prospect Park. Sunday worship, in person and online, 11 a.m. www.prospecthillbaptist.org. On Facebook: @prospecthillbc. The pantry serves Delaware County residents meat, dairy, produce, and canned goods. These hours are Tuesdays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. More info on Facebook at delcoloavesandfishes and www.delcoloavesandfishes.org; and 610-532-9000

Prospect United Methodist Church: Eighth and Lincoln Avenues, Prospect Park, worship in the sanctuary at 11 a.m. Sunday. Sunday lessons at 9:45 a.m. for children and adults. https://www.facebook.com/prospectumcevents. email: se.prospectpark.prospect@epaumc.org

St. James Episcopal Church: 732 11th Ave., Prospect Park. Sunday morning Eucharist in person at 9 a.m., or virtually live on the St. James Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/stjamesprospectpark.

St. John the Evangelist: 16 W. Third St., Essington. Sunday services at 7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday school is also at 11am. Website: www.stjohnsessington.com.

St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church: 50 E. Plumstead Ave., Lansdowne. Sunday worship at 10 a.m., plus other learning and mission opportunities. For more information and Zoom login information: stpaulslansdowne.org.

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church: 199 W. Baltimore Ave. Clifton Heights. 610-622-3636. Sunday worship at 9 a.m. or live stream on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ststephenscliftonheights. Sunday Bible Study at 10:30 a.m. Website: www.stsec.org.

Swarthmore Presbyterian Church: 727 Harvard Avenue, Swarthmore. Early morning service in the Loeffler Chapel from 8 a.m. on Sundays. Traditional worship begins at 10:15 a.m. in the sanctuary.

Trainer Trinity United Methodist Church, 3705 W. Ninth St., offers Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m. The morning message for November 20 is “Has anyone invited Jeremiah? » Email: trainerumc@comcast.net. Facebook: Trainer Trinity United Methodist Church. YouTube: trinity umc trainer

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These Contemporary Icons Show the Saints Among Us in a New Light – Baptist News Global https://kcacm.org/these-contemporary-icons-show-the-saints-among-us-in-a-new-light-baptist-news-global/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 10:37:34 +0000 https://kcacm.org/these-contemporary-icons-show-the-saints-among-us-in-a-new-light-baptist-news-global/ Martin Luther King Jr., Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Maya Angelou and Mister Rogers are crowned with halos in the iconography of Kelly Latimore, a Missouri artist whose popular works adorn a growing number of homes and shrines. Describing these and other inspirational figures as saints illustrates that manifestations of the divine are not limited to ancient settings, […]]]>

Martin Luther King Jr., Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Maya Angelou and Mister Rogers are crowned with halos in the iconography of Kelly Latimore, a Missouri artist whose popular works adorn a growing number of homes and shrines.

Describing these and other inspirational figures as saints illustrates that manifestations of the divine are not limited to ancient settings, Latimore said. “I’m always looking for ways iconography can be used to shed light on the different ways Christ is prominently displayed in the world and in all of our communities.”

“Good Samaritan”, by Kelly Latimore

In other pieces, Latimore incorporates familiar biblical events and characters into modern clothing and settings, such as the Good Samaritan helping a victim of the Flint, Michigan water crisis, Jesus portrayed as homeless modern and Mary, Joseph and the child Jesus represented. as contemporary refugees and asylum seekers.

Latimore says he employs the icon style for these and other renders because it does more than just present images of important people and situations.

“Any art can create more dialogue, but icons help us look at God in a new way and help us see ourselves and our neighbors in a new way. Icons put symbols together in such a way that they are beautiful, and you can easily understand what is going on.

As Orthodox Christians have long known, icons also invite viewers into an adoring relationship with the sacred, he said. “Icons can be revered and help us see the sacredness of everyone. In their traditional sense, icons can guide us in thought, word and prayer.

Another quality of iconography is its ability to make viewers contemporary with their subjects, said Robert Black, rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Salisbury, North Carolina. We are part of something that continues to unfold.

Robert Black

Black Parish commissioned and installed two 5ft by 7ft Latimore Icons, one featuring the Transfiguration of Christ, the other depicting the Descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. Both were hung on the back wall of the shrine and dedicated earlier this year.

Although the works generally follow the Orthodox format for these two biblical events, both also differ significantly from most Western-influenced stained glass depictions.

In other words, the characters have dark skin. “’The Transfiguration’ exalts the Jewishness of Jesus. We wanted it to emphasize the Jewishness of Christ and our faith,” Black said.

The other room features people of different races, genders and ages wearing contemporary or ancient clothing and gathered around a table as they encounter the Holy Spirit.

“We wanted people to come into the church to find someone like them in this picture.”

“We asked Kelly not to feel constrained by traditional depictions of Pentecost,” Black said. “We wanted people to come into the church to find someone like them in this picture.”

St. Luke’s contacted Latimore after investigating its stained glass windows following the death of George Floyd and the ensuing social unrest, he said. “We were in conversation with African American leaders at the time and realized that if they walked into St. Luke’s and saw our stained glass windows, they would say, ‘This is a white people’s church.’ At the end of our study, we confirmed that we had a lot of characters that seemed to come out of 17th century France.

Icons commissioned by St. Luke’s

Since the icons were hung on the back wall of the sanctuary, the church receives frequent visitors, including foreigners, who come to see the works.

