City Associates – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:48:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kcacm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png City Associates – KCACM http://kcacm.org/ 32 32 City and County Officials Inaugurate First Phase of VA Redevelopment | Knoxville https://kcacm.org/city-and-county-officials-inaugurate-first-phase-of-va-redevelopment-knoxville/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:22:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/city-and-county-officials-inaugurate-first-phase-of-va-redevelopment-knoxville/ KNOXVILLE – City and county officials moved the earth Monday morning to signify a new era for the Knoxville VA district. Members of the Knoxville City Council, Marion County Board of Supervisors and other city officials held a groundbreaking ceremony at the old campus to kick off the first phase of the District’s redevelopment project. […]]]>

KNOXVILLE – City and county officials moved the earth Monday morning to signify a new era for the Knoxville VA district.

Members of the Knoxville City Council, Marion County Board of Supervisors and other city officials held a groundbreaking ceremony at the old campus to kick off the first phase of the District’s redevelopment project. Knoxville VA.

In January 2020, the County and City of Knoxville partnered to secure the former 160-acre VA campus for redevelopment. The campus permanently closed in January 2005 and had been vacant since 2009.

The project is now in the hands of the city for redevelopment after the county completed a $10.8 million demolition of the old campus in June.

“[It’s] a new day in the way government works in rural America – with counties, cities and school districts working together – to do amazing things,” said Marion County Board of Supervisors Chairman, Mark Raymie. “And that is what we are celebrating today with this event… We have the opportunity to work for four years with the federal government, to speak to the state, to acquire what was the VA campus, to demolish the VA campus… so far we’re turning over the land for the first phase of infrastructure development.

The first phase will include new housing and a four-acre park on the north side of Pleasant Street, called Veterans Park. The new homes will be a mix of duplexes, townhouses and single-family homes, and the Veterans Park will include a wading pool, among other amenities.

The first phase is estimated at just over $3 million. Elder Corporation, based in Pleasantville, will be responsible for the construction of the project. Snyder and Associates designed the first phase, while Confluence, landscape architects, created the concept plan for the neighborhood – a process that involved community input.

According to Mayor Brian Hatch, this phase is expected to be completed in April 2023, with new homes coming on the market in the spring. Hatch says the first phase “will make the perfect neighborhood for new residents and current residents.”

“We couldn’t be more excited to see this project take off,” he said.

“For the citizens of Marion County, this is your project as well,” Raymie said. “You invested your hard-earned taxes in this for the future of the city and the future of our county to get this back to being the economic engine it was when it was here.”

Emily Hawk is associate editor of the Ottumwa Courier and the Oskaloosa Herald. She can be reached at ehawk@oskyherald.com.

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Concerned Hanceville residents flock to first meeting of five-member commission | New https://kcacm.org/concerned-hanceville-residents-flock-to-first-meeting-of-five-member-commission-new/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/concerned-hanceville-residents-flock-to-first-meeting-of-five-member-commission-new/ The new Cullman County Commission faced an immediate public test this week as the freshly inducted group met for the first time under its new five-member structure. Ahead of its regular November meeting, the expanded commission took questions during a pre-meeting working session to explain the county’s interest in pursuing options beyond the end of […]]]>

The new Cullman County Commission faced an immediate public test this week as the freshly inducted group met for the first time under its new five-member structure.

Ahead of its regular November meeting, the expanded commission took questions during a pre-meeting working session to explain the county’s interest in pursuing options beyond the end of the waste disposal contract. next year at the Cullman County landfill.

Local chatter both online and on the ground had prompted an eager crowd of Hanceville-area residents to show up at Wednesday’s meeting with a list of questions about the county’s interest in a tech test site. recycling bin on private property, just east of town near Mountain Grove Cemetery.

Landowner Thomas Barrett Lynn explained that the site was not considered a potential landfill and was instead recruited by Associate Commissioner Garry Marchman to perform unpaid voluntary testing on the property as the commission is evaluating whether recycling could be a factor in future changes to landfill operations.

The commission allayed residents’ concern that a new landfill could one day take hold in Hanceville, with Lynn explaining that the soil composition in the area is not fit for purpose and that the property – used only for testing purposes – would never receive regulatory approval. for large-scale landfill use.

