Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 04:18:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Church Sanctuary – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 Plan to sell Buchanan Parish Church angers community https://kcacm.org/plan-to-sell-buchanan-parish-church-angers-community/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 04:00:01 +0000 https://kcacm.org/plan-to-sell-buchanan-parish-church-angers-community/ A church on the shores of Loch Lomond believed to have a direct link to the Kirk’s origins is under threat of closure, sparking a community campaign backed by the current Duke of Montrose. Buchanan Parish Church was built in 1764 and has served the villages of Balmaha, Milton of Buchanan, Buchanan Smithy, Rowardennan and […]]]>

A church on the shores of Loch Lomond believed to have a direct link to the Kirk’s origins is under threat of closure, sparking a community campaign backed by the current Duke of Montrose.

Buchanan Parish Church was built in 1764 and has served the villages of Balmaha, Milton of Buchanan, Buchanan Smithy, Rowardennan and the islands for generations.

However, the parish can trace its roots back to 700 AD and the island of Inchcailloch, now best known as the family graveyard of Rob Roy’s Clan MacGregor and one of Robert the Bruce’s favorite deer hunting grounds .

The Church of Scotland deemed the church’s surplus on List B to meet requirements and presented plans to sell it.

Church elder Alison Bruce said the parish disagreed with the claim that the building was not fit for purpose, saying it was both regularly attended and in good condition.

She said the community may seek to acquire the church and run it as an independent congregation if the presbytery follows its plan.

READ MORE: Christians left in ‘deep crisis’ as churches shut in lockdown

The church was first built after a gift from the third Duke of Montrose, who funded a move from his first house on Inchcailloch, which was established in honor of St Kentigerna.

She lived and died there in 793 AD and is said to have been married to the grandson of Artur de Dal Riata – one of the princes of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada – and was the mother of St Fillan.

HeraldScotland:

Gaelic for ‘island of the hooded woman’ or ‘island of the nun’, Inchcailloch was part of a sanctuary area used by Robert the Bruce, which he later formalized when he became king.

A community campaign was launched to save the building, with hundreds of people banding together to try and change the minds of the local consistory.

Ms Bruce said: “Our congregation is very good hearted and we have regular church attendance which is both in fantastic condition both physically and spiritually.

READ MORE: Threat of Outlander Town Abbey Sale Angers Residents

“We disagree with the rectory’s assessment that the church is ‘not fit for purpose’.

“Buchanan Parish Church is more than just a building, it is a direct link to the early days of the Church of Scotland and a vital part of the community.

“It is not even a financial burden on the Church, so we cannot at all understand the rationale for this proposal and urge a rethink.

“Stirling Rectory has made no effort to consult with the wider local community about this move.

She added, “We hope the Church will allow us to reach a compromise.

“If not, we might consider acquiring it and running it as an independent congregation.”

The Duke of Montrose, James Graham, is a member of the church and has backed the campaign to save it.

HeraldScotland:

He said: “The church remains an important community hub, having served the villages of Balmaha, Milton de Buchanan, Buchanan Smithy, Rowardennan and the islands for generations.

“Church members play an important and very active role in caring for the needs of the region, and it has served as the backbone for many events.

“Despite the upheaval in the surrounding economy, he has proven to be a financial contributor to Stirling Rectory for many years and I am convinced he should be allowed to continue.”

A Church of Scotland spokesperson said: “The change is necessary in order to provide sustainable and realistic new expressions of ministry and the church and to ensure that all buildings are fit for purpose in the mission. 21st century.

“It’s a work in progress and no final decision has been made.

“Mission plans are to be prepared by all presbyteries of the Church of Scotland and ultimately approved by the Faith Nurture Forum and the Chief Stewards of the Church of Scotland by 31 December 2022 and will be subject to a annual review.”

An online petition has been filed at https://bit.ly/savebuchananchurch.

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Remembering Eldress Mary Henderson | New https://kcacm.org/remembering-eldress-mary-henderson-new/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/remembering-eldress-mary-henderson-new/ The Eldress Mary Henderson is now “forever at her service” after Henderson County lost a beloved member of its community on August 4. Pastor Henderson is the current Athens Citizen of the Year, as she is loved not only by her congregation, but by the entire community. She had previously stated that her goal in […]]]>

The Eldress Mary Henderson is now “forever at her service” after Henderson County lost a beloved member of its community on August 4.

Pastor Henderson is the current Athens Citizen of the Year, as she is loved not only by her congregation, but by the entire community. She had previously stated that her goal in life was “to shine her image daily and stay in the shadows and let Jesus shine within” and many would agree that she did.

Known as more than just a pastor and as “Aunt Mary” or “Aunt Pastor” to many, she was a friend to everyone she met. Most describe Eldress Henderson as a woman of God with quiet strength who presented herself in a male-dominated pastoral world with style, grace and class.

Having served in ministry for more than 40 years, including helping with Sunday school and singing, Henderson took over as senior pastor of the General Assembly Church of the Living God in the 1990s. and led the church with exemplary service and leadership for the past. 27 years.

Eldress Henderson grew up on Hamlett Street in Athens and graduated from Fisher High. On June 29, Mary and her husband Tom celebrated 59 years of marriage and their daughter described them as “a great example of what God can do if only you keep him first.”

During Henderson’s years as a pastor at COTLG, the church built a Family Life Center, which is a gathering place for special events, brought high-speed internet capabilities to the infrastructure, and installed a microphone system. in the sanctuary.