“The icons are quite large and the colors are vibrant and radiant, and they remind me of the wonderful diversity of the body of Christ and that these are living traditions,” Black said.

Latimore, 36, was a part-time landscape and portrait painter living and working in an intentional Christian farming community when he was asked to create an icon representing the spirit of ministry.

“It was called ‘Christ Considers the Lilies.’ It was a good first try. The lines were a bit shaky. Jesus is almost surprised that the lilies are in his hands. That was in 2010,” he explained.

But the Ohio community adopted the icon, which became part of its visual identity. And it wasn’t long before other members were asking for custom icons.

This sparked an awareness of the spiritual power of icons, Latimore said. “Iconography can be a benchmark for the thought, prayer and, above all, the action of a community.”

La Sagrada Familia by Kelly Latimore

The 2016 election year also propelled Latimore iconography forward. “There was this rise in the country of a lot of anti-foreigner and anti-refugee rhetoric, and that was really troubling to me.”

In response, he painted a picture of a modern version of the holy family as refugees fleeing through the desert. “That image – ‘La Sagrada Familia’ – blew everything up,” added Latimore, who said he was primarily involved with the Episcopal Church.

He added that he considered himself to be a painter of icons, rather than one who “prays” them or “writes” them in the traditional sense of iconography. “I’ve always considered it painting because that’s really what it does.”

Today, Latimore iconography ranges from church-commissioned images such as Christ on the Throne or Jesus as Good Shepherd, to social justice themes that may or may not evoke scriptural scenes or settings.

In “The Good Neighbor”, an African-American woman is the Good Samaritan who serves clean water to a black man and victim of toxic water in Flint.

“This one came from a group pastors involved in the Flint water crisis who thought I would paint a picture of how people in power hurt their neighbors,” the artist explained.

“Jesus Breaks the Gun” by Kelly Latimore

“Jesus Breaks Rifle” was a response to several high-profile shootings that culminated in the massacre of Texas school children in May. “After the Uvalde shooting, I thought how sad it is that we protect guns on children,” he said.

Icons can show individuals and communities how to respond to tragedy, he added. “There is this need now in the church for new representations of God and Christ in images that will move us forward and lead to change.”

Depicting Jesus and others in scripture in darker skin colors is another change Latimore said he tries to inspire through his iconography. “In America, especially in our sacred art, we have encased Jesus in a single image, a blue-eyed white representation of Jesus. But there is a growing conversation in the church around saints of color and more accurate portrayals of Jesus as a Middle Eastern man.

Latimore added that he is also pushing back the tradition of what and who is considered a saint and how they are chosen as such.

Kelly Latimore

“For me, in the church for the first 1,000 years, it was the local congregations and the people who chose the saints and the people they knew who had lived lives of love and compassion and cared for the poor and sick.”

“Mom”, by Kelly Latimore

Icons in which Desmond Tutu, James Baldwin, Flannery O’Connor, John Lewis, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Fannie Lou Hamer are adorned with halos intentionally contradicting the control that religious hierarchies currently have over sainthood, he said. “These people showed us something about what it means to be Christ in the world. They are physical representations of God’s life in the world. They also show us that miracles are not something in the clouds, but are expressed when someone loved where it hurts and created communion and love in the world.

And that is precisely the role of icons, believes Latimore.

“My greatest hope for my work is to create a dialogue around sacred art. Is it just glorified wallpaper, or could it be something that galvanizes us into thought and action? How can we bring more art into our spaces to create more conversation, especially with the tougher topics unfolding in our world? »

Related Articles:

Q&A with Daniel Bonnell on the transmission of the sacred in modern art

Study asks how art influences faith

A pastoral dilemma between art and nudity: embodied faith and the education of children in the church | Review by Mark Wingfield

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Harry L. Martin commemorated at special Veterans Day ceremony https://kcacm.org/harry-l-martin-commemorated-at-special-veterans-day-ceremony/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 10:01:41 +0000 https://kcacm.org/harry-l-martin-commemorated-at-special-veterans-day-ceremony/ A special Veterans Day ceremony Friday at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church paid special tribute to the winner of the Congressional Medal of Honor, 1st Lt. Harry L. Martin. “Few communities can boast of having a Medal of Honor winner,” Mayor Jeff Reser said in his opening remarks. Martin, a Marine killed March 26, 1945 while […]]]>

A special Veterans Day ceremony Friday at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church paid special tribute to the winner of the Congressional Medal of Honor, 1st Lt. Harry L. Martin.

“Few communities can boast of having a Medal of Honor winner,” Mayor Jeff Reser said in his opening remarks. Martin, a Marine killed March 26, 1945 while fighting the Japanese on Iwo Jima, paid the ultimate price for his country and will not be forgotten. “It is fitting that we come together to keep his memory alive. Much of this responsibility for keeping his memory alive is carried out by the Bucyrus Historical Society.”

The ceremony served a dual purpose, both commemorating Veterans Day and celebrating the opening of the historic group’s upcoming exhibit honoring Martin. It was originally planned to take place outside the Scroggs House Museum, which is across the street, but was moved to the Church Sanctuary due to rain.

Dr. John Kurtz, president of the historical society, noted that such commemorations “do not happen by chance”. He thanked Randy Fischer and the Society’s Events Committee for organizing it; and the surviving members of Martin’s family, who “graciously donated so many of Harry’s memorabilia and artifacts to our museum”.