The county’s current contract with landfill owner Cullman Environmental, Inc. is up for renewal next year, under a pricing structure that ties future customer rate increases to price index changes at consumption (CPI) US. As the CPI is expected to rise, the commission, which manages rural garbage collection through the Cullman County Sanitation Department, is evaluating ways to make safe garbage disposal that minimize costs to the municipal government. and for customers.

Whether it’s finding a new local landfill — said by Lynn only as an option in the far northwest of the county, thanks to soil and terrain attributes — or something else, it’s a subject likely to arise again in the near future as the timeline shifts to 2023. maintain its current schedule of monthly meetings for the upcoming calendar year.

In other business at its regular meeting, the committee:

  • Approved a payment of $20,000 to the Town of Hanceville for its participation in the cleanup and maintenance of Mud Creek for fiscal year 2022. The fee represents an increase from previous annual payments of $15,000 under the partnership.
  • Approved an agreement with Byars Wright Insurance for county property and casualty coverage for fiscal year 2023, at a premium of $512,159. Coverage under the approved plan takes effect on December 1 of this year.
  • Ratified renewal of a permit by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management to operate the borrow pit located on County Road 122, which serves as a materials site for the County Roads Department.
  • Amended a contract with data analytics provider SambaSafety to include certifications for hazardous materials, to expedite registrations involving the use of county-operated vehicles that require a commercial driver’s license.
  • Agreed to allow the Cullman County Public Library to keep half of the proceeds from the recent $8,700 sale of its former bookmobile, with the library receiving $4,350.
  • Extended the county’s current lease agreement with the Cullman Electric Cooperative for two years for the use of the Bates Building, which the cooperative uses to store materials related to its rural Sprout Internet service.
  • Authorized a payment of $27,839.43 to ADS Security to upgrade the current courthouse door access system.
  • Authorized Coroner Jeremy Kilpatrick to sign a memorandum of understanding between the county and the Alabama Department of Public Health’s Office of Emergency Preparedness. The memorandum of understanding will guarantee the county’s use and maintenance, for a period of five years, of a mortuary cooler for emergency use as a container of corpses in the event of a mass casualty event.
  • Authorized Kilpatrick to separately apply for a $20,000 grant through the National Network of Public Health Institutes. If awarded, the grant would require no additional matching from the county and would fund the purchase of cameras, laptops, tablets and case management software for use by the coroner’s office.
  • Authorized
  • Cullman Emergency Management Agency Director Tim Sartin will apply for an Emergency Management Performance Grant for 2023.
  • Approved an annual payment of $19,404.16 to Harris local government for the use of its SmartFusion financial software in county offices.
  • Authorized a $43,696 lease contract with Enterprise Rent-A-Car for a 2022 Dodge Ram truck to be used by the valuation and mapping department.
  • Amended an item previously approved at last month’s regular board meeting to remove a 2016 Ford F-250 from the surplus list and return the vehicle to service.
  • Approval of a proposed plan for Phase 1 of Fly South Campground, a major RV subdivision consisting of 42 lots located along County Road 1196.
  • Awarded standing tender for traffic signs to Traffic Signs, Inc. and Vulcan, Inc., with purchases as needed based on price, availability and proximity.
  • Award of standing offer for traffic tracing to JC Cheek Contractors, Inc.
  • Award of standing offer for corrugated plastic pipe to Bear Concrete Products Inc., ADCO Pipe & Supply LLC and White Cap Construction Supply, with purchases as required based on price, availability and proximity.
  • Set the speed limit along County Road 1121 to 25 mph.
  • Appointed Matt Smith to the Community Action Partnership of North Alabama Board of Directors for a five-year term expiring in November 2027.
  • Added new Associate Commissioners Freeman and Duke to all county bank accounts.
  • Approved the calendar of regular meetings of the commission for the calendar year 2023. Excluding public holidays, the commission meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m., preceded by a public working session at 4 p.m. on the same day. All meetings will be held in the commission meeting room on the first floor of the Cullman County Courthouse.

Benjamin Bullard can be reached by phone at 256-734-2131 ext. 234.