Community was something that was very important to her and over the years Henderson blessed many organizations with her servant heart. Some she has been affiliated with include Henderson County Arts Council, Adoptive Parent of Lady Cards, Ministry of Prison, Athens Race Task Force, Henderson Co. IMA, NAACP-BAT, l Athens Ministerial Alliance, March for Jesus, ETMC Chaplain, Athens ISD Crime Fighters, and many more.

Condolences continue to go out to her family and her community church that she loved and who loved her. The details of the celebration of life will be given soon.

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On its 100th anniversary, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral moves the bones of its first priest to Charlotte – From the Archdiocese https://kcacm.org/on-its-100th-anniversary-holy-trinity-greek-orthodox-cathedral-moves-the-bones-of-its-first-priest-to-charlotte-from-the-archdiocese/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 20:20:31 +0000 https://kcacm.org/on-its-100th-anniversary-holy-trinity-greek-orthodox-cathedral-moves-the-bones-of-its-first-priest-to-charlotte-from-the-archdiocese/ Father Jonathan Resmini kisses the casket during the reburial of Father Polycarpos Krithinakis at Evergreen Cemetery in Charlotte. On its 100th anniversary, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral moves the bones of its first priest to Charlotte Posted in The Charlotte Ledger on August 2, 2022 Father Polycarpos Krithinakis was buried. Still. His connection to Charlotte […]]]>

Father Jonathan Resmini kisses the casket during the reburial of Father Polycarpos Krithinakis at Evergreen Cemetery in Charlotte.

On its 100th anniversary, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral moves the bones of its first priest to Charlotte

Posted in The Charlotte Ledger on August 2, 2022

Father Polycarpos Krithinakis was buried. Still.

His connection to Charlotte dates back almost a century, when he was the first full-time priest assigned to the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral. The story we’re about to tell is how his journey brought him back to Charlotte — specifically Evergreen Cemetery — one July morning all these years later.

Father P, as we will respectfully call him for the sake of simplicity, was born in 1882 on the Greek island of Crete. In 1915, at age 33, less than a month after being ordained, he sailed for America aboard the SS Patri. It was known as an immigrant ship for obvious reasons.

He devoted his short life to serving as a priest in the Greek Orthodox Church. Records from a century ago are hard to come by. Here’s what we found. During his 23 years in our country, Father P led 10 parishes in seven states. His stops included Syracuse, NY; Akron, Ohio; Canton, Ohio; Charlotte, Akron again, Detroit and finally Minot, ND

Charlotte and Minot are the two essential stages in this story.

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Charlotte was founded in 1923. Father P was the first full-time priest assigned to the parish, serving from 1926-28. The hope was that his arrival might spark the construction of the first building of the congregation. Parishioners first met at the downtown Chamber of Commerce office. But for reasons lost in time, he wasn’t in Charlotte long enough for that to happen. In 1928, he was assigned a second time to the parish of Akron, then to another in Detroit.

In 1937, he was transferred to the Greek Orthodox parish of Minot. The city, which had a population of less than 20,000 at the time, attracted Greek immigrants to help build and maintain the Great Northern Railway that linked Minneapolis to Seattle. The parish needed a leader. Alas, Father P had to resign due to poor health. Fifteen months after his arrival in Minot, he died on August 10, 1938. He was 56 years old.

Father P was buried at Rosehill Memorial Park in Minot. Perhaps because English is the parishioners’ second language, the headstone identifies him as a GREEK PREIST.

Vivian Maragos Zimmerman has spent her entire life in Minot, worshiping at the Greek Orthodox parish. His father emigrated to America from his Greek village in the 1920s. Laying railroad tracks, he worked his way west. For reasons lost in time, he got as far as Minot and stopped. She was too young to have known Father P. But she has vivid childhood memories of her mother taking her to Rosehill to visit relatives’ graves. There, they took a few moments to stop at the tomb of Father P.

“My mother always had a feeling of sadness when she stood by her monument,” Vivian recalled. “She said he was a kind and good man, sensitive to people, but he seemed depressed.”

She long wondered if her depression stemmed from her posting to what was then a small north-central town in a cold and desolate state. Could this have contributed to his untimely death? “Nowadays,” Vivian said, “it would be characterized by him not eating and kind of passing out.”

Dead and buried, you’d guess the story ends there.

Not so fast.

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2023. It has grown into a thriving religious community with 1,100 families, its East Boulevard campus a Charlotte landmark. For those who still can’t place it, Holy Trinity is home to the Yiasou Greek Festival which welcomes thousands of people for food and all things Greek. This year’s festival will take place from September 8 to 11.

To build excitement for the centenary, Holy Trinity organizes monthly events to mark the occasion. Between Father P.

“What better way to celebrate an anniversary than to bring our first priest home, where he can be cared for and not forgotten,” said Father Jonathan Resmini, spiritual leader of Holy Trinity.

The idea was inspired. Now to run it.

The Holy Trinity obtained permission from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America to dig up Father P and rebury him in Charlotte. Exhumation is the process by which a body is legally exhumed from its “final” resting place. Here, there is a large Greek Orthodox community to watch over Father P. There, in Minot, there is not much left of the parish. While the city is now home to nearly 50,000 people, the original Greek Orthodox parish has closed. A new parish has 30 members. That’s not a lot, but at least enough to run a food truck selling gyros at the North Dakota State Fair held every July in Minot.

Virginia was at the cemetery on July 11 for the exhumation, although she chose to leave before she could see what was left of Father P.

Working for four hours in the summer heat, not knowing what they would find, cemetery workers dug down to the wooden coffin, eight feet instead of the typical six. The dirt was wet. First they used a backhoe, then shovels so as not to damage what was left. Eighty-four years after Father P’s burial, they have arrived at their destination. They found his skeleton intact, including the skull, jaw and legs. There was more: they recovered the rubber sole of a shoe and pieces of his cloth garment, green with gold trim.