Retired Marine Corps corporal Ty Bowers, left, reads a letter Harry L. Martin's mother received after his death, written by his commanding officer, Captain Mason H Morse.  The letter details Martin's heroic actions.

Lt. Gen. Norman Smith talks about Iwo Jima

The keynote speaker for the day was retired United States Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Norman Smith. Smith graduated from Bucyrus High School in 1951 and attended the Reserve Officers Training Corps, or ROTC, in college before being commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He served for 36 years, retiring in 1991.

Smith, 89, spoke by phone from his home in Virginia. He traveled to Iwo Jima several times and described the conditions under which Martin fought.

“Iwo Jima is a 4 by 8 mile volcanic island; it’s sort of shaped like a pork chop,” he said. “The landing beach is over a mile long; consists of black volcanic sand arranged in terraces. The Marines had enormous difficulty moving through the sand, as their feet sank deep into it.”

Doug Wilson, left, and Ty Bowers listen to closing remarks during a special Veterans Day ceremony Friday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church.  The event included a special tribute to the winner of the Congressional Medal of Honor, 1st Lt. Harry L. Martin.

The island was heavily fortified by Japanese troops. “The gruesome, intense and brutal fighting was characterized by close quarters fighting on the island,” Smith said. Nearly 7,000 Marines died in the battle and many more were injured. The Japanese lost about 22,000; almost the entire garrison.

Smith also explained why the island was so important.

“Iwo Jima is 600 miles from mainland Japan, which is the perfect safe place for battle-damaged American warplanes to land after sustaining damage in the bombing of Japan,” Smith explained. “An estimated 25,000 American airmen were rescued on the runways of Iwo Jima when the warplanes they were flying could not make the long return flight from missions over Japan to their bases. home base in the Marianas.”

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Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief teams converge on Idabel after tornado https://kcacm.org/oklahoma-baptist-disaster-relief-teams-converge-on-idabel-after-tornado/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 13:03:18 +0000 https://kcacm.org/oklahoma-baptist-disaster-relief-teams-converge-on-idabel-after-tornado/ IDABEL — Volunteers from a local faith group have been busy helping survivors of a recent tornado, including a congregation whose church building was destroyed in the storm. Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief crews converged on Idabel a day after a tornado swept through the town. Sam Porter, acting director of Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief, said […]]]>

IDABEL — Volunteers from a local faith group have been busy helping survivors of a recent tornado, including a congregation whose church building was destroyed in the storm.

Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief crews converged on Idabel a day after a tornado swept through the town.

Sam Porter, acting director of Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief, said disaster relief volunteers were helping Reverend Don Myer and his congregation following the destruction of Trinity Baptist Church, where Myer serves as pastor. . More than 200 church members gathered for worship in the church parking lot on Sunday.

Myer told The Associated Press that Trinity Baptist was preparing to complete a new building when the storm tore through their sanctuary and flattened the shell of the nearby new structure. The 250-member congregation was due to vote after Sunday service on whether to go ahead with final works to complete the building, Myer said.

“But we haven’t come to that. Every vote counts and we had one vote outweigh all of us,” said Myer, 67. “We were close to doing it. That’s how close we were.”

A member of the Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief team helps clear tree branches and debris following a tornado that hit parts of Idabel.

Myer said the congregation will pray over what happened, see how much their insurance covers, and work to rebuild.

Meanwhile, Porter said Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief has four chainsaw crews serving in southeast Oklahoma to help clean up downed trees, tree limbs and debris. He said the group’s food crews are preparing meals for storm survivors at First Baptist Church in Idabel, where Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief has set up an incident command post.

An Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief team member uses a chainsaw to cut a fallen tree branch in Idabel.

Members of the Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief team also traveled to Calera to help Calera First Baptist Church, which also suffered damage in the November 4 storm.

Porter said volunteer disaster relief teams were also in Daytona Beach, Fla., helping people whose lives were turned upside down by Hurricane Ian in September. He said more than 60 Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief members, along with Baptist disaster relief teams from other states, are helping Floridians clear mud from water-damaged structures.

CONTRIBUTE: The Associated Press

how to help

For more information about Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief or to donate, go to https://www.okdisasterhelp.org/donate/ or send your donations to: BGCO, ​​Attn: Disaster Relief, 3800 N May Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73112.

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Why a local church is transforming the old Striking Lanes bowling alley https://kcacm.org/why-a-local-church-is-transforming-the-old-striking-lanes-bowling-alley/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 02:36:03 +0000 https://kcacm.org/why-a-local-church-is-transforming-the-old-striking-lanes-bowling-alley/ TWP HARTLAND. –The lanes, shoe rental, bar and grill are gone from the former Striking Lanes bowling alley at 1535 N. Old US 23, which closed last year after a local church purchased it. FloodGate Church is currently working to complete the renovations, which include a large sanctuary, stage and youth halls, in time to […]]]>

TWP HARTLAND. –The lanes, shoe rental, bar and grill are gone from the former Striking Lanes bowling alley at 1535 N. Old US 23, which closed last year after a local church purchased it.

FloodGate Church is currently working to complete the renovations, which include a large sanctuary, stage and youth halls, in time to hold their first Sunday service in the new location in mid-December.