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Grocery mogul Jeff Brown is running for mayor of Philadelphia – NBC10 Philadelphia https://kcacm.org/grocery-mogul-jeff-brown-is-running-for-mayor-of-philadelphia-nbc10-philadelphia/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:57:19 +0000 https://kcacm.org/grocery-mogul-jeff-brown-is-running-for-mayor-of-philadelphia-nbc10-philadelphia/ Grocery store magnate Jeff Brown announced his candidacy for mayor of Philadelphia on Wednesday, joining a crowded field of Democratic candidates vying for the city’s top job. The first outside government to join the race, Brown is the CEO of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., which operates a dozen ShopRites and two Fresh Grocers in and […]]]>

Grocery store magnate Jeff Brown announced his candidacy for mayor of Philadelphia on Wednesday, joining a crowded field of Democratic candidates vying for the city’s top job.

The first outside government to join the race, Brown is the CEO of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., which operates a dozen ShopRites and two Fresh Grocers in and around Philadelphia. The fourth-generation Philadelphia grocer employs more than 2,300 associates, according to its site.

“It has been a privilege to take care of families, and what I have found is that there is a common thread that we all have: we care about our families and we want to take care of them. , we want to feel safe and we want to be respected. . And it’s as simple as that,” Brown told a packed room during his announcement in University City on Wednesday morning.

Brown was one of the most prominent opponents of Mayor Jim Kenney’s soda tax, WHY reported in 2019. He is also known for his efforts in the fight against “food deserts” in the poor neighborhoods of Philadelphia.

Brown joins five more Democrats in Philly mayoral race. Tuesday, real estate developer and former city councilor Allan Domb announced his campaign. Brown and Domb join Maria Quinones-Sanchez, Derek GreenCherelle Parker and Rebecca Rhynhart.

Kenney, who is nearing the end of his second term, cannot run for a third term.

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New Design for City of Cave Spring Website Coming Soon | Local News https://kcacm.org/new-design-for-city-of-cave-spring-website-coming-soon-local-news/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/new-design-for-city-of-cave-spring-website-coming-soon-local-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Construction Approved for LaserShip in EastPark at Town Center | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record https://kcacm.org/construction-approved-for-lasership-in-eastpark-at-town-center-jax-daily-record-jacksonville-daily-record/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 20:28:46 +0000 https://kcacm.org/construction-approved-for-lasership-in-eastpark-at-town-center-jax-daily-record-jacksonville-daily-record/ E-commerce delivery company LaserShip is preparing to build at EastPark in Town Center. The city issued a permit Nov. 8 to Lay Duckworth Construction to renovate 85,049 square feet of space for tenant LaserShip at 11902 Central Parkway at a cost of nearly $64,000. LaserShip, based in Vienna, Va., applied July 25 for a certificate […]]]>

E-commerce delivery company LaserShip is preparing to build at EastPark in Town Center.

The city issued a permit Nov. 8 to Lay Duckworth Construction to renovate 85,049 square feet of space for tenant LaserShip at 11902 Central Parkway at a cost of nearly $64,000.

LaserShip, based in Vienna, Va., applied July 25 for a certificate of use for the building. EastPark is southeast of Beach Boulevard and Interstate 295/St. John’s Bluff Road.

The use is for the delivery of small parcels.

The architect is RDB Design Associates Inc.

LaserShip has leased approximately 19,000 square feet of space at 9446 Philips Highway, Unit 1, Interstate South Commerce Center since June 2019, based on building permits.

LaserShip, founded in 1986, claims to be the largest regional e-commerce package carrier in the United States and a leader in last-mile delivery.

“For more than three decades, we have been the leading provider of last-mile delivery services to the nation’s largest e-retailers and product delivery companies,” he says in the job postings.

The stand-alone EastPark building was developed in 1997. Hartz Mountain Industries of Secaucus, New Jersey, paid $4.7 million for the property on August 10, 2021.

IEM Power Systems, which previously leased EastPark facilities since 2011, moved to a larger location in the NorthPoint Industrial Park.

Cushman & Wakefield managing directors Tyler Newman and Jacob Horsley are representing owner Hartz Mountain Industries Inc. in leasing the IEM building to LaserShip.

JLL Vice President Ross Crabtree represented LaserShip.

In October 2021, LaserShip and OnTrac announced that they would be teaming up to form the first coast-to-coast partnership for last-mile e-commerce deliveries.