“I was filled with amazement and awe,” said funeral director Andrew Bahanovich of Charlotte, who led the effort with Minot funeral director Ben Slind. “Being Orthodox and the son of a priest, it was very personal for me, a once in a lifetime experience.” Andrew works with Kenneth W. Poe Funeral & Cremation Service, which handles many Greek funerals in Charlotte.

The remains were brought back to a wooden board that was apparently part of the bottom of the coffin. It was placed in a plastic-lined metal container and flown to Charlotte by Delta Air Lines.

Father P arrived on July 22. Four days later, 40 Holy Trinity parishioners offered an official welcome home during a brief service in the sanctuary. Father Remini told the assembly that even as time passes, we remain bound by the relationships we forged long ago. This includes the priest who was there at the beginning of the journey of the Holy Trinity.

The motorcade to Evergreen Cemetery off Central Avenue took 30 minutes. Father P was buried in a simple poplar coffin.

Vivian, who visited Father P’s grave as a little girl, wished she could come to Charlotte for her second funeral. When Father P was presumably last buried, she was cooking spinach and cheese triangles to sell in the parish food truck at the State Fair.

“Having been to his grave so many times,” Vivian said, “I wish I was there for the final chapter.”

Ken Garfield is a freelance writer/writer specializing in obituaries. Join it at [email protected].

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Conversation – Heritage Russia Ukraine | https://kcacm.org/conversation-heritage-russia-ukraine/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/conversation-heritage-russia-ukraine/ More than 160 Ukrainian cultural sites have been damaged or destroyed since Russia invaded the country in February 2022, according to UNESCO. The Ukrainian government says the number of damaged sites is much higher. Russia denies these accusations. An important monument under threat is Saint Sophia’s Cathedral in Kyiv. Built in the 11th century, the […]]]>

More than 160 Ukrainian cultural sites have been damaged or destroyed since Russia invaded the country in February 2022, according to UNESCO.

The Ukrainian government says the number of damaged sites is much higher. Russia denies these accusations.

An important monument under threat is Saint Sophia’s Cathedral in Kyiv. Built in the 11th century, the church is one of the seven Ukrainian World Heritage Sites recognized by the United Nations. It represents the common Orthodox Christian faith shared by many Russians and Ukrainians.

Hagia Sophia and the Byzantine Model

Saint Sophia Cathedral was built during the reign of Grand Prince Yaroslav the Wise, whose father, Volodymyr – also known as Vladimir – had adopted Orthodox Christianity in 988.

According to a legend in the “Primary Chronicle” of the early 12th century, Volodymyr chose Orthodoxy for the beauty of his worship services. The emissaries he sent to Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, visited the famous Church of Holy Wisdom, the Hagia Sophia. Built by Emperor Justinian in the 6th century, the Hagia Sophia is dedicated to Divine Wisdom, who is personified by a woman in the biblical “Book of Proverbs”. Convinced by the favorable report of his envoys, Volodymyr decides to be baptized and to convert his subjects.

After Volodymyr’s death, Yaroslav invited Byzantine architects and artists to build an impressive cathedral for Kyiv, much like the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. Yaroslav, who had waged a civil war to succeed his father, deliberately emulated the Byzantine capital to establish his legitimacy. Its new cathedral, Hagia Sophia, even takes its name from the imperial church of Constantinople.

Christian symbolism in the cathedral

With 13 cupolas and a central dome that rises 29 meters (about 95 feet) into the air, Hagia Sophia is an imposing structure that served as a testament to the power and piety of its ruler. Elaborate mosaics decorate the sanctuary and the dome. Portraits of Yaroslav and his family are prominently displayed in the cathedral’s princely gallery, where the ruler attended services.

A mosaic of the Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, stands in the apse above the altar. Raising her hands in prayer, Mary is framed by a Greek inscription from Psalm 46: “God is in her midst; She will not be moved.

Imagery and language are borrowed from Byzantium. Just as she was considered a powerful divine protector of Constantinople, Mary now protects Kyiv. The large central dome is adorned with a mosaic of an almighty image of Christ, known as “Christ Pantocrator”, who watches his followers from his throne.

Art historian Elena Boeck calls Hagia Sophia “the most ambitious Orthodox church built in the 11th century”.

Decline and restoration

Saint Sophia Cathedral was consecrated in 1049 and completed around 1062. As Kyiv’s power and importance declined, the church suffered from external attack and internal neglect.

In 1169, the northern prince Andrei Bogolubskii of Vladimir sacked Kyiv – an event that the head of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, Metropolitan Epifaniy, compared to the current Russian invasion. Mongol attacks in 1240, 1416 and 1482 further damaged the cathedral.

Restoration work in the 17th century in the Baroque style radically changed the external appearance of the cathedral. The exterior walls have been plastered and whitewashed. The church was bombed during the Russian Civil War in 1918. Under Soviet rule, communists looted its treasury and secularized the building, which became a museum. In the 1940s, the church again suffered German occupation.

Saint Sophia Cathedral is a monument of East Slavic cultural heritage shared by Russians and Ukrainians. Its extraordinary Byzantine mosaics and frescoes have survived nearly a millennium.

Today, as during the Second World War, Ukraine is invaded by a foreign army which threatens this heritage.