The church has also purchased land around the old bowling alley, which includes working baseball diamonds and a former miniature golf course. Church officials say possible additional plans for the roughly 45-acre site could include creating a community park with an amphitheater, trails and other features, and baseball leagues could potentially return with four diamonds.

Pastor Bill Bolin said the church purchased the building and property for about $2.2 million and renovations are expected to cost about $2.5 million. He said the church raised more than $1 million through donations and sold its current location at 1623 S. Old US 23 near Brighton to Alive Family Church, which is currently located in Oceola Township. near Howell.

Bolin said the congregation outgrew his current church in Brighton Township because attendance at services jumped from hundreds to thousands during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We chose to stay open for a number of reasons,” Bolin said. “We didn’t close a single Sunday.”

The former bowling alley at Striking Lanes, featured on Wednesday, November 2, 2022, will soon be home to the FloodGate Church congregation.

He said FloodGate Church was among religious institutions in Michigan opposing state-issued emergency mandates banning people from gathering in public, including in church, during the early days of the pandemic.

In May 2020, Governor Gretchen Whitmer revised an executive order to allow people to gather for public religious worship after some churches filed a lawsuit.

Bolin said 125 to 150 people attended FloodGate Church before the pandemic.

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Death Notice – November 3, 2022 – TheCountyRecord.net https://kcacm.org/death-notice-november-3-2022-thecountyrecord-net/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 00:25:28 +0000 https://kcacm.org/death-notice-november-3-2022-thecountyrecord-net/ MAJOR M. GODWIN Mr. Major M. Godwin of Orlando, Florida, but formerly of Blountstown, Florida, left this life Thursday, October 20, 2022 at Advent Health Orlando. Mr. Godwin was a member of Saint Mark African Methodist Episcopal Church in Orlando, Florida. Homegoing Celebration of Life services were held Saturday, October 29, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. […]]]>

MAJOR M. GODWIN

Mr. Major M. Godwin of Orlando, Florida, but formerly of Blountstown, Florida, left this life Thursday, October 20, 2022 at Advent Health Orlando.

Mr. Godwin was a member of Saint Mark African Methodist Episcopal Church in Orlando, Florida.

Homegoing Celebration of Life services were held Saturday, October 29, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. from the Sanctuary of Rivertown Community Church located at 19359 Hwy 71 South in Blountstown, FL 32424 with Elder Pretis Godwin II, officiating.

Vann Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.

Interment followed at Magnolia Cemetery located at 326 13th Street in Blountstown, Florida.

A public screening was held on Friday, October 28, 2022, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., at Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church located at 16345 SE River Street in Blountstown, Florida 32424.

He leaves to cherish a lifetime of loving but treasured memories, a loving and devoted family: his devoted and loving wife Renae Godwin of Orlando, Florida; six daughters, Unita Ivory-Bush of Jacksonville, Florida, Trisha Smarr of Atlanta, Georgia, Sabrina Godwin and Lucretia Simmons both of Tallahassee, Florida, Akwete (Chris) Baker-Jackson of Blountstown, Florida and Amari Godwin of Orlando in Florida; two sons, Maurice Godwin of Miami, Florida and De’Angelo Godwin of Atlanta, Georgia; six sisters, Saffronia Arline of Jacksonville, Florida, Jacqueline (Roland) Lord of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Mary Williams of New Orleans, Louisiana, Dorothy Heller and Diann Jackson both of Blountstown, Florida and Vivian (Danny) Black of Bristol, Florida; two brothers, Pretis (Rose) Godwin of Lakeland, Florida and Derit (Toretha) Godwin of Greenwood, Florida and a host of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.


LINDA STONE ARRANT

On a cold February day in 1957, Carl “Rooster” and Shirley Stone had a third daughter, Linda Nell, born at Dr. Snyder’s clinic in Blountstown. Linda was taken in by her older sisters, Patsy and Janice. Their lives would never be the same again. Linda grew up on her parents’ farm on County Road 69A where she raised an orphan calf named Pistol Pete. She sold Pistol Pete to raise money for his braces. As a young girl, she had a pair of red cowboy boots that she loved. The way she kept them on her super skinny feet was a testament to how much she loved them. Linda was the only girl with her father’s blue eyes. From her mother, she inherited the courage to speak her mind.

Her grandparents, Jess and Bessie Stone, were very involved in her young life, and her maternal grandparents, Lucius and Lena Johnson, lived just down the street. Thus, she was blessed with an extended loving environment.

As parents and paternal grandparents, Linda attended Altha School and graduated in 1975, where she developed deep and lasting friendships with Danny Carol Register and Bonnie Childs. They became the Three Ya-Yas.

In 1979, Linda met the love of her life, Steve Arrant. On October 22, 1983, they had a country-themed wedding ceremony in the front yard of his sister, Patsy. Steve was his rock and his world. They recently celebrated their 39th anniversary. Steve always wrote Linda a beautiful poem every birthday. Together they raised their daughter, Sandra Nicole. Sandra was blessed with an older brother, Stevie.

She never met a stranger and when you saw Linda she had a big smile, sparkling blue eyes, an easy laugh and she expressed her love to you and wished you a blessed day. She also had a knack for speaking her mind, whether you wanted to hear it or not! Such candor is a rare gift.

She retired from DOC this year and was known for her strong work ethic and ability to speak her mind.

Linda loved being Austin’s stepmother and adored her nephews and nieces.