LaserShip and OnTrac planned to start linking their networks in 2022.

Be the first to know about the latest news and information that business leaders rely on in this rapidly changing Northeast Florida economy. Regional business news, trends and statistics needed to grow your business. The main upcoming events you won’t want to miss and much more.

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Veterans Day 2022 Military Grocery Discounts https://kcacm.org/veterans-day-2022-military-grocery-discounts/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 00:37:27 +0000 https://kcacm.org/veterans-day-2022-military-grocery-discounts/ In a context of record inflation, it is becoming more and more expensive to eat at home. Food prices have risen steadily over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You can already cut coupons, use cashback apps or shop at home base commissioner to save money on groceries. Now you can […]]]>

In a context of record inflation, it is becoming more and more expensive to eat at home. Food prices have risen steadily over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

You can already cut coupons, use cashback apps or shop at home base commissioner to save money on groceries. Now you can save a little more by shopping on Veterans Day.

Two Southeast grocery chains and a national pharmacy will offer Veterans Day military discounts.

On Friday, November 11, 2022, Publix and Food Lion grocery stores will offer a 10% military discount for veterans, active duty, National Guard and reserve service members.

Walgreens and Duane Reade pharmacies – which offer groceries – will offer a 20% military discount over Veterans Day weekend.

Here’s what you need to know to save more on groceries this month.

Contents
  1. Publix Military Discount
    1. Publix Military Discount Eligibility
    2. Publix Military Discount Exclusions
    3. How Publix Supports Military and Veterans
  2. Food Lion Military Discount
    1. Food Lion Military Discount Eligibility and Exclusions
    2. How Food Lion Supports Military and Veterans
  3. Walgreens Military Discounts
  4. Walgreens Military Discount Eligibility and Exclusions

Publix Military Discount

Veterans and active military can save money on groceries this Veterans Day.

“As a gesture of gratitude, all veterans and active military personnel are invited to save 10% on groceries on Veterans Day, November 11, 2022,” Publix announced on its website.

Courtesy of Publix

Publix Military Discount Eligibility

To receive a military discount at Publix, veterans and military members must present proof of service at checkout.

Publix said cashiers would accept:

Publix Military Discount Exclusions

The Publix Veterans Day deal has some restrictions, according to its website.

The 10% military discount will not apply to:

  • Online orders
  • Alcohol
  • the tobacco
  • Gift cards
  • Lottery tickets
  • postage stamp
  • Applicable sales taxes

How Publix Supports Military and Veterans

Publix frequently recruits transitioning military and veterans to fill more than 19,000 unique positions within the company.

“As you can imagine, every position requires a particular set of skills, and the skills learned while serving in the military often translate into many positions and careers at Publix,” the channel said in its Publix Patriots blog, which profiles veterans of successful careers at Publix. .

“For those in uniform, Publix can be more than a place to shop,” Publix said on its website. “We encourage the hiring of veterans in our stores, warehouses and offices,” Publix said. “We are always on the lookout for a few good associates and encourage all veterans apply here.”

Food Lion Military Discount

Food Lion will also offer veterans and active military members a 10% military discount on grocery purchases.

“Food Lion is proud to show our gratitude to the men and women who serve our country and protect our freedoms every day,” Food Lion President Meg Ham said when the store offered the same Memorial Day military discount in 2017. “It is an honor to thank them for their service to our country by providing this MVP discount to service members and their families.

Courtesy of Food Lion

Food Lion Military Discount Eligibility and Exclusions

Food Lion’s “MVP” discount is only available November 11, 2022.

Military members must also show proof of military service and use their personal Food Lion MVP card to receive the discount.

The 10% military discount applies to groceries only. It will not work on:

  • Alcohol, including beer and wine
  • the tobacco
  • Gift cards
  • Lottery tickets
  • Pharmacy orders
  • postage stamp
  • In-store services

How Food Lion Supports Military and Veterans

Since 2019, Food Lion has partnered with Operation Homefront to address food insecurity among military and veterans.