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The Church that nurtured Father Kapaun’s faith | National Catholic Registry https://kcacm.org/the-church-that-nurtured-father-kapauns-faith-national-catholic-registry/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 10:00:21 +0000 https://kcacm.org/the-church-that-nurtured-father-kapauns-faith-national-catholic-registry/ On September 25, 2021, St. John Nepomucene Church in Pilsen, Kansas welcomed home his natal son, Father Emil Kapaun, who died as a martyr on May 23, 1951, in Chinese Prison Camp No. 5 in South Korea. North. His remains were not identified until March 2021. Now he had returned briefly to the town and […]]]>

On September 25, 2021, St. John Nepomucene Church in Pilsen, Kansas welcomed home his natal son, Father Emil Kapaun, who died as a martyr on May 23, 1951, in Chinese Prison Camp No. 5 in South Korea. North. His remains were not identified until March 2021. Now he had returned briefly to the town and church he grew up in. He is buried in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Wichita.

Born on Maundy Thursday in 1916, he was baptized soon after in the new St. John Nepomucene Church, which had opened a year earlier. He made his first confession, his first communion and his confirmation in this parish. He was the first son of St. John Nepomucene to be ordained a priest. He celebrated his first mass here and was then assigned to this church as a new assistant priest and later administrator. Now at home, the faithful come to pay homage to him.

Although St. John Nepomucene has changed on the inside over the years, there are still many things Father Kapaun would recognize, including some of the clothing he once wore that is now on display in the Father Kapaun Museum located in the original parsonage where he lived until he became a military chaplain during World War II. The many visitors from all over the country who come to this church-museum to get to know Father Kapaun or pray for the intercession of the Servant of God have a tangible link with this heroic chaplain whose cause for canonization officially opened in 2008. .

The main altar of the church is the same on which Father Kapaun celebrated mass on several occasions. Beneath the centered tabernacle, a delightful interpretation of the Last Supper carved in high relief appears in beautifully colored detail. The altar and the altarpiece are in carved wood. While in Father Kapaun’s time the wood was left natural, during the 2001-2002 renovations it was painted white, bringing out the beauty of the intricate carvings of the altarpiece up to the top of its triples gothic towers. These towers, with their filigree spiers, are set at angles that emphasize the overall Gothic design. Abundant gold gilding enhances the beauty of the altarpiece by highlighting the abundance of filigrees and crosses.

The large central tower of the altarpiece includes a vaulted and canopied sanctuary which houses a statue of Saint John Nepomucene. The bohemian saint is depicted depicted with a finger to his lips. The pose speaks of the patronage of this saint: he is the patron saint of confessors. As confessor to the Queen of Bohemia, he would not break the seal of confession when the king demanded to know what she was saying. For his silence, the holy priest was thrown into the river Moldau (Vltava) and drowned.

On each side of the statue of this saint, slightly smaller shrines in their lace towers honor, on the right, our Blessed Mother, represented crowned as Mary Victorious, and on the left, Saint Agnes of Bohemia, represented wearing the habit of ‘a Poor Clare; the crown at her feet shows that she renounced her royal position for Our Lord.

Born in Prague to the King of Bohemia, she is promised to marry King Henry III of England. She asked the pope to intervene because she wanted to be consecrated to Christ. Henry consented to her decision. She founded a monastery in Poor Clare and Saint Clare personally wrote to her several times. Related to Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Agnes is one of the patron saints of Bohemia.

The blue painted gothic arched walls and ceiling of the apse suggest the great love for our Blessed Mother in this church community. The wall behind the altarpiece was also filled in during the last renovation with a motif of golden fleur-de-lis. And in the ceiling of the apse now appears a mural of the Holy Spirit hovering over the altar and the sacrifice that takes place there.

On either side of the sanctuary, the shrines resemble the high altar, with their filigree ornamental triple spiers, but on a slightly smaller scale. To the right, the main spire shrine honors a loving Saint Anne with her child Mary appearing in a large statue. Next to it are statues of Saint Joseph and the Immaculate Heart. A large colorful statue of the Sacred Heart, depicted with arms outstretched in welcome, appears in front of this sanctuary.

Something very rare appears under the Altar of St. Anne – a rendering of Christ’s tomb with an almost life-size statue of Jesus resting in the tomb – a favorite place of contemplation for visits, explained Harriet Bina, director of the Museum of Father Kapaun.

On the other side of the sanctuary, the corresponding side sanctuary features an image of Saint Wenceslas. In the slightly smaller shrines beside it, there is a fine statue of Jesus as the Good Shepherd, holding a lamb on his shoulders, and another of Saint Anthony. Wenceslaus is not only the good Christmas carol king, but was a king of Bohemia in the 10th century. He is the patron saint of Bohemians and the Czech Republic. Fittingly, his feast day is September 28, a day falling in time when Father Kapaun was at his parish on September 25, 2021, and the days following when he was brought to Wichita for his official funeral on September 29.

St. Wenceslas was the name of the church when the first edifice was built in 1888. This frame building built by the first Bohemians to arrive here was replaced by a second edifice, then a third – named the Church of St. John Nepomucene. Opened on September 18, 1915, today’s beautiful neo-Gothic brick church was ready to welcome parishioners who came to farm these plains of Kansas. The farm of Father Kapaun’s parents, Enos and Elizabeth (Bessie), was only 5 kilometers away.

The bohemian heritage is also reflected on the facade of the church: statues honor the two brothers Sts. Cyril and Methodius, called the “Apostles of the Slavs”.

Indeed, some of the first stained glass windows that worshipers see upon entering the church show “the parishioners’ strong religious ties to their home countries,” Bina said. Among them appears Saint Wenceslas and his grandmother, Saint Ludmila, represented teaching him the faith; Cyril and Methodius bringing Christianity to the Slav people; and the baptism of Ludmila’s husband, Borivoj, the first prince of Bohemia to become a Christian.