Friday afternoon, October 28th, while at home, Linda passed away unexpectedly with her beloved, Steve by her side. A lot of comfort was taken in imagining his reunion with Sandra. She was predeceased by her beloved daughter, Sandra, and her father Carl “Rooster” Stone and stepfather JB Arrant.

Linda is survived by her husband, Steve Arrant, her stepson, Stevie Arrant (Tanya), her mother Shirley Stone Bussey, her sisters Janice Kirkland (Dennis), Patsy Parker, (Joe), stepmother Nancy Ruth Arrant, step-grandson Austin Arrant, brother-in-law Tony Arrant (Kathy) and several much loved nieces and nephews.

A memorial service is planned later. As Linda was a huge animal lover, contributions to Partners for Pet Adoption Center, 4011 Maintenance Drive, Marianna 32448 would be a fitting memorial.


J

ESSE WAYNE PADGET

Jesse Wayne Padgett, 72, of Marianna, Florida, died Friday, October 28, 2022. Wayne was born November 26, 1949, in Belle Glade, Florida to John and Inez Padgett. Wayne had lived in the area for 30 years from Orlando, Florida. He was a graduate of Maynard Evans High School and Jones College. Served in the Air Force and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was also a retired Florida State correctional probation officer. Wayne loved his grandchildren and especially enjoyed watching them play sports. He was an avid Florida Gators fan, loved golf, dancing and country music. Wayne was predeceased by his parents, John Padgett and Inez Padgett; sister, Linda Jackson.

Survivors include, wife, Patricia Padgett; sons, Lee Temples (Andra), Jason Temples (Kim); daughter, Monica Lisboa (Kenneth Davidson); brother, Steve Padgett; sisters, Charlene Corbitt (Larry), Renee Holderbach (Brian Kaczmarek); brother-in-law, Dave Jackson; grandchildren, KayLeigh Temples, Chloe Temples, Deacon Temples, Kennedy Temples, Kinslee Temples, Hudson Temples, Anthony Lisboa, KJ Davidson; great-grandson, Noel Lisboa; several nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends on Thursday, November 3, 2022, from 1:00 p.m. (CT) to 2:00 p.m. (CT) at the Peavy Funeral Home Chapel. The memorial service will begin at 2:00 p.m. (CT) with the Reverend Michael Morris officiating. The memorial will be by cremation. The family asks that no flowers be sent. Donations can be made to family or a favorite charity.

All arrangements are under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown, FL. 850-674-2266.


HELEN DELORIS McCOURT

Helen Deloris McCourt, 68, of Altha, Fla. died Friday, October 28, 2022. Helen was born May 19, 1954, in Richwood, WV to Charles and Nellie Sparks. She had lived in the Altha area for 21 years after moving from Clarksburg, WV. Helen was a homemaker, a member of the Baptist faith and loved taking care of people.

Survivors include, husband, Danny McCourt of Altha, FL; sons, Evan Lee Sparks of Mossy Pond, FL, Charles E. Thomas of Summersville, WV; brothers, William Sparks of Webster Springs, WV, Thomas Michael Sparks of Webster Springs, WV; several grandchildren.

The memorial will be by cremation with a memorial service at a later date.

All arrangements are under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown, FL. 850-674-2266.


DOUGLAS STEVEN TIPTON

Douglas Steven Tipton, 63, of Altha, Florida died on Friday, October 21, 2022. Doug was born February 4, 1959, in Ohio to Langlie Odell and Margaret Reynolds Tipton. He was a truck driver who loved his family, his friends, his dogs and his model trucks. Doug was a warm, loving and amazing father, grandfather, brother and friend. He was a person who looked past someone’s mistakes, always ready to love someone anyway. He helped those around him without ever accepting anything in return. He was stupid and proud, choosing to live and die his way. He spent his days in his yard or indoors watching sports or westerns with his dogs. When he was not at home, he could be found with his friends sharing a coffee and a story or fishing with his son. He will be missed but his legacy of love will continue to be shared by all of us.

He is survived by his son, Adam Lerch (Natasha) of Altha, FL; daughter, Jessie Chapman of Ohio; brothers, Gary Tipton and John Tipton both of Ohio; sister, Paula Tipton of Ohio; 7 grandchildren.

The memorial will be by cremation with a memorial service to be scheduled at a later date.

All arrangements are under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown, FL. 850-674-2266.

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Autumn Swings with 4 free live performances in November for Philly’s innovative music organization, The Jazz Sanctuary https://kcacm.org/autumn-swings-with-4-free-live-performances-in-november-for-phillys-innovative-music-organization-the-jazz-sanctuary/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/autumn-swings-with-4-free-live-performances-in-november-for-phillys-innovative-music-organization-the-jazz-sanctuary/ Autumn Swings with 4 free live concerts in November for Philadelphia’s most innovative music organization, The Jazz Sanctuary. The Jazz Sanctuary kicks off the nonprofit performing arts group’s second decade in 2022. We have emerged from the pandemic and people continue to attend our events in greater numbers. November promises to be a wonderful month. […]]]>

Autumn Swings with 4 free live concerts in November for Philadelphia’s most innovative music organization, The Jazz Sanctuary.

The Jazz Sanctuary kicks off the nonprofit performing arts group’s second decade in 2022.

We have emerged from the pandemic and people continue to attend our events in greater numbers. November promises to be a wonderful month.