The grocery chain also offers these 15 veteran owned brands:

  • Battle-tested: signature barbecue sauce and original barbecue sauce
  • Bee City: Pure Raw Honey
  • Enoz Home: Insect and moth repellent for storage, home and garden
  • Fairwinds Brewing Company: variety of craft beers
  • Giovanni Cosmetics: wide range of personal care products for skin and hair
  • Heritage Brewing Company: Variety of Craft Beers
  • Horse Creek Winery: Extensive wine selection including red, white and fruit wines
  • Miami Beef: high quality fresh and frozen meat products
  • Railhouse Brewery: variety of craft beers
  • Brewing Service: Variety of craft beers
  • BBQ Shaffers: A line of Big Julie’s BBQ sauces
  • Southern Pines Brewing: variety of craft beers
  • Tobacco Wood Brewing: Variety of craft beers
  • Wicked Chips: Baked chips full of nutrients made from vegetables, herbs and spices, in a variety of flavors.
  • Young Veterans Brewing Company: variety of craft beers

Food Lion offers a number of benefits to military and veteran employees, including family support when military employees are deployed. In 2010, the Department of Defense presented Food Lion with an Employer Support of the Guard and Reserves (ESGR) Freedom Award for its military associate programs and services.

From Friday, November 11 through Monday, November 14, Walgreens will honor those who serve the country by offering 20% off eligible regular priced in-store itemsWalgreens spokesperson Meredith Beyer wrote in an email to The Military Wallet reporter Teresa Tennyson.

Walgreens offered the same 20% discount May 27-30 in honor of Memorial Day, and on July 4, according to two company press releases.

Courtesy of Walgreens

Walgreens Military Discount Eligibility and Exclusions

“The offer will be available to all veterans, active duty military personnel, and their family members.” Beyer said veterans, active military members and their families are eligible for the discount, but must show valid military ID.

The Walgreens Veterans Day Military Discount only applies to in-store purchases and you must have a myWalgreens Rewards account.

You cannot combine the 20% off for Veterans Day with other promotions or coupons, including “buy one” specials.

Additionally, you cannot use the discount on:

  • Alcohol
  • Dairy
  • the tobacco
  • Stamps
  • Gift cards
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Mandates and transfers
  • Transportation Pass
  • Lottery tickets
  • Charitable donations
  • Ephedrine or pseudoephedrine products
  • Clinical Services
  • orders
  • Pharmacy
  • Bulk orders
  • Out of Stock or Out of Stock Items
  • Sales tax
  • Any purchase subject to insurance reimbursement
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Cook Out plans July opening in Siler City https://kcacm.org/cook-out-plans-july-opening-in-siler-city/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 14:43:57 +0000 https://kcacm.org/cook-out-plans-july-opening-in-siler-city/ SILER CITY – There’s only one place people in North Carolina go where banana pudding and watermelon milkshakes are on the same menu, and that’s in Siler City. Cook Out, a fast food chain with more than 200 locations in the Southeast, has purchased a 1.65 acre lot at 1513 E. 11th St. – across […]]]>

SILER CITY – There’s only one place people in North Carolina go where banana pudding and watermelon milkshakes are on the same menu, and that’s in Siler City.

Cook Out, a fast food chain with more than 200 locations in the Southeast, has purchased a 1.65 acre lot at 1513 E. 11th St. – across from Days Inn, and between Walgreens and Sonic Drive-In – and has a target opening date of July 13, 2023, according to the Triangle Business Journal, which first reported the news on October 26.

The property sold for $620,000, according to the deed filed Oct. 24, and was once a BP gas station. Excise tax on the deed is $1,240 – excise taxes are paid on all real estate transactions at a rate of $1 for every $500 sold, as per North Carolina law .

Jack Meadows, director of planning and community development for Siler City, said the county had preliminary discussions with Summey Engineering Associates, an Asheboro-based engineering firm, about a possible opening of Cook Out in city ​​in the spring of 2021.

“And that’s really all that happened was just answering questions about construction setbacks, the permitting process,” he said. “But no formal request was made, no request for a pre-development meeting, a new site plan or a request for a zoning permit for the project, so it was more about gathering information.”

The last time his department communicated with Summey about the new restaurant was in January, when the engineering firm said he had been put on hold with the project. Meadows said he didn’t hear any updates until TBJ reported the new ownership.