The many stained glass windows, which also include biblical scenes such as the Nativity and the Resurrection, were made at the turn of the 20th century by the Munich Studio in Chicago, whose founder had studied in Germany. With ornaments and realistic facial expressions for the characters, the windows look very similar to the classic German windows favored at that time.

As the new parish priest in 1953, Mgr. Arthur Tonne was worried about window weather – literally, given that the area is prone to tornadoes. But over the years, any tornado “went over the church,” Bina said, attributing the help to “Father Kapaun [who was] a very good baseball player.

Much of what has been removed over the years has been retained and reused during renovations. For example, the doors of the original communion rail carved with images of the Sacred Heart and the Immaculate Heart became the front and back of the new freestanding altar made in 2001 to match the rest of the church. While years ago the original communion rail was removed, another somewhat shorter but now spanning the sanctuary has been restored.

The original Stations of the Cross, beautifully carved reliefs framed in exceptional carved Gothic frames that echo the triple spiers and lacework design of the altarpiece, have been repainted.

Speaking of originals, people who come to the church and museum also learn that the baptismal font is in all three churches, just like the baptismal font. Together with all the parishioners of Pilsen, Father Kapaun and his brother Eugene were baptized in this baptismal font. And the large cross attached to the pew at the front of the church is the heavy processional cross that Father Kapaun carried as an altar boy and was used at his first mass and again at his funeral in 2021.

At the rear of the nave, near the seventh station, is a memorial to Father Kapaun – whom the men in the prison camp considered another Christ for his selfless help and encouragement. It includes a photo of him in his chaplain’s uniform, some paintings and two crucifixes. The museum of the old presbytery presents many personal effects and artefacts of this saint in the making.

Among them are the paten and the purse which he used during his first mass and his paten used during his funeral mass in Pilsen. (His official funeral was held later, in Wichita, 72 miles away.) Several fine garments on display include a chasuble and a cope he wore. Bina pointed out that her mother Bessie did the beautiful crochet work all around the edges of her surplice.

Among the exhibits are religious objects and statues from the Kapaun household, photographs of him and his family, the trunk of his grandparents when they emigrated to America which contained porcelain used in Eugene’s wedding and photos that Emil sent to his mother from Japan with representations. of the Sacred Heart made in Japanese, and another of the Holy Family made in Chinese. Near these display cases is the portable folding kneeler confessional that Father Kapaun used in church to hear the confessions of schoolchildren.

Another room contains personal effects donated by his brother Eugene and his wife Helen. Among them are the footlocker Father Kapaun left for Japan (he went to Korea with only a gym bag) and two closets full of items that were returned to his parents two years after his death. As Bina said, “The locker finally arrived on Good Friday.”

Also on display is Chaplain Kapaun’s Medal of Honor, which was awarded posthumously in 2013. Bina said he gave one of the men in the prison camp his little gold pyx and told him, “Take this to my bishop and tell him that I am dead. a happy death.

While he was among the 1,500 men who died in Prison Camp No. 5, Bina pointed out that the fewest number died among the very many men with whom Father Kapaun was able to pray, inspire, heal their wounds and filled with hope. It is a noble legacy for one of the residents of Pilsen and St. John Nepomucene.

Father Kapaun, pray for us!

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Gillette school supply drive for children in need begins August 5 https://kcacm.org/gillette-school-supply-drive-for-children-in-need-begins-august-5/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 01:16:12 +0000 https://kcacm.org/gillette-school-supply-drive-for-children-in-need-begins-august-5/ Gillette, Wyo. – Last year, members of the Gillette community donated 33,000 school supplies to children in need in the Campbell Community School District. They exceeded levels seen in any other community in the Salvation Army’s Intermountain Division, which includes Wyoming, Utah, Colorado and about half of Montana. “So let’s do it again, Gillette,” said […]]]>

Gillette, Wyo. – Last year, members of the Gillette community donated 33,000 school supplies to children in need in the Campbell Community School District.

They exceeded levels seen in any other community in the Salvation Army’s Intermountain Division, which includes Wyoming, Utah, Colorado and about half of Montana.

“So let’s do it again, Gillette,” said Jenny Hartung, Salvation Army director of Gillette, Wyoming.

At the fourth annual drive, representatives from the Gillette Assistance League of the Salvation Army, St. Matthew’s Catholic Community and First United Methodist Church will be outside the entrances to Gillette’s Walmart at 2300 S. Douglas Hwy , from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 5 and 6.

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Community members can either drop school supplies into the school bus-shaped boxes or make a monetary donation into the red kettles. Cash donations will be used to purchase additional school supplies. Hartung asks donors to avoid giving pencils, which won’t work well in the heat of the day of the collection.

Volunteers are needed to help sort school supplies from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 12 at First United Methodist Church, 2000 W. Lakeway Rd.

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About 100 volunteers will be needed on Aug. 13 for the community school supply fair, Hartung said. Volunteers will help pack food for the Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies and help children fill their backpacks with the supplies they need to succeed in school. A morning crew will also help with set-up, while the afternoon crew will help with clean-up.

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. that day, children will be able to select backpacks and school supplies categorized by school and age group from the church sanctuary. Rapscallions Barbershop will provide free haircuts, and From Me to You will provide new and gently used late summer and fall clothes. Families can collect vouchers for free sports physical sessions.

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Rapscallions Barbershop is offering free haircuts at last year’s fair. (The Salvation Army)

“It gives all the kids a good start,” Hartung said.

Parents are asked to leave sick children at home and inform the event organizers that they are collecting their child’s backpack. Although schools provide lists of required supplies on site, it is helpful for parents if they can bring their own copy.