— Alan Segal, Founder and Executive Director, The Jazz Sanctuary

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, USA, Nov. 1, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Fall is swinging, with four free live concerts in November for The Jazz Sanctuary, Philadelphia’s most innovative music organization.

“This year has been amazing,” said Alan Segal, Founder and Executive Director of The Jazz Sanctuary. “We have emerged from the pandemic and people continue to attend our events in greater numbers. November promises to be a wonderful month, with events at Church of the Incarnation, St. Peter’s Glenside, Hadley’s Restaurant, Trinity Church Buckingham and Main Line Unitarian. The number of events this year? 70! We will reach 695 events in 11 years by the end of this year, and we are planning our 750th live concert next summer, which we are planning as a big party.

The November performance schedule begins on Thursday 3 November and 8 September with an evening of ‘Jazz & Joe’ (live music, coffee and sweets) at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation in Yardley (1505 Makefield Road
Morrisville, Pennsylvania 19067). This performance, which begins at 7:30 p.m., features The Jazz Sanctuary Quintet, including James Dell’Orefice (piano), Leon Jordan Sr. (drums), Randy Sutin (vibration/percussion), Eddie Etkins (saxophone) and Alan Segal ( low). This concert is free.

On Sunday, November 6, the Jazz Sanctuary Quintet will travel to Glenside, where they will provide music for morning services at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church (654 N. Easton Rd., Glenside, PA 19038). Services start at 10 a.m.

Another evening of “Jazz & Joe” with The Jazz Sanctuary quintet is scheduled for Thursday, November 10 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Buckingham (Routes 202 and 413, Buckingham, PA 18912). The Segal (bass). This concert, which begins at 7:30 p.m., is free.

A two-part video from The Jazz Sanctuary’s recent concert on Monday, June 6 is now available on The Jazz Sanctuary’s website at https://thejazzsanctuary.com/jazzn-joe-video/.

Updated information on all upcoming Jazz Sanctuary events can be found at https://thejazzsanctuary.com/schedule-of-events-updated-weekly/.

Donations to support Jazz Sanctuary’s mission continue to be essential to the growth of the organization as it enters its second decade. The Jazz Sanctuary is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides free jazz music to charities, community centers, and places of worship, among others.

Since its founding in 2011, The Jazz Sanctuary has performed more than 675 live shows in Philadelphia and surrounding suburbs in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Additionally, the organization brings its music to healthcare facilities, including regular performances for the Council on Brain Injury and others in the region.

Charitable events in the five county area have served organizations such as Friendship Circle, Cradle of Hope, Ronald McDonald House, Interfaith Hospital Center of the Main Line and Council on Brain Injury and Re-Med golf outing and therapy sessions.

Funding for The Jazz Sanctuary comes from individual donors as well as sponsors including CBIZ, Compass Ion Advisors, Philadelphia Federal Credit Union, The Big Event, Zled Lighting, Quantum Think and DMG Global.

Interested donors or sponsors, as well as local townships, places of worship, community centers or other public venues interested in participating in or hosting live Jazz Sanctuary events are encouraged to contact Alan Segal directly, either by phone at (215) 208-7314 or by email at music@thejazzsanctuary.com. Additional information is available at http://www.thejazzsanctuary.com.

Jim DeLorenzo
Jim DeLorenzo Public Relations
+ +1 215-266-5943
jim@jhdenterprises.com
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In concert, musicians from Jazz Sanctuary in Bethlehem, PA on June 6, 2022 (part 1)

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Architect of Texas’ sweeping abortion law targets new state https://kcacm.org/architect-of-texas-sweeping-abortion-law-targets-new-state/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 14:51:22 +0000 https://kcacm.org/architect-of-texas-sweeping-abortion-law-targets-new-state/ Mark Lee Dickson sings songs of praise during a worship service Sept. 1, 2021 at Trinity Church in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images) Mark Lee Dickson sings songs of praise during a worship service Sept. 1, 2021 at Trinity Church in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images) Mark […]]]>

Mark Lee Dickson sings songs of praise during a worship service Sept. 1, 2021 at Trinity Church in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Mark Lee Dickson sings songs of praise during a worship service Sept. 1, 2021 at Trinity Church in Lubbock, Texas. (Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Mark Lee Dickson is on a mission to criminalize abortion in the state of Texas. A pastor and the leader of Right to Life of East Texas – as well as a self-identified “36 year old virgin-Dickson traveled to 400 towns in Texas in 2019, encouraging cities to declare themselves “sanctuary cities for the unborn” and to pass ordinances banning abortion. He was successful, helping pass nearly 50 ordinances banning abortion in cities across Texas and a handful of other states.

Her accomplishments on the road launched her career as one of the nation’s best-known anti-abortion advocates.

Dickson’s legislative strategy to ban city-level abortions paved the way for Texas’ vigilante six-week abortion ban that went into effect last year. The anti-abortion lawyer, along with attorney and former Texas Solicitor General Jonathan Mitchell, formulated an enforcement mechanism that would circumvent any legal or legal challenge: delegate enforcement to private citizens, rather than forces law enforcement or other government agencies. It took place in towns across Texas, until Dickson and Mitchell took their idea statewide. With the help of Texas Republicans, Dickson helped craft Senate Bill 8—the most extreme abortion restriction at the time—which financially incentivized individuals to sue anyone who aids or abets Texans trying to get abortions beyond six weeks.