Cook Out CEO Jeremy Reaves did not respond to multiple messages at press time, but given the announced timing of the property’s expected opening, Meadows said he anticipates the city would want to start quickly the development and construction of the site and staff. is ready to process a formal request. The current property has been vacant for some time, Meadows said, but several utilities are already in place to properly service a new business.

“So one of the things that city staff and the city are excited about for these projects is the redevelopment of this site,” he said. “Now it can be put back into operation, as it has been unoccupied for some time. Redevelopment of vacant and underutilized sites is really good for us because road access is there, water and sewer infrastructure is in this area, electricity and all the infrastructure you need to start a business – it’s already there.

For some Chatham County residents, the news is welcome, and even unsurprising, Meadows said.

“I know the word has spread in the community,” Meadows said. “The community was very enthusiastic about the idea of ​​a Cook Out [coming to town].”

Similarly, Siler Town Mayor Chip Price has said for the past year that he has been fielding questions from townspeople about the status of a Cook Out that may be coming to the area.

“They [residents] were asking a long time ago,” Price said with a laugh. “They wanted a Cook Out.”

Siler City resident Wendy Black said she was happy to hear that Cook Out was on the way. Black, 54, said as a single mother, she often took her children to restaurants when they were growing up in Winston-Salem, where they could get combo plates at low prices.

Cook Out, which was founded in 1989 in Greensboro, is best known for its signature menu featuring over 40 milkshake flavors; the chain also serves grilled burgers, chicken sandwiches, Cajun fries, quesadillas and more.

Now that her kids are grown, Black is taking her five grandkids to Cook Out.

Black can’t wait to see more food options come to the county – the customer service rep said when she and her husband moved to Siler City from Pittsboro in 2019, they ‘blew up’ every restaurant in town in just a few months.

“I want this side of Chatham County to start growing and expanding,” Black said. “I mean, because they’re doing all of this in Pittsboro with Chatham Park, and since they put the chicken plant here, I’d like to see a lot more variations of restaurants — not just fast food, but also seating options. .”

Price said he thinks the new location will add more variety to other fast-food chains currently in town. Another benefit he hopes the Siler City restaurant will bring is greater appeal to young people, saying he has noticed that the Cook Out restaurant in Asheboro draws large crowds, especially after local sporting events.

“But we need something,” he said. “It’s nice to have something that young people want to participate in here in our city for a change.”

Meadows said he expects other businesses to continue to set up shop along the US Hwy. 64, a high-traffic freeway commercial corridor, as the county and Siler City evolve and new megasites come to the area.

Elijah Mears, digital brand manager for Express Lane Strategies, lives in Greensboro but driving to visit his and her husband’s parents in western Wake County, said he would bypass traffic on I-40 via US Hwy 421 and Hwy. 64 in Chatham. These drives led Mears to jokingly dub Chatham County a “Cook Out Desert”.

“And a lot of the time, just as we were leaving, we happened to be hungry while we were in Chatham County,” Mears said. “And so we had noticed that there was no Cook Out in Chatham, which is one of our favorite places to stop on the road.”

As someone interested in cartography and having taken GIS courses in college, Mears pulled locations from the channel’s website and created maps displaying all of the Cook Outs in North Carolina, including the “Cook Out Hole” gaping in Chatham. Mears posted the cards on Twitter in October 2020 because he thought others might be interested as well, and the tweet ended up reaching nearly 100 likes.

Although Mears and her husband no longer eat Cook Out as often as they used to, they still make the frequent drive through Chatham, he said.

“But once it’s open, I’m sure we’ll probably just stop on the premise of the matter,” Mears said.

Most Cook Outs are drive-in or only have walk-in windows, but newer locations — like the recently opened Chapel Hill Cook Out at 450 South Elliott Road — also have dinner seating. Meadows said he doesn’t yet know what the Siler City location will look like, but the property’s zoning district allows for outdoor dining and seating, as well as drive-thru.

Journalist Maydha Devarajan can be reached at mdevarajan@chathamnr.com and on Twitter @maydhadevarajan.