About 100 families per hour tend to come to the fair to pick up school supplies. (The Salvation Army)

No phone calls can be taken on event day at event speed, Hartung said. More than 100 people tend to show up every hour for school supply pickup.

Anyone with questions prior to the event can call the Salvation Army office at 307-682-6982. Volunteers should call the office to register for shifts on August 12 and 13. August 13 shifts are 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 12:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

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Port Huron church destroyed by fire Tuesday night https://kcacm.org/port-huron-church-destroyed-by-fire-tuesday-night/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 02:26:15 +0000 https://kcacm.org/port-huron-church-destroyed-by-fire-tuesday-night/ Pastor Kim Brown said no one was inside Zion Cathedral of Praise early Tuesday evening when a fire broke out, leaving the building on the south side of Port Huron a total loss. More than two hours after fire crews from four departments arrived, she sat nearby, surrounded by a group of supporters – all […]]]>

Pastor Kim Brown said no one was inside Zion Cathedral of Praise early Tuesday evening when a fire broke out, leaving the building on the south side of Port Huron a total loss.

More than two hours after fire crews from four departments arrived, she sat nearby, surrounded by a group of supporters – all praising God with gratitude.

“We were here, we went out to eat, and when we went out to eat, whatever happened happened next,” Brown said. “Thank you, Jesus, there was no one in the church.”

Port Huron Fire Battalion Chief James Hayes said the fire was reported around 6:15 p.m. at the church, located at the corner of Moak and 30th streets.

While the fire was brought under control in 30 to 45 minutes, he said, water was still sprayed on the building shortly before 9 p.m. to control hot spots.

Hayes said part of the church was completely engulfed in flames when they arrived. The origin of the fire has not been elucidated and the investigation was still ongoing on Tuesday evening. No injuries were reported.

Zion Cathedral of the Church of Praise was a total loss following a fire on Tuesday.

“You could see everything through the eaves, and it started coming up through the vents in the roof,” Hayes said. “They grabbed some handlines, set up the antenna and started spraying, and all the other crews arrived.”

In addition to Port Huron, firefighters from the township of Port Huron, Marysville and Fort Gratiot helped fight the blaze.

A staple of advocacy and the local black community, Zion has a history that spans more than eight decades.

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Pope set to issue historic apology for school abuse in Canada https://kcacm.org/pope-set-to-issue-historic-apology-for-school-abuse-in-canada/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 04:13:57 +0000 https://kcacm.org/pope-set-to-issue-historic-apology-for-school-abuse-in-canada/ By PETER SMITH, Associated Press EDMONTON, Alta. (AP) — Thousands of Indigenous people are expected to converge on the small Alberta prairie community of Maskwacis on Monday to hear Pope Francis’ long-awaited apology for generations of abuse and cultural suppression at Canada’s Catholic residential schools. Francis is due to arrive mid-morning at the site of […]]]>

By PETER SMITH, Associated Press

EDMONTON, Alta. (AP) — Thousands of Indigenous people are expected to converge on the small Alberta prairie community of Maskwacis on Monday to hear Pope Francis’ long-awaited apology for generations of abuse and cultural suppression at Canada’s Catholic residential schools.

Francis is due to arrive mid-morning at the site of the former Ermineskin Indian Residential School, now largely demolished. He will pause at the sites of the old school and nearby cemetery before speaking in a large open space to school survivors, their relatives and other well-wishers.

Francis arrived in Edmonton on Sunday, where he was greeted by representatives of Canada’s three major Indigenous groups – First Nations, Métis and Inuit – as well as political and religious dignitaries. The pope spent the rest of the day resting in a seminary in the provincial capital.

The Canadian government has admitted physical and sexual abuse was endemic in state-funded Christian schools that operated from the 19th century to the 1970s. Some 150,000 Indigenous children were taken from their families and forced to attend in the goal of isolating them from the influence of their homes, native languages ​​and cultures and assimilating them into the Christian society of Canada.

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Francis’ six-day trip – which will also include other sites in Alberta, Quebec and Iqaluit, Nunavut, in the Far North – follows meetings he held in the spring at the Vatican with delegations from First Nations, Métis and Inuit. These meetings culminated in a historic apology on April 1 for “deplorable” abuses committed by some Catholic missionaries in residential schools.

Thousands of children died from disease, fires and other causes. The discovery of hundreds of potential burial sites in former schools over the past year has drawn international attention to the legacy of the schools in Canada and their counterparts in the United States.

Francis is now following through on his commitment to deliver this apology on Canadian soil.

Maskwacis, about an hour south of Edmonton, is the hub of four Cree nations.

Event organizers said they would do everything possible to ensure survivors could attend the event. Many will travel from park-and-ride lots, and organizers recognize that many survivors are elderly and will need accessible vehicles, diabetic-friendly snacks and other amenities.

Catholics operated the majority of Canadian schools, while various Protestant denominations operated others in conjunction with the government.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who apologized last year for “incredibly harmful government policy” in organizing the residential school system, will also attend the Maskwacis event with other government officials.

In Maskwacis, the old school that Francis visits has been replaced by a school system operated by the four local Cree Nations. The program affirms the once suppressed indigenous culture.

Chief Greg Desjarlais of Frog Lake First Nation in northern Alberta, a survivor of the school, said after the Pope’s arrival on Sunday there were “mixed emotions across this country” at the during his visit.

“I am thinking today of the young people who have not returned home and who are buried around the boarding schools,” he said during a press conference after the welcoming ceremony at the airport. But he expressed optimism that the visit can begin to bring reconciliation.