Unlike other recent attempts to ban abortion in early pregnancy, SB 8 was able to survive legal challenges when Roe v. Wade was still the law of the land. The measure, arguably one of the first major warning signs that Roe would soon fall, was a huge victory for abortion opponents like Dickson.

Fast forward a full year and Roe is dead. More than a dozen states, including Texas, have enacted near-total abortion bans, forcing many Americans to travel to other states for care.

Dickson, triumphant in Texas, now turned to New Mexico, a state where many Texans have fled to access critical abortion care.

Two New Mexico towns near the Texas border are discussing abortion bans within their city limits that will come to a vote in the coming weeks, and a handful of other communities in the region, including the City of Lovington and County of Lea are discussing similar measures. . The city council of Clovis, a farming town in eastern New Mexico, will vote on Nov. 3 on an ordinance to ban abortion providers and criminalize sending abortion drugs or pills through the mail. And the city commission in Hobbs, a town about 2.5 hours south of Clovis, voted overwhelmingly earlier this month to proceed with an ordinance banning abortion. A final vote in Hobbs is scheduled for November 7.

Dickson was a central figure behind both of these proposals.

He has been in communication with Clovis residents for over a year to make the town a ‘sanctuary town for unborn children’, Dickson says Eastern New Mexico News earlier this month.

“I just answered a call. All I did was go where the Lord called me,” Dickson said. I could do it myself. I went ahead saying, “God help me. God help this town. I can’t do this alone. We can’t do this alone. We’re going to need your help.'”

Dickson spoke at an anti-abortion rally in Hobbs earlier this month, alongside other abortion opponents from Texas and New Mexico. He can also be seen clapping in the background of a Hobbs City council meeting after an all-male council voted unanimously to pass an ordinance banning abortion.

Neither Clovis nor Hobbs have abortion clinics within their city limits, but some reproductive health organizations have expressed interest in expanding abortion services to Texas border towns to accommodate the influx of patients traveling in New Mexico. Amy Hagstrom Miller, President and CEO of Whole Woman’s Health, recently said she would like to offer services in or around Clovis, Hobbs and Roswell, another town in New Mexico near the Texas border.

Dickson is trying to anticipate such a move. “We know abortion providers want to set up shop right here in these towns that are just minutes from the Texas border,” Dickson said. told Reuters after a recent Hobbs Town Commission meeting. “They want to attract as many Texas residents as possible for abortions right here in New Mexico.”

The Clovis and Hobbs orders are likely to face legal challenges if passed, but similar measures in Texas, also led by Dickson, have survived previous lawsuits. There are currently eight abortion clinics in New Mexico. The closest for residents of Clovis and Hobbs are in Albuquerque, a four to five hour drive away.

Many Texans and Oklahomans have fled to New Mexico in order to access abortion care over the past year. Since 2021, when Texas’ vigilante abortion ban went into effect, New Mexico has taken in a flood of Texas patients, with a clinic reports that he was booked for four weeks and that 75% of his patients were from Texas. Following Roe’s overthrow, the southwestern state became home to several clinics that were forced to close and relocate including the Jackson Women’s Health Organizationthe Mississippi clinic at the center of the Supreme Court case that ended national abortion protections.

New Mexico is also one of five states that provide crucial abortion care later in pregnancy, as there is no legal limit on abortion in the state.

There is a chance, albeit slim, that the next election could change that. Joe Biden won New Mexico by a nearly 11% margin of victory over Donald Trump in the 2020 election, and Democrats hold the governor’s seat and a majority in both houses of the state legislature. It’s a largely pro-choice state, though some pockets — including rural areas like those Dickson targets — are more conservative.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) is currently leading her GOP rival, abortion opponent Mark Ronchetti, of about 7.5 points in the polls. Dickson has supported Ronchetti on several occasions, recently posting a photo of himself with the contestant on Facebook and writing that Ronchetti “be a serious upgrade” by Lujan Grisham.

During his primary, Ronchetti ran on a “strongly pro-life” platform in which he said he would oppose abortion “at all stages” and that “unborn babies have a soul, can feel emotions and are very much a human being”. But after Roe’s fall this summer, Ronchetti began to backtrack on her strong anti-abortion views — apparently take a page from Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin’s playbook (R).

Now Ronchetti describes himself as a moderate, saying he would “seek common ground on abortion” and calling for a 15-week ban. Just last month Ronchetti ran a campaign ad again downplaying his anti-abortion stance and proposing a statewide vote on a constitutional amendment on abortion to “give people a voice.”

But Dickson still supports Ronchetti. During the Clovis Municipal Commission meeting earlier this month, Dickson claimed that he and Ronchetti had recently discussed the ordinances banning abortion.

“I was talking to Mark Ronchetti, and I was telling him a while ago what was happening here tonight. And I said, you know, this is what you’re talking about…among the people, the communities deciding this issue,” Dickson said, addressing the city commission board.

“I said, when Clovis does this, don’t ruin the occasion,” he continued. “Stand with the people of Clovis, support the people of Hobbs, support the people of New Mexico who are pro-life and want to see this state, these counties, these cities, move forward with the heart of what New Mexicans have. really believe.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.