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The developer of Eau Claire wants to replace a decrepit building on Water St. https://kcacm.org/the-developer-of-eau-claire-wants-to-replace-a-decrepit-building-on-water-st/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 02:02:15 +0000 https://kcacm.org/the-developer-of-eau-claire-wants-to-replace-a-decrepit-building-on-water-st/ Oct. 30—EAU CLAIRE — A historic two-story building that has stood for 140 years on Water Street is in need of replacement due to deterioration and a desire to redevelop its desirable location. Listed on the Wisconsin and United States Register of Historic Places, the Ottawa House, 602 Water Street, was built in 1882 as […]]]>

Oct. 30—EAU CLAIRE — A historic two-story building that has stood for 140 years on Water Street is in need of replacement due to deterioration and a desire to redevelop its desirable location.

Listed on the Wisconsin and United States Register of Historic Places, the Ottawa House, 602 Water Street, was built in 1882 as part of the city’s recovery from a fire.

The building is an example of “boomtown” commercial architecture, an easy-to-build frame structure distinguished by a tall rectangular facade. These types of buildings are synonymous with frontier towns in the 1800s, but were also seen in many other communities during their early development, according to the Ottawa House Archives of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

The Ottawa house’s name, ownership, and information in city directories indicate that its first floor served as a tavern for the French-Canadian residents of Eau Claire who worked in the nearby sawmills.

Its most recent use was for the Wax Paper bookstore, which disappeared years ago.

Local developer John Mogensen bought 602 Water St. in 2016 and worked to reinvest in the historic building, but ran into major issues with the old structure, according to a report from the city’s community development department.

While gutting the building’s walls and ceilings, Mogensen discovered structural problems with the foundations, walls, and joists.

In his application seeking the city’s permission to demolish the building, Mogensen noted settlement, missing pieces, and failure of various sections of the building’s foundation, which would require the removal of the first and second floors to remedy.

“You can’t fix what’s there,” he wrote.

An architect from Eau Claire who inspected the building also found it to be in poor condition.

“The foundation has failed and must be completely replaced,” Robert Johnson said in an August letter to the city.

The problems with the building were not new, however, as a report by the Eau Claire Fire Department from 1985, when the building was seeking historic status, noted that the east wall of the Ottawa House was in collapsing. The report ends by noting that the questionable structure of the building means major repairs or demolition may be required.

The current condition of the building is bad enough that the city assesses its value at only $10,000. Meanwhile, the 5,544-square-foot land it sits on along Water Street — known for its businesses and housing frequented by UW-Eau Claire students and other city residents — is worth $83,200, according to city property records.

After the city’s Landmarks Commission agreed at its September 12 meeting that the Ottawa House could be demolished, plans for a new building to replace it were filed with the city.

Joe Miller, who works for Mogensen’s Investment Realty, is proposing to build a two-story mixed-use building on the land at 602 Water St.

The ground floor will have two small commercial spaces at the front along Water Street, suitable for what is currently in high demand for Eau Claire businesses.

“Over the past three years, we’ve had a noticeable trend with commercial spaces,” Miller wrote. “Commercial tenants are looking for smaller spaces between 750 and 1,500 square feet.”

The rear half of the ground floor will consist of two two-bedroom apartments. The second level of the building will be divided into four two-bedroom apartments, according to floor plans submitted to the city.

The new building is designed to pay homage to its predecessor. Wood clapboard siding and a decorative front facade reminiscent of the Ottawa home are among the plans, according to Miller’s letter to the city.

The Eau Claire Plan Commission will hold a public hearing and vote at its 7 p.m. meeting today (Monday) on the site plan and a rezoning that would include the Ottawa House lot.

The city council will then hold a public hearing on November 7 before a decisive vote is taken the following day to allow the new construction project to proceed.

other business

Also at the Planning Commission meeting tonight (Monday):

—Eau Claire GI Associates is seeking approval to create a 7,800 square foot medical office building on an empty 5-acre lot at 3940 Oakwood Hills Parkway. This land is located between Bremer Bank and the Home2 Suites hotel, along the road that surrounds the Oakwood Mall.

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Dangers of night driving https://kcacm.org/dangers-of-night-driving/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 14:00:49 +0000 https://kcacm.org/dangers-of-night-driving/ Many people already know that driving at night can often be more dangerous than driving during the day. Not everyone realizes how many dangers play into what makes night driving so risky. Understanding some of these dangers could help you avoid car accidents at night. However, if you were in an accident, consider seeking assistance […]]]>

Many people already know that driving at night can often be more dangerous than driving during the day. Not everyone realizes how many dangers play into what makes night driving so risky. Understanding some of these dangers could help you avoid car accidents at night. However, if you were in an accident, consider seeking assistance from a Kansas City auto accident attorney.