“I know when two people have apologized, we feel better,” he said. “But our people have been through a lot. … Our people have been traumatized. Some of them did not return home. Now I hope the world will understand why our people are so hurt.

On Monday afternoon, Francis is scheduled to visit the Church of the Sacred Heart of the First Peoples, a Catholic parish in Edmonton oriented toward Indigenous peoples and culture. The church, whose sanctuary was dedicated last week after being restored after a fire, incorporates indigenous language and customs into the liturgy.

“I never thought in my life that I would see a pope here at Sacred Heart Church,” said Fernie Marty, who holds the title of elder in the church. “And now we have this opportunity.”

During Francis’ visit, the church will display the clothing, bread and other supplies it regularly provides to those in need, including much of Edmonton’s urban Aboriginal population estimated at 75,000.

The visit will be a “meeting” that will help “people know what we are, who we are”, said its pastor, the Reverend Jesu Susai.

Associated Press reporters Nicole Winfield in Edmonton and Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.

Associated Press religious coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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St. John the Divine’s Annual Greek Food Festival Brings Community Together Through Culture | News, Sports, Jobs https://kcacm.org/st-john-the-divines-annual-greek-food-festival-brings-community-together-through-culture-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 11:29:07 +0000 https://kcacm.org/st-john-the-divines-annual-greek-food-festival-brings-community-together-through-culture-news-sports-jobs/ WHEELING — The parishioners of St. John the Divine Greek Orthodox Church will welcome everyone to their 21st annual Greek Food Festival in Center Wheeling this week. The festival will take place from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, July 27-30. “We hope our guests will have a wonderful […]]]>


WHEELING — The parishioners of St. John the Divine Greek Orthodox Church will welcome everyone to their 21st annual Greek Food Festival in Center Wheeling this week.

The festival will take place from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, July 27-30.

“We hope our guests will have a wonderful experience at our food festival, and we look forward to sharing with them our zeal for the gift of life, love of brotherhood and hospitality,” said Gus Kayafas, festival director.

Authentic food, electric atmosphere and infectious hospitality make this festival one not to miss this summer.

There’s something for everyone, and parishioners look forward to sharing their faith, food and fun with everyone.

The festive exterior decor allows visitors to taste the famous gyro sandwiches, tavern fries, wings or chicken skewer.

A flambé and aged cheese called saganaki will be served daily after 4 p.m.

Young people in the community prepare golden fried honey puffs, lemonade and baklava sundaes day and night.

The Agape Dancers will perform the exciting and colorful dances from various parts of Greece daily to live authentic Greek music provided by an Ohio Valley favorite, The Greek Company.

In addition to outdoor activities, available upstairs in the Hellenic Center room, there will be a variety of festival favorites such as pastitsio, moussaka, spanakopita, stuffed grape leaves and Greek salad from the village, as well as an abundant selection of delicious homemade Greek pastries. Tasty food products, uniquely authentic to Greek culture, are offered. Vendors will also be present, allowing guests to take home a piece of Greece.

However, parishioners’ greatest desire is to share the beauty of the Orthodox Christian faith with all.

While visiting the food festival, consider learning more about the Orthodox Christian Church by visiting the bookstore, joining one of the church tours, listening to one of the liturgical chant demonstrations and, of course, course, conversing with the father. Demetrios if anyone has any questions about the old faith.

The shrine will be open at noon, 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. daily during the festival.

New this year at the tavern, a delicious novelty, a “mezze” (appetizer in Greek), of minced gyro meat, sautéed on the grill with peppers, onions and feta and served with fried pita triangles.

Back this year, the popular ‘Fun with Fillo’ cooking demonstrations are back. Maria Kayafas will present for three days at 2 p.m. — Wednesday through Friday, July 27-29, at the second-floor Education Center.

Maria will show you how to make Kataifi. This is a traditional and very popular Greek dessert made of shredded filo wrapped around a mixture of sweet almonds and walnuts and dipped in a buttery syrup…it’s just amazing!

“In Greek culture there is a tradition of philotimo, the love of doing good to people,” said Maria Kayafas. “This is reflected in our cuisine, our desire to show hospitality to guests, neighbors and family as we eagerly prepare Greek dishes to share our love for others. It’s just another way of sharing our culture.

Our popular Kafenio, a Greek cafe, returns this year with an anticipated fanfare.

Danyelle Dunlevy, 18, shared her excitement.

“We are thrilled to bring back a festival favorite introduced last year this year,” she said. “You don’t want to miss the kafenio for a frozen smoothie, baklava cheesecake, and ladopsomo, a sweet fried bread.”

Again for this year, all food sales will be in person, with no pre-orders in the Hellenic Center upstairs. Food can be packed up by the team of friendly volunteers to take home or enjoyed in one of the outdoor dining tents.

Follow on Facebook at Grecian Fest 2022 for the latest updates and news, or go online and browse www.grecianfest.com for more information or to download a menu. Call 304-233-0757 with any questions.

The festival is located in the historic Center Market area, and plenty of free parking will be available on Chapline Street and the grounds in front of the church.



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Navajo Missionaries on ‘Reverse Mission’ at Vacation Bible School in Hampton – Daily Press https://kcacm.org/navajo-missionaries-on-reverse-mission-at-vacation-bible-school-in-hampton-daily-press/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 12:35:22 +0000 https://kcacm.org/navajo-missionaries-on-reverse-mission-at-vacation-bible-school-in-hampton-daily-press/ HAMPTON — The 13 believers formed a circle, their hands outstretched toward the skylight of the Fox Hill United Methodist Church sanctuary. They prayed that the “reverse mission” they were planning would flood the congregation with energy and camaraderie. Eight of them looked exhausted but excited. They had spent 30 of the past 40 hours […]]]>

HAMPTON — The 13 believers formed a circle, their hands outstretched toward the skylight of the Fox Hill United Methodist Church sanctuary. They prayed that the “reverse mission” they were planning would flood the congregation with energy and camaraderie.