Related…

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Redemption of your church campus for guests https://kcacm.org/redemption-of-your-church-campus-for-guests/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/redemption-of-your-church-campus-for-guests/ By reconnecting with your neighbors, you will bring the church back to the forefront of what was missing – a deep community connection. As weekly attendance has declined for many established churches, it has become more apparent that the church building is no longer conducive to what the church needs today. Any change brings both […]]]>

By reconnecting with your neighbors, you will bring the church back to the forefront of what was missing – a deep community connection.

As weekly attendance has declined for many established churches, it has become more apparent that the church building is no longer conducive to what the church needs today. Any change brings both perspective and positive excitement about what’s to come. It depends on which side of the fence you are viewing the change.

Throughout scripture, men and women have sought change, not for change, but to redeem what God had originally brought forth. Likewise, the church is always called to adapt and move forward in the present future that God has for the local church. Change, while frightening, can be rewarding if the church is willing to buy back guest space that is currently underutilized or not at all.

Reclaiming the past and bringing it into the future.

The local church campus is steeped in history. With such a rich history come fiefdoms that retain past practices, room assignments, and furnishings that become little idols within the church. When redeeming space to prepare for the future, a leader must navigate the minefield of glory days to reclaim what God wants to do today.

Although the footprint of a traditional church building need not change, the inner workings, from the naming of rooms to the design of the sanctuary, might need to change to accommodate new ideas and the new era in which the church came in. Instead of thinking of church as “mine,” start looking at church as a place “to come.” The local church can still celebrate the past but focus on the needs of the present while preparing for the future.

At my local church, we are reclaiming a small hallway as a museum of the past. We will place plaques, photos, etc., in this space to honor who we have been, but we will redesign the interior of the church’s footprint by transforming the classrooms into a cafe and a mission center where we collect and package items for missionary outreach programs.

Be creative with your current space by being Christ to the people inside the church, knowing that change is not easy, but always look to what guests or the community need outside. the church and dream of what might be in the redesigned space.

Repair to present a good face forward.

When you see the local church through the eyes of the guests, you begin to see the needs of the church. How often have you or the local church prayed for guests who come and don’t stay? Is it because you haven’t prepared the church for guests? Sometimes it’s cleaning around a classroom or taking items from the foyer to prepare for the guests who are coming.

As you begin to examine your current space, you’ll likely see things that you’ve grown accustomed to over time. Deferred maintenance issues will come to the fore, and a plan should be devised to begin tackling the issues. Having a plan is the first step, but the plan must be implemented and not debated for eternity. By dividing the repair plan, you can reduce the overwhelming list of small jobs that can be handled with the right resources and actions.

Think of it this way: if a guest came to your house, you would probably fix things, clean cobwebs from corners of rooms, dust, dispose of trash, and move things that don’t belong. This is what the repair is to presenting a good face. It gears up for the guests that come through your doors and is ready to fully accommodate them with a clean, organized, and serviceable repair facility.

Restore what has been lost.

The established church has faced many losses over the years – lack of attendance, dwindling donations, fewer children and a lack of community involvement. But through it all, God remained. Have you ever wondered; why did I stay through all the change? Most likely it is because of God. God has called you and those around you to the church you serve. It is not by accident but by divine appointment that God has kept you in such a challenging place. Yet, in the difficult season, God is still working.

As you begin to see the church campus as a connection point (starting point) for community engagement, you begin to see where God is challenging your leadership to step out of your spiritual comfort zone to achieve the lost from the community. The God you serve is a great God. Trust him and trust yourself as you lead people to restore what has been lost.

Remove programs that do not fit today’s vision.

Do you have enough people to run the programs you currently have listed in the directory? Probably not, and your church is not alone. Instead of offering a cafeteria-style programmatic listing for everyone, focus on what you can do well to reach the most people. This may mean that programs that were successful 25 years ago will have to be retired, and those human and financial resources will be reallocated to a new area.

Focus on what the church has and assess whether it meets the needs of the community. If not, then the church needs to pivot by placing resources where God can make the most of what the church has.

As the programs are withdrawn, it is an opportunity to celebrate what God has done through the church in the past. Highlight people who have helped lead the programs in the past to let them know that what they have done has brought value to the kingdom as the church celebrates its history. Introduce the new program and highlight the leaders who will lead the programs in the future. Ask former programmatic leaders to pray over new leaders to show continuity of service to the local church and the wider community.

By removing programs that no longer fit the culture of today, you begin to extend the community to another generation through slight modifications and programs that reach followers of Christ today.

Renew your commitment to join your neighbours.

There was a time when the church could open its doors three times a week, and the parking lot was full. Many churches today do not have young families. Even in the midst of decline, there is hope found in Christ. You can’t go back and change yesterday, but you can start over today. Renew the church’s commitment to reaching your neighbors by discovering the needs of those around you and striving to meet those needs.

Outside the walls of the established church is a community that is almost forgotten. The church was once part of their life, but they don’t know who the neighbors are today. By reconnecting through listening, learning about needs and responding to community needs with church neighbors, you will bring the church back to the forefront of what was missing, i.e. say a deep community connection.

Guests can become members if the church is willing to buy out its current space for the future needs of the community. Redeeming the church footprint for guests is not a new program or a quick fix. But a partnership with God and his people inside and outside the church. A partnership to live like Christ not just on Sundays but throughout the week with the church and its neighbors walking hand in hand.

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