Types of Night Driving Hazards

There are many dangers of driving at night which can increase the risk of a car accident. Darkness is the most known danger at night because of how vision is affected. Vision is affected in more than one way in dark or dark areas.

In major cities, rush hour tends to occur late at night, often after dark. Crowded roads with traffic and lonely pedestrians can increase the chance of error. Driving in the dark and with heavy traffic can increase car accidents even more. Be very careful when driving in heavy traffic at night.

Drunk driving is also more common at night. Most people use alcohol and other drugs in the evening. This increases the chances of encountering drugged drivers when driving at night. We are wary of drivers who swerve or veer out of their lane at night. Maintain a safe distance from them until you can pass them or move away from them.

The same goes for drowsy drivers. Sleep-deprived drivers are more common in the late evening when returning home. Falling asleep at the wheel leads to thousands of car accidents every year. Driving can still be dangerous without falling asleep at the wheel when the driver loses concentration, swerves or fails to react in time to changes in the road.

How the night affects vision

Vision is affected in multiple ways when driving at night. learn how night driving impairs vision can help you avoid accidents in the future by driving more alertly. On the one hand, darkness makes it much more difficult to visually see objects, other drivers and pedestrians on the road.

Not being able to see objects that are in the dark limits drivers to seeing only what their headlights and streetlights reveal. At the same time, trying to accurately see distant objects becomes difficult. Judging the distance of objects also becomes difficult and can easily lead to accidents.

These limitations work together to create reaction time issues. It is much more difficult to react in time to avoid a collision if the driver has misjudged the distance. Collisions also happen when drivers see the object at the last minute and don’t have enough time to stop. Consider contacting an auto accident attorney in Kansas City if you have been in an accident.

Kansas City Auto Accident Lawyer

Recovering from a major car accident isn’t always easy, but you don’t have to do it alone. You can contact Peterson and Associates PC today at (816) 888-8888 to speak to a Kansas City Auto Accident Lawyer for a consultation. Our legal team can help you increase your chances of being compensated for medical expenses, pain and suffering and lost wages. We serve customers in Kansas City, Missouri.

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City of Concord seeks to preserve historic black neighborhood https://kcacm.org/city-of-concord-seeks-to-preserve-historic-black-neighborhood/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 02:43:00 +0000 https://kcacm.org/city-of-concord-seeks-to-preserve-historic-black-neighborhood/ Concord officials are calling on residents who live in the Logan community to share photos and memories of the neighborhood as part of the nomination. CONCORD, NC – The Logan neighborhood is one of the largest historically rich African-American communities in Concorde. Now, city officials want to celebrate the diverse history in hopes of subduing […]]]>

Concord officials are calling on residents who live in the Logan community to share photos and memories of the neighborhood as part of the nomination.

CONCORD, NC – The Logan neighborhood is one of the largest historically rich African-American communities in Concorde. Now, city officials want to celebrate the diverse history in hopes of subduing the neighborhood to become part of the National Register of Historic Places.

This designation recognizes properties that are architecturally or historically significant to the community. Logan resident Bernard Davis, Jr., 83, has seen that prominence grow over the years.

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“We tend to move on with the times without taking the time to take care of the things that we should have taken care of when we were living day to day and that’s our story,” Davis, Jr. said.

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He remembers that one of the neighborhood’s most iconic figures was Logan School, which was the only high school in Cabarrus County until the 1970s. Today, all that remains of that building has been renovated to make it a community center and a daycare centre.

“The further back you go, the less they know, so we need the books, we need the tapes, we need everything that has to be the past,” Davis, Jr. said.

As part of the nomination process, the City of Concord is asking the community to be part of the memory sharing process.

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“The National Register documents buildings, structures, objects and sites,” said Richard Grubb & Associates, senior architectural historian Annie McDonald. “But in many places the structures have disappeared, so documenting the memory, the value of the place for the local community is an essential element.”

Residents can share their memories at the next community meeting or submit information through the online portal.

Contact Briana Harper at bharper@wcnc.com and follow her on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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