Eight of them looked exhausted but excited. They had spent 30 of the past 40 hours in a white van, driving from Utah and New Mexico. Navajo missionaries would run the Fox Hill Vacation Bible School, sing songs in the Diné Navajo language, and teach Bible stories.

Historically, Christian missionaries carried baggage beyond suitcases; early European and American missionaries flocked to native tribes to further the political goals of their governments. Some modern missionaries are more missionary tourists, more concerned with serving their ego than the people. But Brian Sixbey, Fox Hill’s senior pastor, sought to reverse that narrative – he believed his congregation could learn more from a ‘reverse mission’ than they could teach.

“Father God,” he said as he led group prayer that Saturday, “help us to become one.”

___

The Fox Hill congregation was more excited that Sixbey had never seen them for the summer program. The church had an abundance of volunteers and 70 children signed up the first night. Him, his wife Shan and Becky Holland had the idea for the mission. Holland is a 77-year-old Hampton native who leads the clean water ministry.

At a time when churches are increasingly divided along political and social lines, Sixbey said, he hoped his congregation could learn the values ​​he saw when he visited the Navajo reservation in May — a faith pure, grounded and united. Fox Hill raised more than $11,000 to bring missionaries here for the program, which ran July 12-15.

A few weeks ago, however, Sixbey received a call: a group of missionaries had contracted COVID-19. Holland called Hilda Begay, a Navajo pastor from the Beautiful Mountain Christian Center in New Mexico.

“What are you doing next week?” asked Holland. She told Begay about the situation they were in.

“Can you come?”

Begay consulted with her husband, who is co-pastor of Beautiful Mountain. He works as a mechanic and hasn’t had enough vacation time for the trip. But he spoke with his boss, who told him, “As long as you do God’s work, we’ll let you go.

The couple drove from Farmington, stopping only to eat, pump gas and use the bathroom, and arrived just hours before that Saturday meeting.

Sisters Esther Reddoor and Cecilia Wallace came from Utah. The couple spend their summers driving Wallace’s old SUV across the reservation to feed children and their parents, delivering masks and flour in the scorching Southwest heat.

“Becky calls us Martha and Ruth because we’re always there to feed children and families,” Wallace said, referring to women in the Bible.

The Navajo Reservation is the largest in the United States, covering approximately 27,000 square miles, nearly the size of West Virginia. It presents challenges to the Clean Water Ministry, which partners with Navajo church leaders like the Begays and the Sisters to provide resources, including Navajo-language Bibles.

Reddoor and Wallace help lead a Utah congregation built by their late mother. Before the pandemic, the sisters ran canning initiatives and in-person events like movie nights for kids. But the coronavirus was a concern for Esther and Cecilia, who are 70 and 67. Despite the health risks, the sisters spent the early days of the pandemic continuing their work.

This is the first in-person Vacation Bible School in Fox Hill since the pandemic began.

___

Hampton Leaders and Missionaries recognized that the exchange does not come without a complicated history.

Reddoor, now a grandmother, was one of hundreds of thousands of Native American children who were introduced to Christianity through boarding schools. Indigenous children were removed from their homes and sent to a web of institutions designed to assimilate Indigenous children into white culture, institutions where children were punished for speaking their own language or practicing their traditional faith.

Hampton University, just 4 miles from Fox Hill, was used as a boarding school for older students from 1878 to 1923.

Christianity, said Holland, was an integral part of this assimilation. But her ministry is built on building relationships and helping, not “Christianizing” the Navajo, she said.

“We’ve done so many things in the name of Jesus, in the name of the Lord, and in the name of Christianity, that I know the God I serve has no hand in it,” she said. “I’ve read some of the things our government has done – the bottom line is this nation was built on blood.”

Reddoor remembers having to clean bathrooms with toothbrushes after she was caught speaking her native language. Abuse in schools was common. But exposure to Christianity, she said, was the only good thing to come out of the experience.

Begay had a complicated relationship with both the Navajo tradition and his faith.

She hated peyote, a bitter psychoactive herb consumed before nightly rituals to induce visions. His mother passed it on to her children until she became a Christian in 1979. Begay was 10 years old.

The Navajo language now features prominently at Beautiful Mountain; its bilingual Sunday services last for hours.

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“Shíyázhí”, an endearing Navajo term meaning “my child”, is awarded to people who walk through the gates of Beautiful Mountain. ‘Yá’át’ééh’ — “Welcome, the door is open, come in” — is another common greeting, Wallace said.

“Part of our family values ​​in the Navajo tradition is respect, friendship, respecting each other and doing what you can do for yourself,” she said. “So in this reverence, we’re saying to everyone, ‘There’s a God, he’s there, but it doesn’t have to be English. “”

Pastor Sixbey said the relationship between faith, culture and assimilation is complicated. But this collision of culture and faith is not unique, he says.

“Christianity has always had a cultural element. Jesus came in the flesh—he came as a Jew. … Every believer is going to be inculturated, one way or another. It’s always a back and forth. »

He hopes the Bible School will develop a deeper connection between Fox Hill, Navajo reservation churches and Pure Water Ministry.

“These are people like us, they have hopes and dreams like us. They see the world from a different perspective, they live in a different place, but I can sit down, I can talk to them, I can understand them, they can understand me,” Sixbey said. “We can go back and forth. We can be friends.”

Suzannah Perry, suzannah.perry@virginiamedia.com

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